B. Internal Structure

B Internal Structure. Here, again, no line of demarcation can be drawn between the animal and vegetable kingdoms. In this respect all plants and animals are fundamentally similar, being alike composed of molecular, cellular, and fibrous tissues.

C. Chemical Composition

C Chemical Composition. Plants, speaking generally, exhibit a preponderance of ternary compounds of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen - such as starch, cellulose, and sugar - whilst nitrogenised compounds enter more largely into the composition of animals. Still both kingdoms contain identical or representative compounds, though there may be a difference in the proportion of these to one another. Moreover, the most characteristic of all vegetable compounds - viz., cellulose - has been detected in the outer covering of the Sea-squirts, or Ascidian Molluscs; and the so-called "glycogen," which is secreted by the liver of the Mammalia, is closely allied to, if not absolutely identical with, the hydrated starch of plants. As a general rule, however, it may be stated that the presence in any organism of an external envelope of cellulose raises a strong presumption of its vegetable nature. In the face, however, of the facts above stated, the presence of cellulose cannot be looked upon as absolutely conclusive. Another highly characteristic vegetable compound is chlorophyll, the green colouring - matter of plants. Any organism which exhibits chlorophyll in any quantity, as a proper element of its tissues, is most probably vegetable. As in the case of cellulose, however, the presence of chlorophyll cannot be looked upon as a certain test, since it occurs normally in certain undoubted animals (e.g., Stentor, amongst the Infusoria, and the Hydra viridis, or the green Fresh-water Polype, amongst the Coelenterata).

Fig. 1.   Algae and Infusoria. a Ciliated zoospores of Confervoe; b Ciliated zoospore of Vaucheria; c Volvox globator, a locomotive fresh water plant; d Euplotes charon, one of the Infusoria. All greatly magnified.

Fig. 1. - Algae and Infusoria. a Ciliated zoospores of Confervoe; b Ciliated zoospore of Vaucheria; c Volvox globator, a locomotive fresh-water plant; d Euplotes charon, one of the Infusoria. All greatly magnified.

D. Motor Power

D Motor Power. This, though broadly distinctive of animals, can by no means be said to be characteristic of them. Thus, many animals in their mature condition are permanently fixed, or attached to some foreign object; and the embryos of many plants, together with not a few adult forms, are endowed with locomotive power by means of those vibratile, hair-like processes which are called "cilia," and are so characteristic of many of the lower forms of animal life. Not only is this the case, but large numbers of the lower plants, such as the Diatoms and Desmids, exhibit throughout life an amount and kind of locomotive power which does not admit of being rigidly separated from the movements executed by animals, though the closest researches have hitherto failed to show the mechanism whereby these movements are brought about.