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Stories of Animal Sagacity | by William Henry Giles Kingston



300+ tales of how clever various individual animals have been seen to be, and in most cases a little moral is drawn from the story. The book includes 60 illustrations.

TitleStories of Animal Sagacity
AuthorWilliam Henry Giles Kingston
Illustrated byHarrison Weir
PublisherT. Nelson and Sons., London.
Year1875
Copyright1875 T. Nelson and Sons

The original book was scanned and OCR'ed by Athelstane e-Books, London, England, United Kingdom.

Kingston, William Henry Giles (1814-1880), English novelist, son of Lucy Henry Kingston, was born in London on the 28th of February 1814. Much of his youth was spent at Oporto, where his father was a merchant, but when he entered the business, he made his headquarters in London. He early wrote newspaper articles on Portuguese subjects. These were translated into Portuguese, and the author received a Portuguese order of knighthood and a pension for his services in the conclusion of the commercial treaty of 1842.

In 1844 his first book, The Circassian Chief, appeared, and in 1845 The Prime Minister, a Story of the Days of the Great Marquis of Pombal. The Lusitanian Sketches describe Kingston's travels in Portugal.

In 1851 Peter the Whaler, his first book for boys, came out. These books proved so popular that Kingston retired from business, and devoted himself to the production of tales of adventure for boys. Within thirty years he wrote upwards of one hundred and thirty such books. He had a practical knowledge of seamanship, and his stories of the sea, full of thrilling adventures and hairbreadth escapes, exactly hit the taste of his boy readers.

Characteristic specimens of his work are The Three Midshipmen; The Three Lieutenants; The Three Commanders; and The Three Admirals. He also wrote popular accounts of famous travellers by land and sea, and translated some of the stories of Jules Verne.

In all philanthropic schemes Kingston took deep interest; he was the promoter of the mission to seamen; and he acted as secretary of a society for promoting an improved system of emigration. He was editor of the Colonist for a short time in 1844 and of the Colonial Magazine and East Indian Review from 1849 to 1851. He was a supporter of the volunteer movement in England from the first.

He died at Willesden on the 5th of August 1880.

Part I: Chapter One: Cats

-Cats.
I have undertaken, my young friends, to give you a number of anecdotes, which will, I think, prove that animals possess not only instinct, which guides them in ...
-The Cat and the Knocker.
When you see Pussy seated by the fireside, blinking her eyes, and looking very wise, you may often ask, I wonder what she can be thinking about. Just then, ...
-The Cat and the Rabbit-trap.
An instance of the sagacity of a cat came under my own notice. I was living, a few years ago, in a country place in Dorsetshire, when one day a small tortoise- ...
-Affection exhibited by a Cat.
I was one day calling in Dorsetshire on a clever, kind old lady, who showed me a beautiful tabby cat, coiled up before the fire. Seventeen years ago, said she, ...
-The Cat and her young Mistresses.
My friend Mrs F gave me a very touching anecdote. A lady she knew, residing in Essex, once had two young daughters. They had a pet cat which they had reared ...
-The Cat which died of Grief.
A lady in France possessed a cat which exhibited great affection for her. She accompanied her everywhere, and when she sat down always lay at her feet. From no ...
-The Cat and the Canary.
Animals of a very different character often form curious friendships. What do you think of the cat which of her own accord became the protector of a pet canary, ...
-The Cat and the Frog.
I have an instance of a still stranger friendship to mention. The servants of a country-house and I am sure that they were kind people had enticed a frog from ...
-The Cat and her dead Kitten.
That cats expect those to whom they are attached to sympathise with them in their sorrow, is shown by an affecting story told by Dr. Good, the author of the ...
-The Kitten and the Chickens.
Kittens, especially if deprived of their natural protectors, seem to long for the friendship of other beings, and will often roam about till they find a person ...
-The Cat and the Pigeon.
Similar affection for one of the feathered race was shown by a cat which was rearing several kittens. In another part of the loft a pigeon had built her nest; ...
-The Cat and the Leveret.
Cats exhibit their affectionate nature in a variety of ways. If deprived of their kittens, they have a yearning for the care of some other young creatures, ...
-The Cat and the Puppies.
I have a longer story than the last to tell, of a cat which undertook the nursing of some puppies while she already had some kittens of her own. It happened ...
-The Cat and the Burglars.
No stronger evidence of the sagacity of the cat is to be found than an instance narrated to me by my friend, Mrs F , and for which I can vouch. A lady, Miss P , ...
-The Cat which rang the Bell.
I have heard of another cat, who, had she lived in Lord s house when attacked by robbers, might very speedily have aroused the family. This cat, however, lived ...
-The affectionate Cat that could measure time.
The last story reminds me of Mrs F s account of the cat and the knocker. That same intelligent little cat was also one of the most affectionate of her race.
-The Cat and the Prisoner.
While speaking of the affection of cats, I must not forget to mention a notable example of it shown by the favourite cat of a young nobleman in the days of ...
-The Cat and the Hawk.
Cats often show great courage, especially in defence of their young. A cat had led her kittens out into the sunshine, and while they were frisking around her ...
-The benevolent Cat.
That we must attribute to cats the estimable virtue of benevolence, Mrs F gives me two anecdotes to prove. A lady in the south of Ireland having lost a pet cat, ...
-The Cat and her many Guests.
Mrs F vouches for the following account, showing the hospitable disposition of cats. It was given to her by a clergyman, who had it direct from a friend. A ...
-The Dishonest Cat.
I am sorry to say that cats are not always so amiable as those I have described, but will occasionally play all sorts of tricks, like some dishonest boys and ...
-Pussy and the Cream-jug.
I must now tell you of another cat which was a sad thief, and showed a considerable amount of sagacity in obtaining what she wanted. One day she found a cream- ...
-The revengeful Cat.
Cats often show that they possess some of the vices as well as some of the virtues of human beings. The tom-cat is frequently fierce, treacherous, and ...

Part II: Chapter Two: Dogs

-Dogs.
We now come to the noble Dog, indued by the Creator with qualities which especially fit him to be the companion of man. Such he is in all parts of the world; ...
-The Dog Rosswell.
I will begin with some anecdotes which I am myself able to authenticate. Foremost must stand the noble Rosswell, who belonged to some connections of mine. He ...
-The Shepherd’s Dog and the lost Child.
I am sorry that I do not know the name of a certain shepherd s dog, but which deserves to be recorded in letters of gold. His master, who had charge of a flock ...
-My Dog Alp.
A dear friend gave me, many years ago, a rough, white terrier puppy, which I called Alp. I fed him with my own hand from the first, and he consequently evinced ...
-The Dog and the Thief.
A gentleman who lived near Stirling, possessed a powerful mastiff. One evening, as he was going his rounds through the grounds, he observed a man with a sack ...
-The Cleanly Dog.
A friend told me of another dog, which had been taught habits of cleanliness that some young gentlemen, accustomed to enter the drawing-room with dirty shoes, ...
-Master Rough.
Having mentioned this cleanly dog, I must next introduce to you a canine friend, called Master Rough, belonging to my kind next-door neighbours; and I think ...
-Byron, the Newfoundland Dog.
Next on my list of canine favourites stands a noble Newfoundland dog named Byron, which belonged to the father of my friend, Mrs F . On one occasion he ...
-The Newfoundland Dog and the marked Shilling.
I must now tell you a story which many believe, but which others consider too good to be true. A gentleman who owned a fine Newfoundland dog, of which he was ...
-The lost Keys.
Many species of dogs appear, like the last mentioned, to be especially indued with the faculty of distinguishing their master s property, and to possess the ...
-The Dog which acted as Constable.
Mrs F told me another anecdote, which illustrates the fidelity and reasoning power so frequently exhibited by the shepherd s dog. About the year 1827, her ...
-The lost Child recovered.
In the backwoods of North America lived a settler and his family, far away from towns and villages. The children of such families at an early age learn to take ...
-Dog waking up Servants.
I have told you of Tyrol, who used to ring the bell; I will now describe another dog named Dash, who was still more clever. When any of the servants of the ...
-The Sheep-Dog and his Mistress’s Cloak.
There are many instances of dogs showing attention to their owner s interests. Mr Jesse mentions one which exhibits a wonderful power of reasoning in a dog.
-The Dog and the Mare.
Dogs and horses frequently form friendships. A Newfoundland dog had attached himself to a mare belonging to his master, and seemed to consider himself ...
-The two Dogs and their Charge.
I must give you another anecdote somewhat similar to the last. A little terrier, and another dog, equally faithful and sagacious, had attached themselves to ...
-Crib the Bull-Terrier saving the Life of Bob the Setter.
Two dogs belonged to the family of Mrs F . One, Bob, a black setter, who was, like most of his species, an excellent swimmer; the other, Crib, a bull-terrier, ...
-The Newfoundland Dog and the thievish Porter.
A grocer owned a Newfoundland dog, which used frequently to take charge of the shop. While thus lying down with his nose between his paws, he observed one of ...
-The Terrier and the Ducklings.
A terrier, which lived at Dunrobin Castle many years ago, had a family of puppies, which were taken from her and drowned. How she mourned for her offspring, ...
-The Newfoundland Dog saving the Mastiff.
I must tell you one more anecdote of two dogs of a similar character to one I gave you a few pages back, but in this instance they were professed enemies. It ...
-The Newfoundland punishing the little Dog.
You remember the way Byron punished his troublesome little assailant. Another Newfoundland dog, of a noble and generous disposition, was often assailed in the ...
-The Terrier and the Bantam.
Among the strange friendships existing between animals of different natures, I must mention one formed between a terrier and a bantam. The little dog was ...
-The compassionate Dog which saved Pussy’s Life.
I must give you another instance, still more curious than the former, of friendship between two animals. A number of rough boys in Liverpool had stoned a cat, ...
-Fop playing at Hide-and-Seek.
Not only can dogs be taught all sorts of amusing tricks, but they can play intelligently at games themselves. Mrs Lee tells us of a fox-terrier named Fop, who ...
-The Spaniel and his Friend the Partridge.
Here is another instance of friendship existing between a dog and a bird. A lady possessed a spaniel named Tom. After she had had Tom several years, a red- ...
-The Dog which traced his Master.
Dogs often show much regard for each other, as well as for other animals; but they certainly possess a still greater affection for human beings. A gentleman ...
-The Dog which travelled alone by Railway.
A Preston paper gave some time ago an account of a dog which travelled alone by railway in search of his master. In this instance the animal acted much as any ...
-Neptune; or, faithful to trust.
At an inn in Wimborne in Dorsetshire, near which town I resided, was kept, some years ago, a magnificent Newfoundland dog called Neptune. His fame was ...
-The affectionate Poodle.
A gentleman residing at Dresden possessed a poodle which he had always treated kindly, and which was especially fond of him. He at length, however, made a ...
-The Newfoundland Dog and the Hats.
In sagacity, the Newfoundland surpasses dogs of all other breeds. Two gentlemen, brothers, were out shooting wild-fowl, attended by one of these noble animals.
-The Newfoundland Dog and the Wreck.
How often has the noble Newfoundland dog been the means of saving the lives of those perishing in the water! A heavy gale was blowing, when a vessel was seen ...
-Dandie, the Miser.
Dandie, a Newfoundland dog belonging to Mr McIntyre of Edinburgh, stands unrivalled for his cleverness and the peculiarity of his habits. Dandie would bring ...
-The Dog and the Burglar.
Some years ago, a stranger arrived at the house of a shopkeeper in Deptford who let lodgings, stating that he had just arrived from the West Indies, and would ...
-The Poodle and the Stranger Robber.
An English gentleman travelling abroad was accompanied by a favourite poodle. On one occasion he met an agreeable stranger at an hotel, to whom, as they were ...
-The Dog holding the Thief.
A dog of the Highland breed, belonging to Lord Arbuthnot, treated a thief in much the same way as my friend s dog did the robber of his apple-orchard. The ...
-The Faithless Watch-Dog.
Faithful as dogs are in general, I am sorry to have to record an instance to the contrary. A watch-dog, whose special duty was to remain at his post during the ...
-The Shoeblack’s Dog.
Dogs have been frequently trained to act roguish parts. An English officer visiting Paris, was annoyed one day by having a little poodle run up to him and rub ...
-The Terrier and the Pin.
A Terrier deservedly a pet in the family for his gentleness and amiability was playing with one of the children, when suddenly he was heard to utter a snarl, ...
-The Dog and his injured Friend.
Dogs frequently form warm friendships, and help each other in time of trouble. Two dogs belonging to the same owner had become great friends. Ponto and Dick, ...
-The Dog and the Surgeon.
I must tell you of another dog which showed not only affection for a companion, but a wonderful amount of sense. He once broke his leg, in which state he was ...
-The Dog preventing the Cat stealing.
The owner of a spaniel was one day called away from his dinner-table, leaving a dog and a favourite cat in the room. On his return he found the spaniel ...
-One Dog getting Assistance from another.
Two dogs living in the neighbourhood of Cupar, in Fife, used to fight desperately whenever they met, the one belonging to Captain R , the other to a farmer.
-The Pointer and the bad Shot.
Dogs, like human beings, show that they can criticise the conduct of those they serve. A gentleman from London, more accustomed to handle an umbrella than a ...
-Bass, the great Saint Bernard Dog.
Sir Thomas Dick Lauder had a dog named Bass, brought when a puppy from the Great Saint Bernard. His bark was tremendous, and might be distinguished nearly a ...
-The Dog and the Newspaper.
Several dogs have been taught to go to the post-office for their masters newspapers, or to receive them from the newsman. A neighbour of mine, who was fond of ...
-The steady Pointer.
It is wonderful how completely dogs can be trained to the performance of their duties. A well-practised pointer was about to leap over a rail, when she ...
-The Young Doctor and Pincher.
One of the cleverest and most amusing of dogs was Pincher, a rough Scotch terrier, belonging to Mrs Lee s brother. (See Mrs Lee s Anecdotes of Animals. ) The ...
-Sirrah, the Ettrick Shepherd’s Dog.
Sirrah, fortunately for his fame, possessed a master in James Hogg, the Ettrick Shepherd, well able to recount his history. Hogg bought Sirrah of a drover for ...
-The Dog and the Fowls.
A House-Dog, whose kennel was in a farmyard, used to have his mess of food brought to him daily in a tin can, and placed before his abode. No sooner had the ...
-Barbekark, the Greenland Dog.
The dog is the companion of the savage, as well as the civilised man, in all parts of the world. He accompanies the wretched Fuegan in his hunts, partaking ...
-The Esquimaux Dog Smile.
Captain Hall had another dog, Smile by name, the noblest looking, the best leader, and seal and bear dog, ever met with. One day he was out with dogs and ...

Part III: Chapter Three: Horses

-The Mare and her Foal.
The horse becomes the willing servant of man, and when kindly treated looks upon him as a friend and protector. I have an interesting story to tell you of a ...
-The Newsman’s Horse.
The memory of horses is most remarkable. The newsman of a provincial paper was in the habit of riding his horse once or twice a week to the houses of fifty or ...
-The two wise Cart-Horses.
Cart-horses, though heavy-looking animals, are more sagacious that their more gracefully formed relatives. A cart-horse had been driven from a farmyard to the ...
-The Author’s Horse becoming his Guide.
I was once travelling in the interior of Portugal with several companions. My horse had never been in that part of the country before. We left our inn at ...
-The wise Horse and the Pump.
A horse was shut up in a paddock near Leeds, in a corner of which stood a pump with a tub beneath it. The groom, however, often forgot to fill the tub, the ...
-The Pony which saved a little Girl’s Life.
A small pony, belonging to a gentleman in Warwickshire, was fed in a park through which a canal passes. It was a great favourite, having been long kept in the ...
-The Horse and the Shipwreck.
A remarkable instance of a horse saving human life occurred some years ago at the Cape of Good Hope. A storm was raging, when a vessel, dragging her anchors, ...
-The Irish Horse and the Infant.
Mrs F mentions several instances of the sagacity of horses. Some horses in the county of Limerick, which were pastured in a field, broke bounds like a band of ...
-The humane Cart-Horse and the Child.
A carter in Strathmiglo, Fifeshire, had an old horse, which was as familiar with his family as a dog could have been. He used to play with the children, and ...
-The faithful Horse and his Rider.
Horses have been known to fight for their friends, both human and canine. A farmer near Edinburgh possessed a hunter which had carried him safely for many a ...
-Jack and his Driver.
Mr Smiles, in his Life of Rennie, tells us of a horse called Jack, who showed himself to be fully as sensible as the two animals just mentioned. Jack s ...
-The Horse which fought for a Dog.
I have given several instances of friendship existing between horses and dogs. A fine hunter had formed a friendship with a handsome greyhound which slept in ...
-The Arab Steed and the Chief.
Monsieur De Lamartine s beautiful story of the Arab chief and his favourite steed has often been told. It shall form one of our anecdotes of horses. A chief, ...
-The old Charger.
The horse has been frequently known to recognise his rider after a long absence. He is also especially a sociable animal, and once accustomed to others of his ...

Part IV: Chapter Four: Donkeys

-Donkeys.
Degraded as it is supposed they are by nature, and cruelly ill-used as donkeys too often are in England, they are fully as intelligent as horses. They are not ...
-Donkey Bob, the Policeman.
Mrs F s father-in-law had a donkey named Bob, which was kept in a field with other animals, and grazed quietly with them, but jealously guarded the entrance ...
-The Ass and the Door-Latch.
Donkeys sometimes exert their ingenuity to their own advantage, like some other creatures. A certain ass had his quarters in a shed, in front of which was a ...
-The Ass and the Teetotaller.
The ass has a memory not inferior to that of the horse. This was especially noticeable in the case of an ass belonging to a carrier at Wigan. The ass and his ...
-The Donkey and his Mistress.
Donkeys are capable of great affection for those who treat them well. An old woman, known to Mrs F , had a donkey which usually grazed on the roadside near her ...
-The brave Ass and his Foe.
I have heard of a donkey which on one occasion bravely did battle for himself. He happened to be feeding near a river when a fierce bull-dog attacked him; but ...
-The Baker’s Donkey.
I met some time ago with an account of a clever donkey which was employed in drawing a baker s cart. He was so well acquainted with the houses of all his ...
-The shipwrecked Ass.
An ass was shipped at Gibraltar on board the Isis frigate, to be sent to Captain Dundas, then at Malta. The ship, on her voyage, struck on a sand-bank off Cape ...
-The old Hawker and his Donkey.
An old hawker was in the habit of traversing the country with his ass, which had served him faithfully for many years. To help himself along, he used ...
-The musical Ass.
We have no less an authority than Dr. Franklin to prove that donkeys enjoy music. The mistress of a chateau in France where he visited had an excellent voice, ...

Part V: Chapter Five: Elephants

-Elephants.
We have, I think, sufficient evidence to prove that elephants are more sagacious, and possessed of greater reasoning power, than any other animals. They seem, ...
-The Elephant in a Well.
While the British troops were besieging Bhurtpore in India, the water in the ponds and tanks in the neighbourhood becoming exhausted, it could only be obtained ...
-The Elephant accusing his Driver of Theft.
The following anecdote shows the elephant s perception of what is right. A large elephant was sent a few years ago to assist in piling up timber at Nagercoil.
-The Elephant and the tipsy Soldier.
Some years ago a soldier, stationed at Pondicherry, formed a friendship with an elephant, to whom he used to give a portion of his daily allowance of liquor.
-Elephants helping each other.
When an army marches in India, elephants are employed in carrying field-pieces, levelling roads, piling up timber, fetching water; all of which, and many other ...
-The Elephant and the rotten Bridge.
It is seldom that an elephant can be induced to pass over ground he considers unsafe. Sometimes, however, a driver obtains such a mastery over a timid animal, ...
-The Elephant turned Nurse.
Who would expect to see a huge elephant take care of a delicate little child? Yet more vigilant and gentle nurses cannot be found than are some of these ...
-The wounded Elephant and the Surgeon.
To conclude my anecdotes about elephants, I must tell you two which show, even more than the other incidents I have mentioned, the wonderful sense they possess.

Part VI: Chapter Six: Oxen

-Oxen.
The virtues of cows are more active than passive. I may sum them up by saying that they are very affectionate mothers, and will sometimes, like horses and dogs, ...
-The Proud Cow.
Mrs F told me the following anecdote: Her father had four cows, which every evening, at milking-time, were driven from the field into their byre. On their way ...
-The Cow and her Tormentor.
In my younger days, I had a companion who used to catch our tutor s cow by the tail, and make her drag him at full speed round and round the field. One day, ...
-A Cow seeking her Calf.
Cows have as much affection for their young as have other animals, and it is piteous to hear them mooing when deprived of their calves. A cow had her calf ...
-A savage Bull tamed by Kindness.
A savage bull was kept in a farmyard constantly chained on account of its fierceness. A gentleman who went to stay at the farm was an especial object of ...
-The faithful Buffalo.
Ferocious in aspect as is the long hairy-skinned buffalo or properly the bison of America, and savage when attacked, yet it is capable of devoted affection ...
-The affectionate Buffalo-Bull.
The cow-buffaloes are frequently attracted by a ruse of the Indians, which they call making a calf. One of the party covers himself with a buffalo-skin, and ...
-The kind Ox and the Sheep.
I have to tell you of an instance of the benevolence of an ox. Oxen may possess many virtues, but are not in the habit of making a parade of them. Sheep are ...
-The courageous Bull.
I remember meeting with an account of a bull, which fed on the savannahs of Central America. He had gored so many cattle, that he was at length caught with a ...
-The brave Bull and the wise Pig.
A pig had been stolen by two men, who were driving it at night along an unfrequented path in the neighbourhood of Rotherham. As the pig squeaked loudly, they ...

Part VII: Chapter Seven: Savage and other Animals

-The Lion and his Keeper.
The majestic step, the bold look, the grace and strength of the lion, have obtained for him the title of king of beasts. He is greatly indebted, however, to ...
-The generous Lion and his Assailants.
The custom existed till lately on the Continent of having combats between wild animals and dogs, although they were very different from the spectacles ...
-The grateful Lion.
A remarkably handsome African lion was being sent to the coast, where it was to be placed on board ship, to be carried to France, when it fell ill. Its keepers, ...
-The Tiger and his Companions.
On one of her voyages from China, the Pitt, East Indiaman, had on board, among her passengers, a young tiger. He appeared to be as harmless and playful as a ...
-The Tigress and her Young.
The tigress generally takes much less care of her young than does the lioness of her whelps. Occasionally, however, she shows the same maternal affection. Two ...
-The Wolf and his Master.
Even a wolf, savage as that animal is, may, if caught young, and treated kindly, become tame. A story is told of a wolf which showed a considerable amount of ...
-Foxes: their domestic Habits.
Arrant thieves as foxes are, with regard to their domestic virtues Mrs F assures me that they eminently shine. Both parents take the greatest interest in ...
-The Fox and the Wild-Fowl.
Mrs F gave me the following account of the ingenious stratagem of a fox, witnessed by a friend. He was lying one summer s day under the shelter of some shrubs ...
-The Labourer and the sly Fox.
A labourer going to his work one morning, caught sight of a fox stretched out at full length under a bush. Believing it to be dead, the man drew it out by the ...
-The Fox in the Hen-Roost.
I cannot help fancying that Irish foxes are even more cunning than their brethren in other parts of the world, I have heard so many accounts of their wonderful ...
-The Fox in a Plough Furrow.
The hero of Scotch story escaped from his foes by making his way down the course of a stream, that no trace of his footsteps might be found. Equally sagacious ...
-The Fox and the Badger.
Long live Old Ireland! A countryman was making his way along the bank of a mountain stream in Galway, when he caught sight of a badger moving leisurely along a ...
-The Fox and the Hares.
I have still another story to tell about cunning Reynard. Daylight had just broke, when a well-known naturalist, gun in hand, wandering in search of specimens, ...
-Birdie, the Arctic Fox.
I must tell you one more story about a fox, and a very interesting little animal it was, though not less cunning than its relatives in warmer regions. Mr Hayes, ...
-The Polar Bear and her Cubs.
The monarch of the Arctic regions, the monstrous white bear there reigns supreme. Savage and ferocious as is his consort, as well as he, she shows the utmost ...
-The Honey-Seeker and the Bear.
The Indian believes the bear to be possessed not only of a wonderful amount of sagacity, but of feelings akin to those of human beings. Though most species are ...
-The good-natured Bear and the Children.
The brown bear, which lives in Siberia, may be considered among the most good-natured of his tribe. Mr Atkinson, who travelled in that country, tells us that ...
-The wise Hare and her Pursuers.
I will now tell you a story of a very different animal the timid little hare which has to depend for safety, not, like the bear, on strength, but on speed and ...
-The cunning Wolf.
Two hundred years ago there were wolves in Ireland, and it appears that they were as cunning as the foxes of the present day. A man, travelling, as was the ...
-The Tiger and the Pariah-Dog.
I have told you of a friendship formed between a tiger and a dog. I will now narrate another tale, which speaks well for the good feeling of both animals. In ...
-The Doe-Chamois and her Young.
The agile inhabitant of the lofty Alps the graceful chamois shows the greatest affection for her young. A Swiss hunter, while pursuing his dangerous sport, ...
-The captured Wolf.
I have very little to say in favour of wolves. They are generally as cowardly in their adversity as they are savage when at liberty. I give you the following ...
-The tame Otter.
The otter, although not so expert an architect as the beaver, appears to possess more sagacity. A fine one, caught in Scotland, became so tame, that whenever ...
-The Otter and her young ones.
I have another story about an otter, which lived in the Zoological Gardens in London. The otter-pond, surrounded by a wall, was on one occasion only half-full ...
-The wise Beaver.
You have often heard of the wonderful way in which beavers in America construct their habitations and dams. They seem, however, in these operations, to be ...
-The Rat and the Swan.
Rats, in their ferocity, partake of the character of the wolf, and in their cunning, of that of the fox. A great flood occurred some years ago in the north of ...
-The Rats and the Wine-Cask.
An old lady, wealthy and hospitable, lived in a large house, with several servants to attend on her. Although no terrific murder or other dark deed was ever ...
-The Mouse and the Honey-Pot.
Mice, I suspect, are fully as sagacious as rats; perhaps they are more so. In their foraging expeditions what cleverness do they exhibit! When one or two have ...
-The Ewe which returned to her old Home.
I have told you of dogs making their way from one end of the country to the other in search of their masters, and of horses traversing wide districts to the ...
-The Ewe and her Lamb.
There is another story about a ewe which I should like to tell you, and which shows the affection she had for her young. A lamb, frisking about near its mother, ...
-The two wise Goats.
On the crumbling walls of the romantic ruins of Caernarvon Castle, some years ago, two agile goats were seen, now leaping over a rugged gap, now climbing some ...
-The affectionate Seal.
If you have ever examined the head of a seal, with its large gentle eyes, you will readily believe that the animal possesses a certain amount of intellect, and ...

Part VIII: Chapter Eight: Birds

-Birds.
When we observe the small heads and unmeaning eyes of birds, we do not expect to find any great amount of intellect among them. They are, however, moved by the ...
-The Gander and the Bantam-Cock.
A goose was seated on her eggs in a quiet corner, not far from a horse-pond, in a farmyard. Up and down before her strode a game-cock, which, watching the calm ...
-The Farmer and his Goose.
A Cheshire farmer had a large flock of geese. As he was passing through the yard one day, one of the geese quitted its companions and stalked after him. Why it ...
-The blind Woman and her Gander.
Bishop Stanley, who mentions the story, heard of an aged blind woman who used to be led every Sunday to church by a gander, which took hold of her gown with ...
-The Prisoner set free.
Mrs F , who has had much experience with poultry, considers them very sensible and kind-hearted birds. The leg of a young duck had been broken by an accident.
-The two sporting Friends.
My children have a black dog and a jackdaw; and though the bird shows a preference for human companionship, when he cannot obtain that he hops off to the dog s ...
-The two Hens.
In Mrs F s poultry-yard, some duck-eggs had been placed under a Dorking hen. A few days afterwards, a bantam began to sit on her own eggs the nests being close ...
-The wild Turkey and the Dog.
Audubon, the American naturalist, whose statements we can thoroughly trust, once possessed a fine male turkey of the wild breed common in the Western States.
-The brave Hen.
A Spanish hen, in Mrs F s poultry-yard, was sitting on her nest in the hatching-house, which had a small window, through which a person might look to see that ...
-The gallant Swan and his Foe.
Swans show much bravery, especially in defending their young; indeed, from their size, they are able to do battle with the largest of the feathered tribe. They ...
-The Raven and the Bird-Trap.
Ravens are supposed to be the most cunning and sagacious of birds. They are knowing fellows, at all events. Some schoolboys in Ireland used frequently to set ...
-The Raven and the Bird-Trap.
Ravens are supposed to be the most cunning and sagacious of birds. They are knowing fellows, at all events. Some schoolboys in Ireland used frequently to set ...
-The facetious Raven.
A large dog was kept chained in a stable-yard, in the roof of one of the out-buildings of which a raven had his abode. The dog and bird had become great ...
-The Arctic Raven.
Ravens vie with our brave Arctic explorers in the wide circuit they make in their wanderings. When Captain McClure was frozen up in the ice, during his last ...
-The Eagle’s Nest.
Magnificent as the eagle is in appearance, he certainly does not, on the score of intellect, deserve the rank he holds as king of birds. Except that he will ...
-The tame Robins.
What interesting, confiding little birds are the robin redbreasts of our own dear England! It was summer-time. An old lady lay in bed suffering from her last ...
-The affectionate Duck.
A Duck and drake lived together, as husband and wife should do, in the bonds of mutual affection. The poultry-yard being assailed, the drake was carried off by ...
-Old Phil the Sea-Gull.
From the lofty cliffs at the back of the Isle of Wight, numerous wild-fowl may be seen whirling in rapid flight through the air, now rising above the green ...
-The tame Crow.
It is interesting to rear up animals or birds, and to watch their progress as they gain strength and sense, and thus remark their various habits and ...
-The Ostrich and her Young.
The ostrich, which, with its long strides and small wings, traverses the sandy deserts of Africa at a rapid rate, lifting its head on the look-out for danger, ...
-The Blackbirds and Grimalkin.
Two blackbirds had built their nest in the thick bough of a tree which overhung a high paling. Here they fancied themselves secure from the prying eyes of idle ...
-Conclusion.
I have often thought, while writing these stories, of a remark made by one of my boys, whom, when he was a very little fellow, I took to hear a sermon to ...









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