Capitulum

(Lat. dim. of caput, head). Applied to the body of a Barnacle (Lepadidae), from its being supported upon a stalk or peduncle.

Carapace

A protective shield. Applied to the upper shell of Crabs, Lobsters, and many other Crustacea ; also to the case with which certain of the Infusoria are provided. Also the upper half of the immovable case in which the body of a Chelonian is protected.

Carinatae

(Lat. carina, a keel). Applied by Huxley to all those birds in which the sternum is furnished with a median ridge or keel.

Carnivora

(Lat. caro, flesh; voro, I devour). An order of the Mammalia.

Carnivorous

(Lat. caro, flesh; voro, I devour). Feeding upon flesh.

Carnose

(Lat. caro). Fleshy.

Carpophaga

(Gr. karpos, fruit; phago, I eat). A section of the Marsu-pialia.

Carpus

(Gr. karpos, the wrist). The small bones which intervene between the fore-arm and the metacarpus.

Catarhina

(Gr. kata, downwards; rhines, nostrils). A group of the Quadru-mana.

Caudal

(Lat. cauda, the tail). Belonging to the tail.

Cavicornia

(Lat. cavus, hollow; cornu, a horn). The "hollow-horned" Ruminants, in which the horn consists of a central bony " horn-core " surrounded by a horny sheath.

Centrum

(Gr. kentron, the point round which a circle is described by a pair of compasses). The central portion or "body" of a vertebra.

Cephalic

(Gr. kephale, head). Belonging to the head.

Cephalo-branchiate

(Gr. kephale ; and bragchia, gill). Carrying gills upon the head. Applied to a section of the Annelida, which, like the Serpulae, have tufts of external gills placed upon the head.

Cephalophora

(Gr. kephale ; and phero, I carry). Used synonymously with Encephala, to designate those Mollusca which possess a distinct head.

Cephalopoda

(Gr. kephale; and podes, feet). A class of the Mollusca, comprising the Cuttle-fishes and their allies, in which there is a series of arms ranged round the head.

Cephalothorax

(Gr. kephale; and thorax, chest). The anterior division of the body in many Crustacea and Arachnida, which is composed of the coalesced head and chest.

Cercariiform

(Lat. cercaria, a tailed animalcule; and forma, shape).

Cer-caria

(Gr. kerkos, tail) is the name of a tadpole-shaped animalcule ; and the epithet "cercariiform" is applied to all organisms of a similar shape (e.g., the larval Tunicates).

Cere

The naked space found at the base of the bill of some birds.

Cervical

(Lat. cervix, neck). Connected with the region of the neck.

Cestoidea

(Gr. kestos, a girdle). An old name for the Taeniada, a class of intestinal worms with flat bodies like tape (hence the name Tapeworms).

Cestraphori

(Gr. kestra, a weapon ; phero, I carry). The group of Elasmo-branchii represented at the present day by the Port Jackson Shark.