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How To Succeed With Bees | by E. W. Atkins and K. Hawkins



This book gives information about how to do beekeeping, and also best practises required for a better production of honey.

TitleHow To Succeed With Bees
AuthorE. W. Atkins and K. Hawkins
PublisherA Jansky Pig. Co., Watertown
Year1924
Copyright1924, E. W. Atkins and K. Hawkins
AmazonHow To Succeed With Bees: More Than 190 Successful Plans To Produce Big Crops Of Honey
-A New Era In Beekeeping
New Year's Day, but not January 1. Under the new era in beekeeping, the honey producer's New Year begins sometime in August instead of January 1. The past season is then history, and more than you ...
-Chapter I. Late Summer Management And Next Year's Honey Crop
1. In this chapter we are attempting to start you at the season of the year when the honey plants will mostly be dead or frost may be expected in eight weeks' time. At that time three fundamental cond...
-Late Summer Management And Next Year's Honey Crop. Part 2
7. It is necessary to requeen toward the end of your last surplus honey flow for two reasons: First, it is seldom feasible to do so in spring before the honey flow in any locality where the season is ...
-Late Summer Management And Next Year's Honey Crop. Part 3
13. Now all good rules fail at times because conditions occasionally work wrong. If the honey flow is a failure in your locality it may not enable you to leave a sufficient quantity of sealed honey pe...
-Late Summer Management And Next Year's Honey Crop. Part 4
19. In taking care that each colony is left with a sufficient supply of honey for winter and spring, it must always be remembered that the greater proportion of the honey left with each colony of bees...
-Late Summer Management And Next Year's Honey Crop. Part 5
24. If combs are to be stored in any considerable numbers, they may be fumigated to prevent destruction by wax moth larvae. Carbon bisulphide may be used with great care as it is highly inflammable wh...
-Chapter II. How To Successfully Winter Bees
28. In the previous chapter we have attempted to show you the great value of correctly managing bees in the late summer in order that the balance of the work you do may not fail to bring your bees thr...
-How To Successfully Winter Bees. Part 2
34. Other things being equal, the most important thing then that you can do to insure the successful wintering of bees, is to afford them ample protection against the cold winter winds. The wind reduc...
-How To Successfully Winter Bees. Part 3
39. Of course it is defenseless to keep bees in hives that are not waterproof, so far as rain or snow are concerned. The finding of hives and combs covered on the inside with mold in spring often stum...
-How To Successfully Winter Bees. Part 4
45. In all this comment about the wintering of bees, it is highly advisable to remember that a bee emerges from her cell in the comb with practically as much latent energy within her body as she will ...
-Question You Should Be Able To Answer
1. How does a windbreak help a colony of bees to winter better? 2. Why may bees be fed 10 pounds of sugar syrup advantageously just before put into winter quarters? 3. Is waterproof packing of a...
-Chapter III. Choice And Assembly Of Equipment
51. Perhaps no more pertinent advice could be given any beekeeper than to urge that in purchasing supplies, he choose equipment that is standard. In the United States, unlike many other countries, equ...
-Choice And Assembly Of Equipment. Part 2
58. Foundation saves the time of the bees, enables them to build their combs faster, eliminates most of the drones, gives straight, even, interchangeable combs, and most important of all, insures that...
-Choice And Assembly Of Equipment. Part 3
63. If the production is to be section comb honey, supers in that style must be chosen for whatever style of hive you determine to use. Again, the consensus of opinion among beekeepers in this country...
-Choice And Assembly Of Equipment. Part 4
70. Although it is universally conceded to be somewhat more difficult for the beginner beekeeper to produce section comb honey than it is extracted or bulk comb honey, in any event the production of s...
-Chapter IV. Spring Management
72. Spring management of bees is the work on the part of the beekeeper designed to assist each colony of bees to build up rapidly with a minimum expenditure of energy. The time when each colony should...
-Spring Management. Part 2
78. You will remember that in paragraph 58 we stressed the value and necessity of using full sheets of foundation in your hives with each sheet supported by wires. At this point it is well to take not...
-Spring Management. Part 3
83. When the warm weather approaches and the colonies gain rapidly in strength, say about fruit bloom time, these two bodies should be reversed, the one that has been above being placed below and the ...
-Chapter V. Control Of Swarming
86. Swarming should be controlled in order to prevent a division of the working force of the colony at a time when its unity is most needed. One cannot hope to successfully produce honey in profitable...
-Control Of Swarming. Part 2
94. Another cause of swarming is insufficient ventilation, depending upon the strength of the colony and the outside temperature. Bees create air currents through their hive to keep the temperature in...
-Control Of Swarming. Part 3
99. Where swarms issue in spite of control measures, it is of absolute importance to prevent more swarms issuing from each such colony. Normally when a swarm issues, the hive will contain a number of ...
-Control Of Swarming. Part 4
5. What procedure after swarming will usually prevent further swarming from the parent colony? 6. What becomes of field bees who return to a hive that has been placed in a new location since they l...
-Chapter VI. How To Produce Section Comb Honey
103. The primary requirement for the production of section comb honey is a strong colony of bees. Much is lost in attempting the production of honey in any locality, no matter how advantageous the hon...
-How To Produce Section Comb Honey. Part 2
112. When the bee escape is used in preference to shaking, the top hive body should be removed in three weeks from the day it was placed above the escape board. If the honey flow is not over then plac...
-How To Produce Section Comb Honey. Part 3
118. As the approach of the end of the honey flow comes, the bees should be crowded in the sections as much as possible in order to cause them to complete filling as many sections as they can. The tre...
-How To Produce Section Comb Honey. Part 4
Questions You Should Be Able To Answer 1. Why is it essential to have strong colonies of bees? 2. How are bees gotten off their combs? 3. What is the object in dividing colonies into two grou...
-Chapter VII. How To Produce Extracted Honey
122. The manipulation of bees both for the production of extracted honey and swarm control, is so different from the methods followed in producing section comb honey, it is advisable to devote an enti...
-How To Produce Extracted Honey. Part 2
128. Refer to illustrations 1, 2, and 3 to see the difference in appearance between the queen, a drone, and a worker. If the bees have been carefully handled and a minimum of smoke used up to this poi...
-How To Produce Extracted Honey. Part 3
133. This manipulation alone is seldom sufficient for the complete control of swarming, even where an adequate number of supers is at all times thereafter supplied above the excluder. One more operati...
-How To Produce Extracted Honey. Part 4
139. When removing the honey leave one body well filled on the hive, preferably the first body filled during the season. While this will usually be fine light colored valuable honey, you will find by ...
-How To Produce Extracted Honey. Part 5
11. What are the objects of placing an extracting super above the queen excluder when bees are Demareed? 12. What may happen in some localities if the queen cells are not destroyed in upper hive wh...
-Chapter VIII. How To Increase Your Colonies
144. The first principle to keep in mind in increasing your colonies of bees is to choose one of four methods that shall be least expensive. 145. The three commonly practiced methods are: first, th...
-How To Increase Your Colonies. Part 2
152. The brood of bees is subject to diseases which may be transmitted if the brood is shipped from a locality where the disease exists into a locality where it does not exist. Because packages are no...
-How To Increase Your Colonies. Part 3
157. Package handling instructions. With the hive in the position where it is to remain permanently, place the package in the hive as explained in paragraph 155. Do this as quietly as possible and wit...
-How To Increase Your Colonies. Part 4
163. If a package is not building up fast enough the first assistance it needs, if it has a prolific queen, will likely be food. It is expensive to feed any kind of food to bees, either sugar syrup or...
-How To Increase Your Colonies. Part 5
12. What is the best time of day to place packages or nuclei in hives previously prepared for them? 13. How can you tell if a queen came along with packages if ordered? How can you tell when she...
-Chapter IX. Odds And Ends Around The Apiary
167. Every beekeeper has to learn to know when the bees are likely to rob other hives, to recognize robbing when he sees it, and to learn how to control it. Bees are always looking for an opportunity ...
-Odds And Ends Around The Apiary. Part 2
173. Perhaps next to the danger of spreading diseases of bee larvae, the greatest loss will be of weak colonies or package bees only recently placed in the hive, and which you are attempting to build ...
-Odds And Ends Around The Apiary. Part 3
180. Slide the mailing cage screen side up under the open end of the screen cage so that the open hole in the end of the mailing cage is under the wire screen and so that no bees can get in or out at ...
-Odds And Ends Around The Apiary. Part 4
186. An interesting thing sometimes occurs in a colony when it loses its queen and finds itself without brood from which to rear another and is not given another queen by the beekeeper. What are ...
-Odds And Ends Around The Apiary. Part 5
Questions You Should Be Able To Answer 1. How can you tell whether a colony of bees is being robbed? 2. What is the chief danger resulting from robbing? 3. How do you plan to go about your ap...









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previous page: Honey Getting | by Edward Lloyd Sechrist
  
page up: Bees, Bee Keeping and Honey Making
  
next page: A Living From Bees | by Frank C. Pellett