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Booklets on Bee Managements



Various short manuals and informative booklets on bee and apiary management

TitleBooklets on Bee Managements
AuthorVarious Authors
PublisherVarious Publishers
Year
Copyright
AmazonHive Management: A Seasonal Guide for Beekeepers
-Overwintering Of Honey Bee Colonies
Production Research Report No. 169 Agricultural Research Service United States Department Of Agriculture In cooperation with The University of Wisconsin ...
-Overwintering Of Honey Bee Colonies. Part 2. Requirements for Good Overwintering
Colony strength and condition A colony population of adequate strength for winter is a prime requisite. At the close of brood rearing in November, a colony of ...
-Overwintering Of Honey Bee Colonies. Part 3. Honey stores
A full-strength colony of honey bees in most of the northern tier of States and in Canada will require no less than 90 to 100 lb (41 to 46 kg) of honey stores ...
-Overwintering Of Honey Bee Colonies. Part 4
Pollen reserves Todd and Bishop (11) determined that 1 lb (0. 45 kg) of pollen will maintain about 4, 540 bees; and with some 200, 000 bees reared by a colony ...
-Overwintering Of Honey Bee Colonies. Part 5
Wind protection Wind protection is paramount in overwintering colonies. Colonies of bees in nature tend to seek sheltered cavities in which to build their ...
-Overwintering Of Honey Bee Colonies. Part 6. Insuring Successful Overwintering Late summer and fall
During the last 2 weeks of the major honeyflow, colonies should be top supered, that is, add empty supers above the partly filled supers to crowd winter honey ...
-Two-Queen System Of Honey Bee Colony Management
Floyd E. Moeller, research entomologist, Bee Management and Entomology Research, Agricultural Research Service, Madison, Wis. Production Research Report No.
-Two-Queen System Of Honey Bee Colony Management. Organization and Management Of Two-Queen Colonies
Hive equipment In most humid agricultural regions of the country, eight to nine 10-frame 9 1/2-inch deep standard hive bodies are required to provide adequate ...
-Organization and Management Of Two-Queen Colonies. Continued
If standard equipment is used for two-queen management, two brood chambers are necessary for the bottom and two for the top queens. However, either the ...
-Two-Queen System Of Honey Bee Colony Management. Part 3
Queen supersedure and replacements Queen supersedure is usually less evident in two-queen than in single-queen colonies. This occurrence takes place because ...
-Do Bees See In The Dark
By Guy Atherton Are bees, perhaps, able to take advantage of some of the newly discovered rays that penetrate wood and metal? Some speculations and guesses as ...
-Do Bees See In The Dark. Part 2
Nature's Adaptations for Protection It is noteworthy in considering the capacities of beings we regard as much inferior to ourselves that both insects and ...
-Do Bees See In The Dark. Part 3
(Third guess): The bee's eyes are like batteries, but the power to operate them is internal and depends on the nature of the food eaten and the ability of the ...
-Identification And Control Of Honey Bee Diseases
Prepared by II. SHImanUki, Agricultural Research Service Bee diseases are present throughout the United States. They are responsible for large annual losses in ...
-Honey Bee American Foulbrood Disease
Cause American foulbrood, the most widespread and most destructive of the brood diseases in the United States, is caused by a spore-forming germ known as ...
-Honey Bee European Foulbrood Disease
Cause European foulbrood is caused by the germ Streptococcus pluton. These lancet-shaped bacteria are usually present in large numbers in sick and recently ...
-Honey Bee Fungus Diseases
Nurse bees are suspected of transmitting the disease by carrying the virus from cell to cell. It is also believed that robber bees spread the disease by ...
-Adult Bee Diseases
Adult bee diseases are not a threat in this country, except for nosema disease. In some foreign countries, acarine disease poses a potential threat to ...
-Adult Bee Diseases. Continued
Paralysis Cause Paralysis of adult honey bees is a condition brought about by filterable viruses and by poisonous plants. The paralysis discussed here refers ...
-Preventing The Spread Of Bee Diseases
Bee diseases are spread when bees rob a diseased colony. For this reason good management requires that you minimize the opportunity to rob. Bee glue (propolis) ...
-The Home Apiary
By J. F. Eckert The purpose of this leaflet is to call attention to some facts that are fundamental to success in keeping bees, with the information designed ...
-The Home Apiary. Part 2
Shallow supers for comb-honey production should be given to the colony, above a queen excluder, a week or so before the main nectar flow begins. If the colony ...
-The Home Apiary. Part 3
Production of Beeswax The honeybee produces beeswax from honey or sugar sirup, by means of special glands located on the underside of the abdomen. Commercial ...
-Beekeeping for Beginners
United States Home And Prepared By Department Of Garden Bulletin Science And Agriculture Number 158 Education Administration Keeping honey bees is a ...
-Beekeeping for Beginners. Part 2
How to Build a Beehive Factory-made beehives and frames are best. Their parts are of standard size and are interchangeable. If you prefer to build your own ...
-Beekeeping for Beginners. Part 3
How to Manage a Colony As your bee colony grows, it will need more room. If the bees become too crowded and there isn't enough room for expansion of the brood- ...
-The Africanized Honey Bee
Fact Sheet For The Consumer United States Department Of Agriculture The Africanized honey bee. an aggressive hybrid that has spread over large areas of ...
-The Africanized Honey Bee. Continued
Potential For Spread What are the possibilities of the Africanized honey bees reaching the borders of the Southern United States? Not many scientists believe ...









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