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Bird Guide to Water Birds, Game Birds And Birds Of Prey East Of The Rockies | by Chester A. Reed



To identify a bird when you see it, and where you see it, this little pocket "Bird Guide" is prepared. May it be the medium for saving many of today's seekers for "bird truths," from the many trials and tribulations willingly encountered, and hard and thorny roads gladly traveled by the author in his quest for knowledge of bird ways.

TitleBird Guide: Water Birds, Game Birds And Birds Of Prey East Of The Rockies
AuthorChester A. Reed
PublisherDoubleday, Page & Co
Year1906
Copyright1906, Chaster K. Reed
AmazonThe Bird Book

By Chester A. Reed, Author of North American Birds' Eggs, and, with Frank M. Chapman, of Color Key to North American Birds. Curator in Ornithology, Worcester Natural History Society.

-Preface
While strolling through a piece of woodland, or perhaps along the marsh or seashore, we see a bird, a strange bird, - one we never saw before. Instantly, our curiosity is aroused, and the question ari...
-Introduction
The study of the birds included in this book, is much more difficult than that of the small land birds. Many of the birds are large; some are very rare; all are usually shy and have keen eyesight, tra...
-A Plea To Sportsmen
Many of the birds shown in this book are Game Birds, that is, birds that the law allows you to shoot at certain seasons of the year. Some of these are still abundant and will be for numbers of years; ...
-Bird Orders
Order 1. Diving Birds - Pygopodes Loons - Family Gaviidop Larger than Grebes; bill, long, heavy and pointed; tail very short; feet webbed like a duck's, but legs thin and deep; form and habits, ...
-Part I. Water Birds, Game Birds and Birds of Prey. Diving Birds - Order Pygopodes. Grebes - Famaily Colymbidae. Western Grebe
1. Aechmophorus occidentalis. 25 to 29 inches. All grebes have lobate-webbed feet, that is each toe has its individual web, being joined to its fellow only for a short distance at the base. This...
-Holbcell Grebe
2. Colymbus holboelli. 19 inches. This is next to the Western Grebe in size, both being much larger than any of our others. In summer, they are very handsomely marked with a reddish brown neck, sil...
-Horned Grebe
3. Colymbus auritus. 14 inches. As is usual with grebes, summer brings a remarkable change in the dress of these birds. The black, puffy head is adorned with a pair of buffy white ear tufts and the...
-American Eared Grebe
4. Colymbus nigricollis californicus. 13 inches. This is a western species rarely found east of the Mississippi. In summer, it differs from the last in having the entire neck black: in winter it ca...
-Least Or St. Domingo Grebe
5. Colymbus dominions brachypterus. 10 inches. This is much smaller than any others of our grebes; in breeding plumage it most nearly resembles the following species, but the bill is black and shar...
-Pied-Billed Grebe
6. Podilymbus podiceps. 13.5 inches. In any plumage this species cannot be mistaken for others, because of its stout compressed bill and brown iris; all the others have red eyes. In summer the bill...
-Loons - Famaily Gavidae. Loon; Great Northern Diver
7. Gavia immer. 31 to 35 inches. In form, loons resemble large grebes, but their feet are full webbed like those of a duck; they have short, stiff tails and long, heavy, pointed bills. They have no...
-Black-Throated Loon
9. Gavia arctica. 28 inches. This loon lives in the Arctic regions and only rarely is found, in winter, in Northern United States. In summer, it can readily be distinguished from the common loon by...
-Red-Throated Loon
11. Gavia stellata. 25 inches. Besides being smaller than the common loon, this species has a more slender bill, which has a slightly up-turned appearance owing to the straight top to the upper man...
-Auks, Murres And Puffins - Famaily Alcidae
13. Fratercula arctica. 13 inches. Puffins are grotesque birds, with short legs, stout bodies and very large, thin bills, that of the common Puffin being 2 in. in length and about the same in heigh...
-Black Guillemot; Sea Pigeon
27. Cepphus grylle. 13 inches. These birds are very abundant about the rocky islands from Maine northward. They may be seen sitting in rows on the edges of the rocks, or pattering along the water a...
-Murre
30. Uria troille. 16 inches. In summer the throat is brownish black, but in winter the throat and sides of head are white; feet blackish bill, long and stout, 1.7 in. long, while that of Brunnieh M...
-Razor-Billed Auk
32. Alca torda. 16.5 inches. Similar in size and form to the murre, but with a short, deep, thin black bill, crossed by a white line. In summer, with a white line from the eye to top of bill, and w...
-Great Auk
33. Plautus impennis. 29 inches. This largest of the auks lived, as far as we have authentic record, until 1844, when it became extinct, largely through the agency of man. Although nearly twice as ...
-Dovekie; Sea Dove
34. Alle alle. 8 inches. These little auks, called ice birds by the fishermen, are very abundant in the far north. In summer, they have a blackish brown throat and breast, but they are never seen...
-Long-Winged Swimmers - Order Longipennes. Skuas And Jaegers - Famaily Stercorariidae. Skua
35. Megalestris skua. 22 inches. These large birds are the most powerful ana audacious pirates among the sea fowl of northern waters. Their whole form is indicative of strength; form robust, feet s...
-Pomarine Jaeger
36. Stercorarius pomarinus. 21 inches. Jaegers are more slender in form than the Skuas, but like them are piratical in their habits, preying chiefly upon terns. Off Chatham, Mass., I have often wat...
-Parasitic Jaeger
37. Stercorarius parasiticus. 17 in. Two phases of color, both similar to those of the last, but the central pair of tail feathers are pointed and project about 4 in. beyond the others; bill 1.4 in...
-Long-Tailed Jaeger
38. Stercorarius longicaudus. 21 in. Like the last species, but with the pointed central tail feathers projecting 8 or 10 in. and with a shorter bill (1.15 in.) and the nostril about midway of its ...
-Gulls And Terns - Famaily Laridae. Ivory Gull
39. Pagophila alba. 17 in. Entirely pure white with the shafts of the primaries yellowish; bill dark at base and yellow at tip; eyes brown, surrounded by a narrow red ring; feet black. Young birds ...
-Kittiwake
40. Rissa tridactyla. 16 in. In summer, with plumage white, except the gray back and wings, and solid black tips to the primaries; in winter, the sides and back of the head are washed with the colo...
-Glaucus Gull
42. Larus hyperboreus. 28 in. Plumage white with a pearl gray mantle; no black in the plumage, the primaries being white or grayish; bill and eye yellow, the former with a red spot at the end of th...
-Iceland Gull
43. Larus leucopterus. 25 in. Plumage exactly like that of the Glaucus Gull but the birds are smaller and are found farther north. Range. - Breeds in Greenland and winters south to Northern New ...
-Kumlien Gull
45. Larus kumlieni. 27 in. Plumage very similar to that of the Iceland and Glaucus Gulls, but with the primaries conspicuously gray, with white tips. As usual with the gull family, this species fee...
-Great Black-Backed Gull
47. Larus marinus. 29 in. Largest and most powerful of our gulls. Adults in summer have the head, tail and underparts white, back slaty black, eyes and bill yellow, with a red spot near the tip of ...
-Herring Gull
51. Larus argentatus. 24 in. Adults in summer, white, with gray mantle, and black primaries tipped with white. In winter, the head and neck are streaked below with grayish brown. Bills of adults, y...
-Ring-Billed Gull
54. Larus delawarensis. 18 in. Adults in summer. - White with pearl gray mantle; ends of outer primaries black with white tips; eye yellow; feet and bill greenish-yellow, the latter crossed by a bl...
-Laughing Gull
58. Larus atricilla. 16 in. Largest of the black-headed gulls. Bill and feet carmine-red; primaries wholly black or only with slight white tips; eye brown; in breeding season, with the underparts t...
-Franklin Gull
59. Larus franklini. 15 in. Adult in summer. - Hood dark; mantle lighter than the last species; primaries gray with black ends broadly tipped with white; underparts rosy; bill and feet red, the for...
-Bonaparte Gull
60. Larus Philadelphia. 14 in. Adult in summer. - Hood lighter gray and not as extensive as in the last two species; bill slender and black; feet coral red; primaries white with black tips and oute...
-Ross Gull; Wedge-Tailed Gull
61. Rhodostethia rosea. 13 in. Bill short and slender; tail wedge-shaped. Adults in summer. - With no hood, but with narrow black collar; mantle light pearl; primaries wholly white with the excepti...
-Sabine Gull
62. Xema sabini. 14 in. Tail slightly forked; bill small and black, tipped with yellow. Adults in summer. - Head with a slaty-gray hood, edged with a black ring around the neck; outer primaries bla...
-Gull-Billed Tern
63. Gelochelidon nilotica. 14 in. Differs from all other terns in the shape of its black bill, which is stout, but with the upper mandible not hooked nor curved, as in the gulls. Tail forked about ...
-Caspian Tern
64. Sterna caspia. 21 in. Largest of our terns. Bill heavy and bright red; head crested; tail forked about 1.5 in.; eyes brown. Adults in summer have the crown and occipital crest glossy black. Win...
-Royal Tern
65. Sterna maxima. 19 in. Similar to the last, but smaller; bill more slender; tail forked 3.5 in. Nest. - A hollow in the sand. The 2 or 3 eggs are creamy buff, with distinct blackish-brown spo...
-Cabot Tern
67. Sterna sandvicensis acuflavida. 16 in. Head crested; bill and feet blackish, the former with a yellow tip. Adults have the crown glossy black. Young birds, and winter adults, have the crown mix...
-Trudeau Tern
69. Sterna trudeaui. 14 in. This is a rare South American species, described by Audubon as having occurred in New Jersey and New York. It has the form of the Forster Tern, a bright yellow bill and ...
-Forster Tern
69. Sterna forsteri. 15 in. No crest on this or any of the following terns. Tail forked 4 in.; below pure white. In summer, with bill and feet orange red; crown black. In winter, the crown is white...
-Common Tern
70. Sterna hirundo. 15 in. Mantle darker than that of any of the similar terns; washed with grayish below; bill and feet bright red, the former shading to black on the tip; tail less deeply forked ...
-Arctic Tern
71. Sterna paradiscea. 15.5 in. Similar to the Common Tern, but tail longer (forked 4.5 in.) and bill wholly red. In winter, bill and feet dark, as are those of the others. Range. - Breeds from ...
-Roseate Tern
72. Sterna dougalli. 15.5 in. This species is the most gracefully formed of the terns. The tail is 7.5 in. long, forked to a depth of 5.25 in. In summer, the bill is blackish, changing to red only ...
-Least Tern
74. Sterna antillarum. 9 in. Smallest of our terns. Adult in summer. - Crown, nape, and line through the eye, black; forehead and line above the eye, white; bill and feet yellow, the former black a...
-Sooty Tern
75. Sterna fuscata. 17 in. Adult in summer. - Above sooty-black, except the white outer tail feathers. Crown, line through the eye, bill and feet, black; forehead and underparts white; eve red. You...
-Bridled Tern
76. Sterna anaetheta. 15 in. Similar to the last, but the back and wings much lighter, and the white of the forehead extends over the eyes; nape whitish. Range. - Breeds north to the Bahamas. ...
-Black Tern
77. Hydrochelidon nigra surinamensis. 10 in. Adults in summer with the head, neck and underparts, black; back, wings and tail, dark gray; eyes brown. In winter, the forehead, neck and underparts ar...
-Noddy
79. Anous stolidus. 15 in. Adults with the crown silvery-white, the rest of the plumage being sooty-brown; the bill, feet and line to the eye are black. The plumage of these beautiful birds is very...
-Skimmers - Famaily Rynchopidae. Black Skimmer
80. Rynchops nigra. 18 in. These strange birds are not apt to be mistaken for any other. They are locally abundant on the South Atlantic coast as far north as Virginia. Their flight is swift and mo...
-Tube-Nosed Swimmers - Order Tubinares. Shearwaters - Famaily Procellaridae. Fulmar
86. Fulmarus glacialis. 19 in. Bill short and stout, compared to that of the shearwaters, strongly hooked at the tip and with the nostrils opening out of a single tube, prominently located on the t...
-Cory Shearwater
88. Pufjinus borealis. 21 in. This rare bird is found off the coast of New England and in Long Island Sound from July to September. It is slightly larger than the similar Greater Shearwater, the ba...
-Audubon Shearwater
02. Puffinus Iherminieri. 12 in. This small shearwater, except in point of size, is quite similar to the following, but the under parts are white, except the under tail coverts which are sooty; the...
-Greater Shearwater
89. Puffinus gravis. 20 in. Entire upper parts, top and sides of head, bill and feet, grayish or brownish-black; middle of belly and under tail coverts dusky. This species is the most abundant of t...
-Sooty Shearwater
94. Puffinus griseus. 17 in. Sooty grayish-black all over except the under wing coverts, which are whitish; eye brown, bill and feet black. A few of these may usually be seen with flocks of the Gre...
-Stormy Petrel
104. Thalassidroma pelagica. 5.5 in. Smallest of our petrels, and darker than either the Leach or Wilson; tail square; upper tail coverts white. tipped with black. This species is rare on the co...
-Wilson Petrel
109. Oceanites oceanicus. 7 in. Tail square at end; coverts white, not tipped with black; legs long, with yellow webs. This species is very abundant on our Atlantic coast from July to Sept.. spendi...
-Leach Petrel
106. Oceanodroma leucorhoa. 8 in. Tail forked; tail coverts white, not tipped with black; legs much shorter than those of Wilson Petrel, which is the only other common species on our eastern coasts...
-Totipalmate Swimmers - Order Steganopodes. Tropic Bird - Famaily Phaethontidae. Yellow-Billed Tropic Bird
112. Phoethon americanus. 30 to 34 in. Form tern-like, but with the central tail feathers much lengthened (about 18 in.); legs short and not very strong; all four toes connected by webs. These b...
-Gannets - Famaily Sulidae. Blue-Faced Booby
114. Sula cyanops. 28 in. Bill, face and naked throat pouch, slaty-blue; eye yellow; feet reddish. Plumage white except the primaries, secondaries and other tail feathers, which are black. Young bi...
-Booby
115. Hula leucogastra. 30 in. This species, commonly called the Brown Booby, is brownish black with the exception of a white breast and underparts. Young birds are entirely brownish black; bill and...
-Gannet
117. Sula bassana. 35 in. Primaries black: rest of plumage white; back of head tinged with straw color; bill and feet bluish black. Young grayish or brownish black, mottled above and streaked below...
-Darters - Famaily Anhingdae. Anhinga; Snake Bird
118. Anhinga anhinga. 35 in. Adult male with a glossy greenish-black head, neck and underparts, the neck being covered behind, in breeding season, with numerous filamentous, whitish plumes. Female ...
-Cormorants - Famaily Phalacrocoracidae. Cormorant
119. Phalacrocorax carbo. 36 in. Largest of our cormorants; tail with 14 feathers. Adults with glossy black head, neck and underparts; in breeding season with white plumes on the neck and a white p...
-Double-Crested Cormorant
120. Phalacrocoraox auritus. 30 in. Tail with 12 feathers; distinguished from the last species in any plumage by the shape of the gular sac; on the common Cormorant the feathers on the throat exten...
-Mexican Cormorant
121. Phalacrocorax vigua mexicanus. 25 in. Adults with feathers bordering on the gular sac, white. In breeding plumage, the sides of head and neck have tufts of filmy white feathers, eyes green, as...
-Pelicans - Famaily Pelecanidae. White Pelican
125. Pelecanus- erythrorhynchus. 5 feet. White with black primaries. Eye white; bill and feet yellow, the former in the breeding season being adorned with a thin upright knob about midway on the to...
-Brown Pelican
126. Pelecanus occidentalis. 4.5 feet. Pouch greenish; eye white; back of neck in breeding season, rich velvety brown; at other seasons the whole head is white. These pelicans nest abundantly on so...
-Man-O'-War Birds - Famaily Fregatidae. Man-O'-War Bird; Frigate Bird
128. Fregata aquila. 40 in. Eye brown; bill long, comparatively slender, and flesh colored; gular sac orange; feet small and weak, with the four toes joined by webs. Frigate birds are strictly mari...
-Order Anseres. American Merganser
129. Mergus americanus. 25 in. Bill, feet and eye red in male, the former with a black stripe along the top; plumage black and white, with a greenish-black head; no crest. Female gray and white, wi...
-Red-Breasted Merganser
130. Mergus serrator. 22 in. Eye. bill and foot red. like those of the last species, but the head is crested on the male, as well as the female, and a band across his breast is mixed rusty and blac...
-Hooded Merganser
131. Lophodytes cucullatus. 17 in. Bill short compared to those of other mergansers, and black. It is not apt to be mistaken for any other duck, because of its small size and the large crest with w...
-Mallard
132. Anas platyrhynchos. 23 in. Male. - Head, green; speculum purplish-blue; bill olive-green; legs orange; eyes brown. The female most closely resembles the Black Duck but is lighter colored. more...
-Black Duck
133. Anas rubripes. 22 in. General plumage mottled blackish, the feathers having lighter edges; throat, buffy, streaked with blackish; crown and line through eye, nearly solid blackish; speculum bl...
-Florida Duck
134. Anas fulvigula. 21 in. Much lighter than the Black Duck, all the feathers being broadly margined with buffy; throat nearly clear buffy without markings. The habits of this species, which is re...
-Gadwall
135. Chaulelasmus streperus. 20 in. Male with chestnut wing coverts and white speculum; lining of wings white; eyes brown. The female is similar, but the back and wings are brownish-gray and the sp...
-Widgeon
Mareca penelope. 19 in. Crown buffy; head reddish brown; wing coverts white; speculum green. Female with blackish speculum, and a pale, rusty head, neck, breast and sides, streaked or barred with b...
-Baldpate; American Widgeon
137. Mareca americana. 19 in. Wing coverts and top of head white; rest of head and neck finely specked with black; speculum and broad stripe back of eye, green; female, similar but with the whole h...
-Green-Winged Teal
139. Nettion carolinense. 14 in. Head reddish-brown; speculum and large patcli back of eye, green; a white crescent in front of wing. Female with the head and neck whitish, finely streaked with dus...
-Blue-Winged Teal
140. Querquedula discors. 15.5 in. Male. - Head gray, with a white crescent in front of the eye; underparts buffy, heavily spotted with black; wing coverts blue; speculum green. Female similar to t...
-Cinnamon Teal
141. Querquedula cyanoptera. 16 in. Male with the whole head, neck and underparts bright cinnamon; wings as in the Blue-winged species. Female similar to the female Blue-wing, but more rusty below,...
-Shoveller
142. Spatula clypeata. 20 in. Bill long, and much broader at the tip than at the base; head and speculum green; belly reddish-brown; breast and back, white; wing coverts, pale blue; eye yellow; fee...
-Pintail
143. Dafila acuta. 22 in. Tail pointed, and. in the male, with the two central feathers considerably lengthened; neck unusually long and slender for a duck; form more slender than that of other duc...
-Wood Duck
144. Aix sponsa. 19 in. Head crested in both sexes, the feathers being especially lengthened on the nape. No other American duck that can possibly be mistaken for them. The male Wood Duck is the mo...
-Redhead
146. Marila americana. 19 in. Note the shape of the bill of this species, as compared to that of the similarly colored Canvas-back. The male Redhead has a bluish bill with a black tip, and his back...
-Canvas-Back
147. Marila vallisneria. 21 in. Differs from the Redhead in the shape of its black bill, its blackish forehead, very light back and red eyes. The female has the back grayish-brown, finely barred wi...
-American Scaup Duck
148. Marila marila. 18 in. Head black, glossed with greenish; speculum white; bill dull bluish; eye yellow. Female resembles that of the Redhead, but has a white speculum. These ducks are perhaps b...
-Lesser Scaup Duck
149. Marila affinis. 17 in. Slightly smaller than the last, and with the head of the male glossed purple instead of green. Range. - Breeding range same as that of the last: winters in the southe...
-Ring-Necked Duck
150. Marila collaris. 17 in. Male with a narrow chestnut neck ring; head glossed with purple; back black; chin white; bill blackish, with a bluish band near the end; eye yellow. Female with white c...
-Buffle-Head
153. Charitonetta albeola. 14 in. Head iridescent with green, purple and blue, and with a large white patch extending from eye to eye. across the back of the puffy crest. Female with a white patch ...
-American Golden-Eye
151. Clangula clangula americana. 20 in. Head puffy, or slightly crested. Male with greenish head and a round white spot between bill and eye. Female with a brownish head and white speculum. Not...
-Barrow Golden-Eye
152. Clangula islandica. 20 in. Head bluish with a white crescent at base of bill; aye bright yellow in both this and the last species; female practically indistinguishable from the preceding, alth...
-Old Squaw; Long-Tailed Duck
154. Harelda hyemalis. 21; 16 in. This species is one of the very few ducks that change their plumages in summer and winter. The female is marked similarly to the male but is very m...
-Harlequin Duck
155. Histrionicus histrionicus. 17 in. Male very oddly and handsomely marked, as shown; female blaekish-brown, lighter below and with a whitish spot before and one behind each eye. During the winte...
-Labrador Duck
156. Camptorhynchus labradorius. 20 in. Male with the head, breast and wings, white; narrow stripe over the top of the head and down the back of the neck, ring around the neck, back, primaries and ...
-Northern Eider
150. Somateria mollissima borealis. 23 in. Base of bill extends on either side of forehead in a point, a mark that will distinguish it from the next and very similar species, in any plumage. The fe...
-American Eider
100. Somateria dresseri. 23 in. This is the Eider that is usually seen on the Atlantic coast and is the only one that breeds south of Labra-dor. The base of the bill, that encroaches on either side...
-King Eider
162. Somateria spectabilis. 23 in. The feathers of the sides of the bill of this specie-do not reach to the nostril, while in the two preceding ones, they do. This is the chief point of difference ...
-American Scoter
163. Oidemia americana. 19 in. Adult male, entirely black; bill black with enlarged base yellow; eye brown. Female plain brownish-black, lighter below. All the Scoters are better known to sportsmen...
-White-Winged Scoter
105. Oidemia deglandi. 22 in. This species is the most abundant of the Scoters wintering off the New England coast, where they congregate in immense rafts, floating off shore. Nest. - Conceale...
-Surf Scoter
106. Oidemia perspicillata. 20 in. Male black with a white patch on top of the head and another on the nape; eye white; bill red. white and yellow, with a large black spot near the base. Female a u...
-Ruddy Duck
167. Erismatura jamaicensis. 15 in. Bill short, broad, with an upturned appearance; tail feathers very narrow, stiff and pointed. Male in summer, with black crown, whitish cheeks, throat and belly,...
-Lesser Snow Goose
169. Chen hypeboreus. 25 in. Plumage entirely white; ends of primaries black; top and back of head sometimes tinged with rusty, bill and feet red.; eye brown. This variety is like the next, which i...
-Greater Snow Goose
169a. C. h. nivalis. 33 in. . Snow Geese travel in large flocks, the same as do the Canada Geese, led by an old male that has traveled the airy road many times before. At times, flocks are seen on ...
-Blue Goose
109.1. Chen caerulescens. 28 in. Head and neck white, often tinged with rusty on the face; underparts brownish-gray. Young birds are similar but the head is brownish; bill and feet reddish; eye bro...
-American White-Fronted Goose
171a. Anser albifrons gambeli. 28 in. Forehead, white; head and neck gray; under parts mixed black and white; feet yellow, bill pinkish; eye brown. These geese reach the U. S. on their return from ...
-Canada Goose
172. Branta canadensis. 38 in. The best known and most widely distributed of our geese. In the northern states they are always eagerly looked for in the Spring, for then arrival is a sure indicatio...
-Brant
17.3a. Branta bernicla glaucogastra. 26 in. Head, back and breast black, sharply defined against the grayish-white of the underparts; a whitish patch on either side of the neck. They are very abund...
-Black-Bellied Tree Duck
177. Dendrocygna autumnalis. 22 in. Legs and neck long; bill and feet pinkish; eye brown; head and neck chiefly gray; breast and back brownish; belly and under tail coverts, black; wing-coverts whi...
-Fulvous Tree Duck
178. Dendrocygna bicolor. 22 in. Form like that of the last, but with the head. neck. rump and underparts rusty, and with no white in the wings. The Fulvous Duck is much more abundant in the United...
-Whistling Swan
180. Olor columbianus. 54 in. Nostril situated at a greater distance from the eye than it is from the end of the bill; a small yellow spot on the bare space in front of the eye; plumage entirely wh...
-Trumpeter Swan
181. Trumpeter Swan(Olor bucinator) is larger (65 in.) and is found west of the Miss. It breeds from Ia., northwards. Nostril midway between eye and tip of bill. ...
-Order Odontoglossae - Flamingoes - Family Phoenicopteridae. Flamingo
182. Phoenicopterus ruber. 46 in. These large, beautiful birds are found in Southern Florida, and casually north to South Carolina, but it is doubtful if they breed within our limits. They fly ...
-Herons, Storks, Ibises - Order Herodiones - Family Plataleidae. Roseate Spoonbill
183. Ajaia ajaja. 33 in. Head entirely bald in adults, and only feathered to the eyes in young birds; bill long, thin, flat and very much broadened at the end, variously colored with green, blue ...
-Ibises - Famaily Ibididae. White Ibis
184. Guara alba. 25 in. Tips of primaries black; plumage, otherwise, entirely white; bill, face and legs, orange red or carmine. Young with head and neck, and more or less of the body. brownish or ...
-Scarlet Ibis
185. Guara rubra. 25 in. This beautiful species is wholly bright scarlet, except for the black primaries; young birds are found in all stages of plumage from the brownish-gray and white of the ...
-Glossy Ibis
186. Plegadis autumnalis. 25 in. Like the next, which is our common species, but with the feathers about the face not white, as in that species. Range. - Tropical America, casually north to ...
-White-Faced Glossy Ibis
187. Plegadis guarauna. 24 in. Bill, face and legs, carmine red; feathers bordering the face, white; wings and tail glossy greenish-black; rest of plumage rich chestnut-brown, glossed with purple ...
-Storks - Famaily Ciconidae. Wood Ibis
188. Mycteria americana. 40 to 46 in. Entire head unfeathered and covered with scales; both head and legs are pale bluish in color; eye brown; plumage entirely white except for the glossy purplish-...
-Bitterns, Etc - Famaily Ardeidae. American Bittern
190. Botaurus lentiginosus. 28 in. Much variegated with brown and yellowish-brown: adults with a long, broad, black stripe on either side of the white throat; eye yellow; legs and base of bill ...
-Least Bittern
191. lxobrychus exilis. 13 in. Male with the crown and back glossy black; female with these areas hair-brown, and streaked with brown below. These diminutive little bitterns are very shy and ...
-Cory Least Bittern
191.1. lxobrychus neoxynus. 13 in. This extremely rare little bittern is of the same size and form as the common species. The crown, back, wing-feathers and tail are black, and the rest of the ...
-Great White Heron
192. Ardea occidentalis. 50 in. This is the largest heron that we get in North America, surpassing even the Great Blue. Its plumage is entirely white; no aigrettes on the back, but two white ...
-Great Blue Heron
194. Ardea herodias. 48 in. Adult Blue Herons are very handsome birds, as may be seen in the illustration. Young birds, and nine out of ten that we see will be young birds, are much duller colored ...
-American Egret
196. Herodias egretta. 41 in. Entirely white, with no plumes on the head but with a long train of straight aigrette plumes growing from the middle of the back; bill and eye, yellow; legs and ...
-Snowy Heron
197. Egretta candidissima. 24 in. Plumage white; in breeding season with numerous recurved plumes growing from the middle of the back; long crest of plumes on the back of the head, and on the ...
-Reddish Egret
198. Dichromanassa rufescens. 29 in. Two color phases, the gray being the most common: - Head and neck, including plumes on neck and breast, reddish-brown; rest of plumage gray, the plumes on the ...
-Louisiana Heron
199. Hydranassa tricolor ruficollis. 26 in. In breeding plumage, with short plumes on the back, extending three or four inches beyond the tips of the wings. Throat, front line of neck, and ...
-Little Blue Heron
200. Florida caerulea. 22 in. Head and neck, maroon; rest of plumage slaty-blue: plumes on back of head, breast and on the back; eyes yellow; bill and feet greenish. Young birds are white, usually ...
-Green Heron
201. Butorides virescens. 17 in. Smallest of the family, except the Least Bittern. In breeding plumage, they are one of the most beautiful of herons. They may be found in marshes; along creeks or ...
-Black-Crowned Night Heron
202. Nycticorax nycticorax naevius. 24 in. Bill much heavier than that of the herons; neck and legs shorter and stouter; eye red; hill black; legs and bare space in front of eye, pale yellowish-...
-Yellow-Crowned Night Heron
203. Kyctanassa violacea. 23 in. Like the last species, the head of this one is adorned with three long, rounded, white plumes; in life these plumes are rarely separated, but are nested together ...
-Cranes, Rails, Etc - Order Paludicolae. Cranes - Famaily Gruidae. Whooping Crane
204. Grus americana. 50 in. Plumage white, with black primaries; the inner wing feathers greatly lengthened, making a flowing train. Head of adult, largely bare, carmine colored, and with a few ...
-Little Brown Crane
205. Grus canadensis. 36 in. Like the next and better known species, but smaller and browner, especially on the wings. Range. - Breeds in the interior of Northern Canada; migrates, west of the ...
-Sandhill Crane
206. Grus mexicana. 44 in. Plumage entirely grayish with a few brownish feathers; bare skin on top of head, red. These cranes are locally distributed in the Gulf States, and in the inte-rior north ...
-Courlans - Famaily Aramidae. Limpkin
207. Aramus vociferus. 27 in. These singular birds are the connecting link between the cranes and the rails. They are rarely seen in flocks. usually living a secluded life in pairs. They are often ...
-Rails, Gallinules And Coots - Famaily Rallidae. King Rail
208. Rallus elegans. 18 in. Back handsomely patterned with black, olive-brown and gray; wing coverts reddish-brown; neck and breast, rich cinnamon-brown, brightest on the breast. Sides sharply ...
-Clapper Rail
211. Rallus crepitans. 15 in. General color above olive-grayish, with no strong black markings; breast pale brown; flanks barred with gray and white. This species is found almost exclusively in ...
-Virginia Rail
212. Rallus virginianus. 9.5 in. Coloration almost exactly like that of the King Rail, but the bird is much smaller. Like that species, this one prefers fresh water marshes. They have a great ...
-Carolina Rail; Sora
214. Porzana Carolina. 8.5 in. Adults with the face and throat black. Young with no black on the head. This species is not apt to be confused with any, except, possibly, the Virginia Rail, which ...
-Yellow Rail
215. Coturnicops noveboracensis. 7 in. This is a handsome bird, the entire plumage having a glossy lustre. The back is blackish, with all the feathers edged with white, while the head, neck and ...
-Black Rail
216. Creciscus jamaicensis. 5 in. Much smaller than any of our other rails; very dark. Notes. - A peculiar, loud clicking sound. Nest. - Of grass and rushes, well cupped to receive the 6 to ...
-Purple Gallinule
218. lonornis martinicus. 13 in. Bill shorter and stouter than that of the rails, and with a hard shield at the base, that extends on the forehead to the top of the head. This species is ...
-Florida Gallinule
210. Gallinula galeata. 13 in. Bill and crown plate, red, tipped with yellow; legs greenish with a red ring around the top; plumage gray changing to blackish on the head and neck. Florida ...
-American Coot
221. Fulica americana. 15 in. Bill and frontal shield as in the gallinules, but the bill is whitish with a blackish ring near the tip; each individual toe is furnished with a large scalloped web: ...
-Shore Birds - Order Limicolae. Phalaropes - Famaily Phalaropodidae. Red Phalarope
222. Phalaropus fulicarius. 8 in. Bill heavier than any of the other phalaropes; feet lobate-webbed. Adults in summer have the entire under-parts reddish brown; side of head white; upper parts ...
-Northern Phalarope
223. Lobipes lobatus. 7.5 in. Bill short and slender. Female in summer with reddish-brown breast; gray upper parts mixed with white and buff; throat and belly, white. Male, similar but duller ...
-Wilson Phalarope
224. Steganopus tricolor. 9 in. Bill long and slender. Female in summer with a black line through eye, shading into a broad stripe of rich chestnut on the sides of the neck. Male much duller ...
-Avocets And Stilts - Famaily Recurvirostridae. American Avocet
225. Recurvirostra americana. 17 in. Bill slender and recurved; feet webbed; feathers on the underparts very thick and duck-like, being impervious to water. In summer, the head and neck are pale ...
-Black-Necked Stilt
226. Himantopus mexicanus. 15 in. Legs extremely long, and bright red; neck and bill moderately long and slender. Male black and white as shown; female and young with the back brownish. These very ...
-Snipes, Sandpipers, Etc - Famaily Scolopacidae. American Woodcock
228. Philohela minor. 11 in. Bill very long; eyes very large and located near the top of the head; form heavy; legs short; plumage much mottled with black, brown and gray. These peculiar birds are ...
-Wilson Snipe
230. Gallinago delicata. 11 in. Bill very long, but not as heavy as that of the Wood-eoek; eyes not abnormally large; head striped with black and whitish; back handsomely variegated with black, ...
-Dowitcher
23?.. Macrorhamphus griseus. 10.5 in. Bill very long like that of the Snipe. Adults in summer are reddish-brown below, more or less specked with black on the breast and barred with black on the sid...
-Long-Billed Dowitcher
232. Long-Billed Dowitcher(M. scolopaceus), is found in western N. A. The bill is supposed to be longer, but the plumage is identical and the birds prob-ably are. ...
-Stilt Sandpiper
233. Micropalama himantopus. 8.5 in. Bill slender and only moderately long. In summer, the entire underparts are rusty-white, barred with blackish; ear-coverts and top of head browner; back mixed ...
-Knot
234. Tringa canutus. 10.5 in. Bill moderately long and quite stout; form more robust than most of our shore birds. Adults in summer, mixed brownish and gray, above, and uniform reddish-brown below....
-Purple Sandpiper
235. Arquatella maritima. 9 in. Upper parts blackish, margined with buffy; breast and sides slaty purple. In winter, blackish, without the rusty edging to the feathers. These dark colored little ...
-Pectoral Sandpiper
239. Pisobia maculata. 9 in. Crown and back blackish, strongly edged with reddish-brown; an ashy-gray wash on the breast, with numerous streaks of blackish. Well known and called by a great ...
-White-Rumped Sandpiper
240. Pisobia fuscicollis. 7.5 in. Upper tail coverts white; below white, but with the throat and breast streaked with dusky, these markings extending on the sides to the tail. Notes. - Musical ...
-Baird Sandpiper
241. Pisobia bairdi. 7.5 in. Of the same size, form and general coloration as the White-rumped Sandpiper, but the upper tail-coverts are blackish, and the breast is only very faintly streaked. ...
-Least Sandpiper
242. Pisobia minutilla. 6 in. Smallest of our sandpipers. Upperparts blackish, edged with bright chestnut; breast and sides ashy-gray, conspicuously streaked with dusky. Notes. - A musical ...
-Semipalmated Sandpiper
246. Ereunetes pusillus. 6.25 in. Feet with small webs between the toes at their base. Similar in size and form to the Least Sandpiper, but the upper parts are not as bright rusty, and the breast ...
-Red-Backed Sandpiper
243. Pelidna alpina sakhalina. 8 in. Bill slightly decurved and rather stout. Adults in summer, with the upper parts largely bright rusty; belly black; head, throat, breast and sides strongly ...
-Sanderling
248. Calidris leucophcea. 8 in. Toes short and stout; no hind toe. Adults in summer, variegated above with bright reddish-brown and black; below white, the breast being strongly washed with rusty ...
-Marbled Godwit
249. Limosa fedoa. 19 in. Bill long and slightly recurved. Back, wings and tail, rufous, barred with black; rump usually white, with black bars; underparts pale rufous with narrow bars; head ...
-Hudsonian Godwit
251. Limosa hoemastica. 15 in. Bill slightly recurved; tail black at the end, and white at the base, not barred as that of the last species always is. Above blackish, with rusty margins; below ...
-Greater Yellow-Legs
254. Totanus melanoleucus. 14 in. Bill long and rather slender; legs long and yellow or greenish yellow. Head and neck streaked with gray and white; back black margined with white; rump white; ...
-Lesser Yellow-Legs
255. Totanus flavipes. 10.5 in. Very similar in form, color and markings to the large Yellow-legs, but smaller in every way. Range. - Breeds in the interior of Canada, north to the Arctic Ocean,...
-Solitary Sandpiper
256. Helodromas solitarius. 8.5 in. Above olive-grayish, streaked on the head and neck, and sharply speckled on the back and wings, with white; tail sharply barred with black and white; below ...
-Willet
258. Catophophorus semipalmatus. 16 in. Bill long and quite stout; feet with small webs between the bases of the toes. Upper parts brownish-gray, more or less speckled with black; most of ...
-Bartramian Sandpiper
261. Bartramia longicauda. 12 in. Upper parts blackish with greenish-brown edgings; tail brownish with black bars, and white tips to the outer feathers. Underparts white, with prominent inverted, ...
-Buff-Breasted Sandpiper
262. Tryngites subruficollis. 8 in. Bill short and slender. General color above, blackish-brown margined with tawny; underparts buffy, with a few black specks on the sides of the breast. Primaries ...
-Spotted Sandpiper
263. Actitis macularia. 7.5 in. Below white, with round blackish spots, heaviest on the breast and sides; above olive-brown or gray, with faint black bars; a narrow black line from the bill ...
-Long-Billed Curlew
264. Numenius americanus. 23 in. Bill much decurved and very long (4 to 8 in.), the longest of any of our shore birds. Plumage variegated with rufous and blackish above; bright buffy or rufous ...
-Hudsonian Curlew
265. Numenius hudsonicus. 17 in. Darker brown above, than the Sickle-bill; crown broadly striped with blackish and buff; underparts grayish, streaked on the breast and barred on the sides with ...
-Eskimo Curlew
266. Numenius borealis. 13.5 in. Bill comparatively short (about 2 in.) and little curved. Above, marked similarly to the last; below white or pale buff, often thickly covered on the breast and ...
-Plovers - Famaily Charadriidae. Black-Bellied Plover
270. Squatarola squatarola. 11.5 in. Hind toe very small. Bill short and stout. Adults in summer with the hack, wings and tail barred or marked with black and white; top of head and nape white, ...
-American Golden Plover
272. Charadrius dominicus. 10.5 in. No hind toe. Back and tail mottled with black and yellow; below, more or less entirely black to the tail. Young and winter adults, more or less spotted with ...
-Killdeer
273. Oxyechus vociferus. 10 in. No hind toe. Rump ana base of tail reddish-brown; breast crossed by two black bands. Like the Spotted Sandpiper, this bird is locally and abundantly distributed ...
-Semipalmated Plover
274. Aegialitis semipalmata. 7 in. Small web between the bases of the two outer toes. Single broad, black band across the breast; black line from base of bill to eye. They are very abundant on our ...
-Piping Plover
277. Aegialitis meloda. 7 in. Very pale above; no black in front of eye; black patch on each side of breast. Young similar, but the black replaced by grayish, as is the case with the last species. ...
-Snowy Plover
278. Aegialitis nivosa. 6.5 in. Very small and very pale colored. Small black patch on either side of the breast, on ear coverts, and on crown. Bill more slender but longer than that of the Piping ...
-Wilson Plover
280. Ochthodromus wilsonius. 7.5 in. Bill large and heavy for birds of this genus. A black band across the neck, not extending to the back of the neck; dark line between eye and bill. Notes. - ...
-Mountain Plover
281. Podasocys montanus. 9 in. No black on breast or sides, but with black band on top of head and a black line from bill to eye. Above grayish-brown; below buffy across the breast, white ...
-Turnstone
283. Arenaria interpres. 9.75 in. Very similar to the next, which is the one figured, but slightly larger, and with black prevailing in the upperparts. This is the Old World species, found in ...
-Ruddy Turnstone
283.1. Arenaria interpres morinella. 9.5 in. Bill short and stout, the upper mandible being straight, so that the bill has an upturned appearance. Legs reddish on adult birds and orange on young. ...
-American Oyster-Catcher
286. Hoematopus palliatus. 19 in. Bill very long, heavy, compressed, and thin and chisellike at the tip. Bill and eye, red; legs flesh color. These large, awkward looking birds are not scarce on ...
-Mexican Jacana
Jacana spinosa. 8 in. A very peculiar species. Bill plover-like; at the base, terminating in a leaf-like sheaf that covers the forehead; a hard spur on the shoulder of each wing; legs and toes extr...
-Grouse, Partridges, Etc - Order Gallinae. Family Odontophoridae. Bob-White; Quail; Virginia Partridge
289. Colinus virginianus. 10 in. Male with white throat, bordered with black; female with a yellowish-brown throat, and line above eye. One of the most popular game birds, so popular that it is ...
-Scaled Partridge
Callipepla squamata. 10 in. With a whitish or buffy-white crest; plumage bluish -gray, with darker edges giving the bird the appearance of being covered with scales. The female is more brownish, bu...
-Gambel Partridge
295. Lophortyx gambelii. 10 in. Head with an elegant recurved crest of six or seven feathers; normally these are carried in one packet so that there appears to be but one feather, but when excited,...
-Mearns Or Massena Partridge
296. Cyrtonyx montezumae mcarnsi. 9 in. Bill very stout and compressed. Crest large, puffy and flat. Markings on the male very grotesque and clownish; general color of the female, pinkish brown ...
-Dusky Grouse
297. Dendragapus obscurus. 20 in. Plumage gray, white and black, with a few rusty markings on the back; wide gray band on tip of tail. Female smaller, browner and more barred above. These large ...
-Hudsonian Spruce Grouse
298. Canachites canadensis. 15 in. Very similar to the next, which is our common species, but the female is not quite as rusty. Found in Labrador and about Hudson Bay. ...
-Canada Grouse; Spruce Grouse
298c. C. c. canace. 15 in. Male black and grayish; female chiefly rusty, barred with black. The Spruce Grouse is usually found in dense thickets and groves or swamps of evergreen woods. It is one ...
-Ruffed Grouse
300. Bonassa umbellus. 17 in. Crested and with two large, black, neck-ruffs; plumage brown, black and white. Female with the ruffs smaller and usually brownish. These grouse have two color phases, ...
-Willow Ptarmigan
301. Lagopus lagopus. 15 in. In winter, white with black tail feathers. In summer, usually reddish-brown with black bars. This species has a much stouter bill than the next. Nest. - Eggs laid ...
-Rock Ptarmigan
302. Lagopus rupestris. 14 in. In winter, like the last species, except that the bill is smaller, and the lores are black. Range. - From the Gulf of St. Lawrence and northern British Columbia ...
-Prairie Hen; Pinnated Grouse
305. Tympanuchus americanus. 18 in. Tufts of neck feathers rounded or square at the ends, long on the males, and short on the females. Above, barred with brownish-black and white or burly white, ...
-Heath Hen
306. Tympanuchus cupido. 17 in. Neck feathers pointed; scapulars more broadly tipped with white; axillars always barred; top of head paler and always brownish. These differences will always ...
-Lesser Prairie Hen
307. Tympanuchus pallidicinctus. 16 in. Nearest like the prairie hen but paler above, the brown bars being narrower and lighter colored, but with the edges blackish, giving the back of the bird a ...
-Prairie Sharp-Tailed Grouse
308b. Pedicecetes phasianellus campestris. 18 in. No pinnatea or ruffs on the neck, but the head is crested a little more than that of the Prairie Hen; tail with the central feathers nearly two ...
-Sage Grouse
309. Centrocercus urophasittiuis. 29 in. The female of this large and very interesting grouse, differs from the male only in its smaller size and paler, duller plumage. They are found in abundance ...
-Family Meleagridae. Wild Turkey
310. Meleagres gallopavo silvestris. 48 in. Female much smaller and duller colored than the male. These fine, large birds frequent woodlands and borders of streams, where they search through the ...
-Ring-Necked Or Mongolian Pheasant
Phasianus torquatus The male of this beautiful pheasant varies greatly in length according to the development of the tail, sometimes being 36 in. in length; the female averages about 22 in. and is ...
-Family Cracidae. Chachalaca
311. Ortalis vetula mccalli. 21 in. Plumage olive-brown above, and gray below; head crested; sides of bead and chin, naked, orange-red. These birds are found in southern Texas, in dense woods, ...
-Pigeons And Doves - Order Columbae. Family Columbidae. Passenger Pigeon
315. Eetopistes migratorius. 16 in. Head and back bluish-slate; below, rich rusty brown. Only a few years ago, up to 1880, they were extremely abundant in eastern North America. Seemingly ...
-Mourning Dove
316. Zenaidura macroura carolinensis. 12 in. Upperparts olive-brown; below, buffy-gray; a small black mark on the ears above the iridescent neck patch. These birds never flock as Passenger ...
-White-Fronted Dove
318. Leptotila fulcivcntris brachyptcra. 12 in. No black ear-mark; under wing coverts rusty chestnut. Forehead whitish; all but central pair of tail feathers tipped with white. Nest. - ...
-White-Winged Dove
319. Melopelia asiatiea. 12 in. Large black patch on the ears; tail only moderately long, and broadly rounded, with large white ends to the outer feathers. Besides the regular cooing notes, common ...
-Ground Dove
320. Choemepelia passerina terrestris. 6.75 in. Size very small; tail short and nearly square. Back of head blue-gray; forehead and most of underparts pinkish. Bill, feet and eye, more or less red....
-Inca Dove
312. Scardafella inca. 8 in. Tail long, with the outer feathers tipped with white, and shorter than the middle ones. Feathers mostly margined with brownish-black. The bases of the primaries are ...
-Vultures, Hawks And Owls - Order Raptores. American Vultures - Famaily Cathartidae. Turkey Vulture Or Buzzard
325. Cathartes aura septentrionalis. 30 in. Head naked; red or carmine; bill dull whitish; eyes brown; feet pinkish. Plumage blackish-brown. Nest. - Their two eggs are laid upon the ground, ...
-Black Vulture
326. Catharista urubu. 24 in. Entire plumage, including the naked head, black; feet and tip of bill yellowish. Under surface of the wings white, making it very easy to identify. Nest. - Two ...
-Falcons, Hawks And Eagles - Famaily Falconidae. Swallow-Tailed Kite
327. Elanoides forficatus. 24 in. Tail long and deeply forked; plumage white, and glossy black; feet short but stout; bill black, with cere and feet bluish-gray. The flight of these birds is very ...
-White-Tailed Kite
328. Elanus leucurus. 16 in. Head, underparts and tail, white; shoulders black; upperparts gray. Young, with the back tinged with rusty. Their food consists largely of snakes, but they also eat a ...
-Mississippi Kite
329. Ictinia mississippiensis. 14 in. Head, underparts and ends of secondaries, bluish-gray. Lores and tail black; back dark; eyes red. Nest. - Of sticks and weeds in the tops of tall trees; ...
-Everglade Kite
330. Rostrhamus sociabilis. 15 in. Bill very slender and much hooked, the lower mandible being decurved somewhat, to match the upper; the cutting edge of the bill without a tooth or notch, as most ...
-Marsh Hawk
331. Circus hudsonius. 19 in. Upper tail coverts and base of tail white. Male, blue-gray above; below whitish, streaked and barred with rusty. Female and young. - Above rusty brownish-black; below ...
-Sharp-Shinned Hawk
332. Accipiter velox. 12 in. This little hawk, so near like the Cooper, is one of the most active of the family, and from this fact it gets its name velox, meaning swift. It is often seen in woods,...
-Cooper Hawk
333. Accipiter cooperi. 16 in. This hawk is a large edition of the last species. All hawks vary in size, this one and the last, perhaps, more than any others. Female hawks are always the largest. ...
-American Goshawk
334. Astur atricapillus. 23 in. Adults, above bluish-slate, darkest on the crown; a whitish line over the eye; below white, finely waved with gray. Young, brownish-black, with lighter edgings to ...
-Harris Hawk
335. Parabuteo unicinctus Jiarrisi. 20 in. Tail coverts, base and tip of tail, white. Adults with the shoulders, thighs and under wing-coverts, reddish-brown. Young with rusty edgings to feathers ...
-Red-Tailed Hawk
337. Buteo borealis. 21 in. One of the handsomest and most powerfully built of our hawks. Adults with the tail rusty-red, with or without a narrow blackish band near the tip; below white, with a ...
-Red-Shouldered Hawk
339. Buteo lineatus. 19 in. Adults with the shoulders bright reddish-brown; primaries and secondaries barred with black and white; below buffy thickly barred with rusty-brown. Young with the ...
-Sennett White-Tailed Hawk
341. Buteo albicaudatus sennetti. 22 in. Adults grayish-slate above and to the sides of the throat; tail and underparts white, the former with a subterminal band of black and indistinct wavy lines ...
-Swainson Hawk
342. Buteo swainsoni. 20 in. This species has the greatest variety of plumages of any of our hawks. It has only three outer primaries notched near the tips, while the two last species, which are ...
-Broad-Winged Hawk
343. Buteo platypterus. 16 in. Adults grayish-brown above; below, streaked on the throat and breast, and barred below, with rusty-brown; tail with three blackish bars. Young similar above; below ...
-American Rough-Legged Hawk
347a. Archibuico lagopus sancti-johannis. 22 in. Legs feathered to the toes. Adults blackish on the back and belly; head and breast, more or less grayish-white, streaked with dusky; tail white, ...
-Ferruginous Rough-Legged Hawk
348. Archibutco ferrugmeus. 23 in. Legs feathered to the toes. Adults with back, shoulders, thighs and legs, rusty, barred or streaked with black; tail grayish-white, tinged with rusty. Young ...
-Golden Eagle
349. Aquila chrysoetos. 35 in. Legs feathered to the toes. Plumage blackish-brown, adults having the lengthened feathers on the nape, golden-brown, and the tail more or less mixed with white: leg ...
-Bald Eagle
352. Halioeetus leucocephalus. 34 in. Legs not feathered to the toes. Adults with white head and tail. Young birds similar in color to those of the Golden Eagle, but blacker and with the legs ...
-White Gryfalcon
353. Falco island us. 23 in. Adults in perfect plumage, pure white, slightly barred on the back and spotted below with black. Nest. - Of sticks, lined with grasses and feathers; placed on ...
-Gray Gyrfalcon
354. Falco rusticolus. 23 in. Adults white, heavily barred above, and streaked below with gray and black. Range. - Arctic regions, south in winter, rarely to northern United States. 354a. ...
-Prairie Falcon
355. Falco mexicanus. 18 in. A blackish patch on the sides of the throat, similar to that of the Duck Hawk. Above brownish black, much paler and never with the slaty color of the Duck Hawk; below ...
-Duck Hawk
356a. Falco peregrinus anatum. 17 in. Black moustache mark, or patch on each side of the throat. Adults white below, tinged with buffy on the breast and sides, and lightly barred with black; above ...
-Pigeon Hawk
357. Falco columbarius. 12 in. Adult male, bluish slate above, with black shaft lines to the feathers; below buffy on the breast, sides and thighs; streaked on the breast and barred on the flanks ...
-Richardson Merlin
357b. Falco columbarius richardsonii. 12 in. Both adults and young are similar to the same of the last species, but they are much paler colored, and the tail is crossed by six light bars. The ...
-Sparrow Hawk
360. Falco sparverius. 10.5 in. This is the smallest and one of the handsomest of our hawks. Cannot be mistaken for any other species, because of its bright colors and odd marking. The female is ...
-Audubon Caracara
362. Polyborus cheriway. 22 in. These peculiar birds cannot be mistaken for any of our hawks or falcons. They are very sluggish birds, with habits resembling both those of buzzards and some of the ...
-American Osprey; Fish Hawk
364. Pandion haliaetus carolinensis. 23 in. Real old birds have the head whiter, and less white edging to the back feathers, than do the young. Feet very strong, and very hard and rough, perfectly ...
-Family Aluconidae. Barn Owl
365. Aluco pratincola. 18 in. Plumage very soft, finely barred and specked; general coloration gray, yellowijh-brown and white. No ear tufts; eyes small and brown; face very long; legs very long. ...
-Horned Owls - Famaily Bubonidae. American Long-Eared Owl
360. Asio ivilsonianus. 15 in. This species can readily be distinguished from the next, which is the only one of the same size, by its long ear tufts; it is also darker, and the markings on the ...
-Short-Eared Owl
367. Asio flammeus. 15.5 in. Ear tufts very short; general color buffy, not nearly as brown nor as dark as the last species usually is. They are not nearly as nocturnal as most of the owls, and ...
-Barred Owl
368. Striae varia. 20 in. Eyes dark brown. This is the most abundant of the large owls throughout its range. It has no ears. This species is the common hoot owl, that is the terror of small ...
-Great Gray Owl
370. Scotiaptex nebulosa. 27 in. Tail long; eyes small and yellow. This large owl is only found in Northern United States during the winter. Its tail is unusually long, as are all its feathers, ...
-Richardson Owl
371. Cryptoglauw funerea richardsoni. 10 in. This species bears considerable resemblance to the little Acadian Owls, but is grayer; the top of the head has numerous round white spots and the wing ...
-Saw-Whet Owl; Acadian Owl
372. Cryptoglaux acadica. 8 in. Smallest of our eastern Owls; no ear tufts. General color brownish above and white below with the sides streaked with brown. No markings on wing coverts, but ...
-Screech Owl
373. Otus asio. 9.5 in. Two color phases independent of age, sex or season; eyes yellow; has ear tufts. The Screech Owl, or its sub-species, is found throughout the United States, and is one of ...
-Great Horned Owl
375. Bubo virginianus. 23 in. Has ear tufts, thus distinguishing it from any other of our large, powerfully built owls. These large birds are the fiercest, most active and most destructive of the ...
-Snowy Owl
37C. Nyctea nyctea. 25 in. No ear tufts. Plumage white, more or less heavily spotted with black, the female usually being quite strongly barred on the back. They are locally abundant in the far nor...
-American Hawk Owl
377a. Surnia ulula caparoch. 15 in. Tail long and rounded; plumage mottled black, white and gray, with little, if any, brownish tinge; heavily barred with black. These owls, curiously resembling a ...
-Burrowing Owl
378. Speotyto cunicularia hypogcea. 10 in. Legs very long, and nearly bare on the lower part of tarsi; tail short; no ear tufts. An abundant and useful species in the prairie regions west of the ...
-Bird Guide. Part II. Preface
The native birds are one of our nation's most valuable assets. Destroy them, and in a comparatively few years the insects will have multiplied to such an extent that trees will be denuded of their fol...
-Bird Guide. Part II. Introduction
It is an undisputed fact that a great many of our birds are becoming more scarce each year, while a few are, even now, on the verge of extinction. The decrease in numbers of a few species may be attri...
-How To Study Birds
This refers, not to the scientific, but to the popular study of our birds, chiefly in the field. We can learn many very interesting things by watching our birds, especially during the nesting season, ...
-Part II. Land Birds East Of The Rockies
The numbers and names used in this book are those adopted by the American Ornithologists' Union, and are known both in this country and abroad. The lengths given are averages; our small birds often va...
-Carolina Paroquet
382. Conuropsis carolinensis. 12 1/2 inches. Adults have the fore part of the head orange, while young birds have the head entirely green, with only a trifle orange on the forehead. With the ...
-Groove-Billed Ani
384. Crotophaga sulcirostris. 14 1/2 inches. Anis are fairly abundant in southern Texas along the Rio Grande. Like all the members of the family of Cuckoos, their nesting habits are very irregular;...
-Road-Runner
385. Geococcyx californianus. 23 inches. In the southwestern portions of our country, from Texas and Kansas west to the Pacific, these curious birds are commonly found. They are locally known as ...
-Mangrove Cuckoo
386. Coccyzuo minor. 13 inches. These buff-breasted Cuckoos are natives of Cuba and Central America, being found in southern Florida only during the summer. The habits of all the American Cuckoos ...
-Yellow-Billed Cuckoo
387. Coccyzus americanus. 12 1/4 inches. This species is the most abundant in the southern part of its range, while the Black-bill is the most common in the North. Notice that the lower mandible ...
-Black-Billed Cuckoo
388. Coccyzus erythropthalmus. 11 3/4 inches. Cuckoos are of quiet and retiring habits, but on account of their mournful notes are often regarded with awe by the superstitious. They are one of our ...
-Belted Kingfisher
390. Ceryle alcyon. 13 inches. The male has the breast band and sides blue gray, like the back, while the female has chestnut colored sides and breast band in addition to a gray band. ...
-Texas Kingfisher
391. Ceryle americana septentrionalis. 8 inches. The adult male of this species has a rufous breast band, while the female has only a greenish one. The Texan Green Kingfisher is the smallest ...
-Ivory-Billed Woodpecker
392. Campephilus principalis. 20 inches. Male with a scarlet crest, female with a black one. These are the largest and most rare of the Woodpeckers found within our borders. Their decline in ...
-Hairy Woodpecker
393. Dryobates villosus. 9 inches. In summer these Woodpeckers are found in heavy woods, where they breed, hut in winter they are often seen on trees about houses, even in the larger cities. ...
-Southern Downy Woodpecker
31)4. Dryobates pubescens. 6 inches. The male has a red nuchal patch while the female has none. Downies are one of the commonest of our Woodpeckers and are usually tame, allowing a very close approach...
-Red-Cockaded Woodpecker
395. Dryobatcs borealis. 8 1/4 inches. Male with a small patch of scarlet on both sides of the head; female without. The actions and habits are very similar to those of the Downy. The birds can ...
-Texan Woodpecker
396. Dryobatcs scalaris bairdi. 7 1/4 inches. On account of its numerous cross bars, this species is often known as the Ladder-backed Woodpecker. They are quite similar to the Nuttall Woodpecker, ...
-Arctic Three-Toed Woodpecker
400. Picoides arcticus. 9.5 inches. Back glossy black, without any white. Only three toes, two in front and one behind. This is the most common of the two species found within the United States. ...
-American Three-Toed Woodpecker
401. Picoides americanus. 8 3/4 inches. Back barred with white; outer tail feathers barred with black; yellow crown patch on male mixed with white. Except on some of the higher mountain ranges ...
-Yellow-Bellied Sapsucker
402. Sphyrapicus varius. 8 1/2 inches. Male with a scarlet crown and throat; female with a scarlet crown and white throat; young with the head and neck mottled gray and white, with a few scarlet ...
-Pileated Woodpecker
405. Phloeotomus pileatus. 17 inches. Male with a scarlet crown and crest, and a red moustache or mark extending back from the bill; female with scarlet crest but a blackish forehead and no ...
-Red-Headed Woodpecker
406. Melanerpes crythrocephalus. 9 3/4 inches. Adults with entire head and breast red; young with a gray head and back, streaked with darker. This very handsome species is common and very well ...
-Red-Bellied Woodpecker
409. Centurus carolinus. 9 1/2 inches. Male with whole top of head and back of neck red; female with forehead and hind head red but crown gray. Both sexes have the center of the belly reddish, and ...
-Flicker
412. Colaptes auratus. 13 inches. Male with a black moustache mark; female without, although young females in the first plumage show some black. These birds are very often known as Golden-...
-Red-Shafted Flicker
413. Colaptes cafer collaris. 13 inches. Crown brown and throat gray, these colors being just reversed from those of the common Flicker. The male is distinguished by a red moustache mark, which ...
-Chuck-Will's-Widow
416. Antrostomns carolinensis. 12 inches. Male with the end half of the outer tail feathers white, and the edge of the outer vanes rusty; female with no white ends to the feathers. Birds of this ...
-Whip-Poor-Will
417. Antrostomus vociferus. 9 3/4 inches. Male with broad white tips to outer tail feathers; female with narrow buffy tips. These birds are often confounded with the Nighthawk, but are very easily ...
-Poor-Will
418. Phalaenoptilus nuttallii. 7 1/2 inches. The female of this beautiful little Night-jar differs from the male only in having narrow buffy tips to the outer tail feathers instead of broad white ...
-Merrill Paraque
419. Nyctidromus albicollis merrilli. 13 inches. As usual with birds of this family, sexual difference in the plumage occurs chiefly on the tips of the outer tail feathers. These birds are common in ...
-Nighthawk
420. Chordeiles virginianus. 10 inches. Male with white throat and white band across tail; female with rusty throat and no white on tail. Notice that the Nighthawk has a forked tail and white band ...
-Texan Nighthawk
421. Chordeiles acutipennis texensis. This species is found in southern Texas and New Mexico. It differs from the last in having the primaries spotted with rusty, like those of the whip-poor-will. ...
-Chimney Swift
423. Chaetura pelagica. 5 1/2 inches. Unused chimneys of old dwellings make favorite roosting and nesting places for these smoke-colored birds. They originally dwelt in hollow trees until the ...
-White-Throated Swift
425. Aeronautes melanoleucus. 6 1/2 inches. This beautiful swift is one of the most graceful of winged creatures. Its flight is extremely rapid and its evolutions remarkable. They nest in ...
-Ruby-Throated Hummingbird
428. Trochilus colubris. 3 1/2 inches. This little gem is the only one of the family found within the territory included in this book. Owners of flower gardens have the best of opportunities to ...
-Scissor-Tailed Flycatcher
443. Muscivora forficata. 14 1/2 inches. This pretty creature is the most graceful in appearance of the Flycatcher family, if not of the whole order of perching birds. In the southwest it is ...
-Kingbird
444. Tyrannus lyraiuius. 8 1/2 inches. Adults with a concealed orange crown patch; young with none. From the time of their arrival in May until they leave us in August, Kingbirds are much in ...
-Gray Kingbird
445. Tyrannus dominiscensis. 9 inches. Differs from the common Kingbird in being larger and gray above; has black ear coverts, and no white tip to tail. Like the last species, these are very ...
-Arkansas Kingbird
447. Tyrannus verticalis. 9 inches. These tyrant flycatchers are abundant west of the Mississippi, where they are often, and perhaps more aptly, known as the Western Kingbirds. If possible, they ...
-Derby Flycatcher
449. Pitangus derbianus. 10 1/2 inches. This imposing flycatcher is the largest of the family that is found in North America. As usual with members of the family it is of a quarrelsome disposition,...
-Crested Flycatcher
452. Myiarchus crinitus. 9 inches. These large flycatchers are very noisy in the mating season, but their notes are rather more musical than those of the Kingbirds. They appear to be of a ...
-Phoebe
456. Sayornis phoebe. 7 inches. A Phoebe is always associated, in my mind, with old bridges and bubbling brooks. Nearly every bridge which is at all adapted for the purpose has its Phoebe home ...
-Olive-Sided Flycatcher
459. Nuttalornis borealis. 7 1/2 inches. These birds can scarcely be called common anywhere, but single pairs of them may be found, in their breeding range, in suitable pieces of woodland. I have ...
-Wood Pewee
461. Myiochanes virens. 6 1/2 inches. In life, the Pewee can best be distinguished from the larger Phoebe, with which it is often confounded, by its sad, plaintive pe-ah-wee, pee-wee, which is ...
-Yellow-Bellied Flycatcher
463. Empidonax flaviventris. 5 1/2 inches. These strange little Flycatchers are found in swamps such as those usually frequented by Olive-sided Flycatchers and Parula Warblers. They are one of the ...
-Green-Crested Or Acadian Flycatcher
465. Empidonax virescens. 5 1/2 inches. This bird is very similar to the last, but the lower mandible is light, and the throat and belly white. Their favorite resorts are shady woods not far from ...
-Alder Flycatcher
466a. Empidonas traitti alnorum. 6 inches. This species is very similar to, but larger, than the well-known Least Flycatcher or Chebec. They are found in swampy pastures or around the edges of ...
-Least Flycatcher
467. Empidonax minimus. 5 1/2 inches. Smaller than the last and with the tail slightly forked. Common everywhere in orchards, swamps or along roadsides. They are very often known by the name of ...
-Vermilion Flycatcher
471. Pyrocephalus rubineus mexicanus. 6 inches. Female with only a slight tinge of pink, where the male is brilliant vermilion. This is the most gorgeously plumaged species of the American ...
-Horned Lark
474. Otocoris alpestris. 7 3/4 inches. This variety, which is larger than its sub-species, is only found in the U. S. in winter, but several of the sub-species are residents in our limits. During ...
-American Magpie
475. Pica pica hudsonia. 20 inches. This handsome member of the Crow family is sure to attract the attention of all who may see him. He is very pert in all his actions, both in trees and on the ...
-Blue Jay
477. Cyanocitta cristata. 11 1/2 inches. These are one of the best known and most beautiful birds that we have, but, unfortunately, they have a very bad reputation. They often rob other birds of ...
-Florida Jay
479. Aphelocoma cyanca. 11 1/2 inches. This Jay is locally distributed chiefly in the southern parts of Florida, being found principally in scrub oaks. Like the Blue Jav, their food consists of ...
-Green Jay
483. Xanthoura luxuosa glauescens. 12 inches. These Jays are very beautiful, and we are sorry to have to admit that, like all the other members of the family, they are merciless in their treatment ...
-Canada Jay
484. Perisoreus canadensis. 11 1/2 inches. These birds are well known to hunters, trappers and campers in the northern woods. They arc great friends, especially of the lumbermen, as some of the ...
-Crows
Northern Raven 486a. Corvus corax principalis. 25 inches. The habits of all the ravens and crows are identical and are too well known to need mention. They are all very destructive to young birds a...
-Clarke Nutcracker
491. Nucifraga columbiana. 12 1/2 inches. Clarke Crows are found abundantly in all coniferous forests on the higher mountains in their range. They are very peculiar birds, having some of the ...
-Starling
493. Sturnus vulgaris. 8 1/2 inches. Plumage metallic green and purple, heavily spotted above and below with buffy or white. These European birds were introduced into New York a number of years ...
-Bobolink
494. Dolichonyx oryzivorus. 7 1/4 inches. Bobolinks are to be found in rich grass meadows, from whence their sweet, wild music is often borne to us by the breeze. While his mate is feeding in the ...
-Cowbird
495. Molothrus ater. 7 3/4 inches. Male glossy greenish black, with a brown head; female and young, dull gray. Groups of these birds are often seen walking sedately about among the cows in the ...
-Yellow-Headed Blackbird
497. Xanthocephalus xanthoccphalus. 10 inches. Male black, with head and breast bright yellow; female more brownish and with head paler and mixed with brown. These handsome birds are common ...
-Red-Winged Blackbird
498. Agelaius phceniceus. 9 1/2 inches. Male black, with scarlet and buff shoulders; female brownish black above and streaked below. Nearly all our ponds or wet meadows have their pair or colony ...
-Meadowlark
501. Sturnella magna. 10% inches. Meadowlarks are familiar friends of the hillside and meadow; their clear fife-like whistle is often heard, while they are perched on a fence-post or tree-top, as ...
-Audubon Oriole
503. Icterus audubonii. 9 1/2 inches. Within the United States, these large Orioles are found only in southern Texas. They are not uncommon there and are resident. Their notes are loud, mellow ...
-Scott Oriole
504. Icterus parisorum. 8 inches. These beautiful birds are found in southwestern United States, from California to western Texas. They are said to sing more freely than other members of the ...
-Hooded Oriole
505. Icterus cucullatus sennetti. 8 inches. This very brilliantly plumaged Oriole is, perhaps, the most abundant of the family in southern Texas. It is not as shy a bird as the two preceding ...
-Orchard Oriole
506. Icterus spurius. 7 1/4 inches. Male chestnut and black; female dull yellowish and gray; young male, second year, like female, but with black face and throat. These Orioles are usually found ...
-Baltimore Oriole
507. Icterus galbula. 7 1/2 inches. Male orange and black; female dull yellowish and gray. They are sociable birds and seem to like the company of mankind, for their nests are, from choice, ...
-Rusty Blackbird
510. Scolecophagus caroliniis. 9 1/2 inches. Male glossy black; female grayish; both sexes in winter with most of the head and breast feathers tipped with rusty. In the United States we know these ...
-Brewer Blackbird
510. Scolecophagus cyaneocephalas. 10 inches. Male with a glossy purplish head and greenish-black body; female grayish brown. This is the Western representative of the preceding; it is most ...
-Purple Grackle
511. Quiscalus quiscula. 12 inches. Male with purple head and greenish back; female brownish gray. All the Grackles are very similar in appearance, the colors varying with different individuals of ...
-Boat-Tailed Grackle
513. Megaquiscalus major. 15 inches. Similar in color to the last but much larger, and having the same habits. Eggs also larger (1.25 x .95). Southeastern U. S. The Great-tailed Grackle (ma-...
-Evening Grosbeak
514. Hesperiphona vespertina. 8 inches. Female marked like the male but much paler colored. As would be judged from the large bills that these birds have, their food consists almost entirely of ...
-Pine Grosbeak
515. Pinicola enuclcator leucura. 8 1/2 inches. Male rosy red: female gray and yellowish. These pretty birds visit us every winter, coming from Canada and northern New England, where they are ...
-Purple Finch
517. Carpodacus purpureits. 6 1/4 inches. Male dull rosy red; female streaked brownish gray. These beautiful songsters are common in the northern tier of states and in Canada. In spring the ...
-American Crossbill
521. Loxia curvirostra minor. 6 inches. These curious creatures appear in flocks on the outskirts of our cities every winter, where they will be found almost exclusively in coniferous trees. They ...
-White-Winged Crossbill
522. Loxia leucoptera. 6 inches. Male, rosy; female, with yellowish. This species seems to be of a more roving disposition, and even more eccentric than the last. They are not nearly as common ...
-Gray-Crowned Leucosticte
524. Leucosticte tephrocotis. 6 1/2 inches. Female similar to, but duller colored than the male. All the members of this genus are western and northern, this one only being found east of the ...
-Redpoll
528. Acaittltis linaria. 5 1/4 inches. Male with a rosy breast; female without. In winter these northern birds may be found in flocks gathering seeds from weeds by the roadside and stone walls. Their ...
-Greenland Redpoll
527. Acanthis hornemannii. 6 inches. A larger and much whiter species found in Greenland and migrating to Labrador in winter. 527b. Hoary Redpoll (exilipes), smaller and darker, but still lighter ...
-American Goldfinch
529. Astragaiinus tristis. 5 1/4 inches. These beautiful little creatures are often known as Thistle-birds and Wild Canaries, the former name because they are often seen on thistles, from the down ...
-Western Goldfinch
530. Astragalinus psaltria. 4 1/4 inches. Cap. wings and tail black; sides of head and back greenish. Female much duller and with no black in the crown. These little Goldfinches are very abundant ...
-Pine Finch Or Siskin
533. Spinus pinus. 5 inches. These are also northern birds, being found in the U. S., with the exception of the extreme northern parts, only in winter and early spring. Their habits are just like ...
-Snowflake
534. Plectrophenax nivalis. 7 inches. Adults in summer black and white; in winter, washed with brownish. When winter storms sweep across our land, these birds blow in like true snowflakes, ...
-Lapland Longspur
536. Calcarius lapponicus. 6 1/4 inches. Male in summer with black crown and throat, and chestnut nape; female similar but duller; winter plumage, with feathers of head and neck tipped with ...
-Smith Longspur
537. Calcarius pictus. 6 1/2 inches. Male in summer with the underparts buffy and sides of head marked with black; female, and male in winter, much duller with all bright markings covered with a ...
-Chestnut-Collared Longspur
538. Calcarius ornatus. 6 1/4 inches. Male in summer with a black breast and crown, and chestnut nape; female, and male in winter, much duller and with all bright markings covered with grayish. ...
-M'Cown Longspur
539. Rhynchophanes mccoicnii. 6 inches. Male with a black crown and patch on breast, and chestnut shoulders; female, and male in winter, dull colored with all bright markings obscured by brownish ...
-English Sparrow
Passer domesticus. 6 1/4 inches. These street urchins were introduced into our country from Europe about 1850, and have since multiplied and spread out so that they now are found in all parts of ou...
-Vesper Sparrow
540. Proecetes gramineus. 6 inches. The chestnut shoulders and white outer tail feathers distinguish this from any other of our Sparrows. The name Vesper Sparrow is given this bird because of ...
-Ipswich Sparrow
541. Passcrculus princeps. 6 1/4 inches. This species is larger and paler colored, but very similar to the more common and better known Savanna Sparrow. Its habits are the same. It breeds on Sable ...
-Savanna Sparrow
542a. Passercidus saiuliciclicnsis savanna. 5 1/2 inches. Breast and sides streaked with brownish, and yellow before the eye and also on bend of wing. These finches are very abundant in eastern ...
-Baird Sparrow
545. Coturniculus bairdii. 5 3/4 inches. Crown and nape brownish yellow streaked with black; underparts white streaked on the throat, breast and sides with blackish; tail slightly forked and the ...
-Grasshopper Sparrow
546. Coturniculus savannarum australis. 5 1/2 inches. Crown blackish with a central buffy stripe; nape brown and gray; sides of head, breast and flanks, buffy without streaks. Song. - A weak, ...
-Henslow Sparrow
547. Ammodravius henslotvii. 5 inches. Crown and nape greenish, streaked with black; breast and sides buffy, streaked with black; tail feathers narrow and pointed. This species is of a more ...
-Leconte Sparrow
548. Ammodramus lecontei. 5 inches. Hind head chestnut and gray: sides of head, throat, breast and flanks a rich buff color. Song. - A grasshopper-like squeaking. Nest. - Of grasses in ...
-Sharp-Tailed Sparrow
549. Ammodramus caudacutus. 5 3/4 inches. Back of head greenish; sides of head, breast and flanks buff with black streaks; tail feathers sharp. Salt marshes along the seacoast or along streams ...
-Nelson Sparrow
549a. Ammodramus nelsoni. 5 1/2 inches. Similar to the last but brighter colored and not streaked below. In the Mississippi Valley north to Manitoba. 549a. Acadian Sharp-tailed Sparrow (sub-vir-gatus)...
-Seaside Sparrow
550. Ammodramus maritimus. 6 inches. Yellow spot before the eye. General plumage abve grayish green with no black markings. All the habits of the Seaside Sparrows are precisely like those of the ...
-Dusky Seaside Sparrow
551. Ammodramus nigrescens. 6 inches. Darkest of the Seaside Sparrows. Found only in marshes at head of Indian River, Florida. ...
-Lark Sparrow
552. Chondestes grammacus. 6 1/4 inches. These handsome sparrows are very abundant in the Mississippi Valley: their favorite resorts are fields, pastures and prairie lands, or along dusty ...
-Harris Sparrow
553. Zonotrichia querula. 7 1/2 inches. Adults in summer with the crown, face and throat black; in winter with the black areas mottled with gray. This species is one of the largest of the ...
-White-Crowned Sparrow
554. Zonotrichia leucophrys. 7 inches. Adults with a white crown bordered by black, the black covering the lores or space before the eye (the sub-species found west of the Rockies have the lores ...
-White-Throated Sparrow
558. Zonotrichia albicollis. 6 3/4 inches. In thick underbrush, we hear these birds scratching about among the leaves; occasionally one of them will hop up on a twig and give his clear peabody ...
-Tree Sparrow
559. Spizella monticola. 6 1/4 inches. A blackish-brown spot in middle of breast; crown reddisli brown with no black about the head; back and wings with considerable brown. These Sparrows are ...
-Chipping Sparrow
560. Spizella socialis. 5 1/4 inches. Crown chestnut; forehead black; line through the eye black. One of the commonest and most useful of our Sparrows, frequenting orchards, yards and bushy ...
-Clay-Colored Sparrow
561. Spizella pallida. 5 1/2 inches. No reddish brown in the plumage; crown largely black, with a whitish stripe in centre. The habits of these birds are the same as those of the Chippy; they are ...
-Brewer Sparrow
562. Spizella breweri. 5 1/2 inches. Like the lest species, the general tone of plumage of this is gray. It differs, though, in having the crown finely streaked with blackish. It is a more western ...
-Field Sparrow
563. Spizella pusilla. 5 1/2 inches. Bill pinkish-brown; crown and ear covert brown with no black markings; back reddish brown and breast and sides washed with brown. You will find these birds ...
-Black-Throated Sparrow
573. Amphispiza bilincata. 5 1/2 inches. These little Sparrows are entirely unlike any other North American species. They are found in the southwestern deserts, where they are not uncommon in ...
-Sage Sparrow
574a. Amphispiza belli nevadensis. 6 1/4 inches. These birds are found in arid regions, frequenting the sage brush that is found in the Great Basin region, from western Texas to California. ...
-Pine-Woods Sparrow
575. Pcucaa aestivalis. 5 3/4 inches. Upper parts streaked with black; back chestnut and gray: under parts bully white; tail rounded. These dull-colored birds are abundant on some of the ...
-Song Sparrow
581. Melospiza cinerea melodia. 6 1/4 inches. . This is probably the best known, most abundant and most widely distributed (in its numerous sub-species) of all our birds. They are quite hardy and ...
-Lincoln Sparrow
583. Melo8piza lincolnii. 5 3/4 inches. Upper parts extensively brown and black; breast and sides bright buff with tine black streaks. These flinches are quite abundant in the West, especially ...
-Swamp Sparrow
584. Melospiza georgiana. 5 3/4 inches. Forehead black; crown chestnut with a gray median stripe; whole upper parts very dark; under parts grayish with brown sides. A very quiet and unobtrusive ...
-Fox Sparrow
585. Passerella iliaca. 7 1/4 inches. Above bright reddish brown and gray; rump and tail wholly reddish brown, and spots on the breast and sides of the same color. In winter we find these large ...
-White-Winged Junco
5GG. Junco aikeni. 6 1/2 inches. Slightly larger than the common eastern Junco, and With two white bars on the wing and more white on the tail. This species cannot be regarded as common anywhere...
-Slate-Colored Junco
507. Junco hyemalis. 6 1/4 inches. These are one of our most common winter birds, easily recognized, while perching or on the ground, by the white or pinkish bill, and when flying by the white ...
-Towhee Or Chewink
587. Pipilo erythrophthalmus. 8 inches. A bird of swamps, brushy pastures and open woodlands. They are ground birds and usually found scratching among the leaves; the male, with his black, white and ...
-Green-Tailed Towhee
592.1. Oreospiza chlorura. 7 inches. These are characteristic birds of the Western mountains. They are typical brush birds, satisfied in living a life of security in their own way, and rarely ...
-Cardinal
593. Cardinalis cardinalis. 9 inches. Noble in carriage, beautiful of plumage, amiable in disposition and excellent singers are some of the qualifications of these large-billed birds. They are ...
-Texan Cardinal; Pyrrhuloxia
594a. Pyrrludoxia sinuata texensis. 8 1/2 inches. Notice that the hill of this species is very stout and short, more like that of a parrot. The crest is also composed of fewer feathers than that ...
-Rose-Breasted Grosbeak
595. Zamelodia ludoviciana. 8 inches. Male, black and white with rose breast and under wing coverts; female resembling a large striped Sparrow in color. The center of abundance of these beautiful ...
-Blue Grosbeak
597. Guiraca caerulea. 7 inches. Male, deep blue with chestnut shoulders; female, grayish brown above and grayish white below. Open woods, small groves and roadsides are the locations in which ...
-Indigo Bunting
598. Passerina cyanea. 5 1/2 inches. Male, indigo blue; female, brownish but usually with a faint indication of blue on the wings or tail. A jolly summer songster, dwelling with us from the ...
-Lazuli Sunting
599. Passerina amcena. 5 1/2 inches. This species replaces the preceding one west of the Plains. While the plumage of the males is entirely distinctive, that of the females is often confusing. The ...
-Varied Bunting
600. Passerina versicolor. 5 1/2 inches. This beautiful species is less common than any others of the genus and has a very restricted range in the United States. The plumage of the male birds ...
-Painted Bunting
601. Passerina ciris. 5 1/2 inches. Male, vari-colored; female, greenish gray. Without any exception, these are the most gaudily plumaged North American birds, but their colors have a harshness ...
-Morellet Seed-Eater
602. Sporophila morelleti sharpei. 4 1/2 inches. The male of this interesting little species requires at least three years in which to obtain the perfect plumage as shown in our illustration. The ...
-Dickcissel
604. Spiza americana. 6 1/4 inches. Male beautifully blended with yellow, white and gray, and with a black throat patch and brown shoulders; female duller. In the middle portions of the U. S. ...
-Lark Bunting
605. Calamospiza melanocorys. 7 inches. Male, black and white; female, brown and gray. This species is often known as the White-winged Blackbird, not because it bears any resemblance to any of ...
-Scarlet Tanager
G08. Piranga erythromelas. 7 1/2 inches. Male, scarlet and black; female, greenish yellow and blackish. These beautiful birds are found in open woods, but they often come out in fields, parks, o...
-Summer Tanager
610. Piranga rubra. 7 1/2 inches. Male, rosy red; female, greenish yellow. These Tanagers have a more southerly distribution than the Scarlet variety, but are found in the same kind of ...
-Purple Martin
611. Progne subis. 7 3/4 inches. Male, blue black; female, dull black and grayish. These large, jolly Swallows are commonly seen about cities and towns within their range. Originally they dwelt in ...
-Cliff Swallow
Petrochelidon lunifrons. 5 1/2 inches. Adults similar in plumage but the female slightly paler. Easily distinguished from the Barn Swallow by the square tail and light buffy forehead and rump. T...
-Barn Swallow
613. Hirundo erythrogastra. 7 1/2 inches. Female duller plumaged and with a less deeply forked tail than the male. Forehead and throat chestnut and entire under parts buffy; tail deeply forked and ...
-Tree Swallow
614. Iridoprocne bicolor. 6 inches. Male, steely blue or greenish above; female, duller and often plain gray above, but both sexes always entirely white below. These Swallows are also abundant ...
-Bank Swallow
61G. Riparia riparia. 5 1/4 inches. These are the smallest of our Swallows; this species can be distinguished, even at a distance, by the conspicuous band across the breast, showing in bold relief ...
-Rough-Winged Swallow
617. Stelgidopferyx serriponiis. 5 1/2 inches. In this species the throat is gray as well as the breast. The cuter vane of the outer primary is stiff and bristly, thus giving the species its name. ...
-Bohemian Waxwing
618. Bombycilla garrula. 8 inches. Larger and grayer than our common Cedar Waxwing and with yellow and white on the wing; it is a northern species and is only casually found in eastern U. S. They ...
-Cedar Waxwing
619. Bombycilia cedrorum. 7 inches. Plumage very soft colored with a general brownish tone, shading to gray on the rump. The Waxwings are named from the curious wax-like appendages attached to the ...
-Northern Shrike
621. Lanius borealis. 10 inches. This shrike is larger than any of the species found in summer in the United States and has the breast quite distinctly barred. Shrikes are cruel, rapacious and ...
-Loggerhead Shrike
622. Lanius ludovicianus. 9 inches. Pure white below and with the markings above, intense black instead of the brownish or grayish black of the last species. Although smaller, these Shrikes have the ...
-Red-Eyed Vireo
624. Vireosylvia olivacea. 6 inches. Crown slaty gray with a black border; white stripe above eye; eye reddish brown. Throughout the United States this is one of the most abundant of the family. ...
-Philadelphia Vireo
626. Vireosylvia philadelphica. 5 inches. This is one of the least common of the eastern Vireos, although it is more common than most people know; its song is not distinctive and it keeps high up ...
-Warbling Vireo
627. Vireosylvia gilva. 5 inches. Above olive-green; crown grayer but with no black border. These are among the most common of the Vireos and may be found even in the hearts of large cities, ...
-Yellow-Throated Vireo
628. Lanivireo flavifrons. 5 3/4 inches. Upper parts greenish; throat, breast and line over eye yellow; two prominent whitish wing bars. A handsome Vireo found in localities such as are ...
-Blue-Headed Vireo
629. Lanivireo solitarius. 5 3/4 inches. Crown and sides of head bluish slate; lores, eye-ring and underparts white; back and flanks greenish yellow; two whitish wing bars. This species, to my ...
-Black-Capped Vireo
630. Vireo atricapillus. 4 1/2 inches. Male, with crown and sides of head glossy black, lores and eye-ring white; female, duller colored. This strange and comparatively rare Vireo frequents ...
-White-Eyed Vireo
631. Vireo grisews. 5 inches. This species shows a partiality for low, swampy places, covered with briars or tangled thickets of blackberry vines. Their habits are entirely different from any of ...
-Black And White Warbler
G36. Mniotilta varia. 5 1/4 inches. Male, heavily streaked with black below; female, with only a few streaks on the sides. These Warblers are usually known as Black and White Creepers because of...
-Prothonotary Warbler
637. Protonotaria citrea. 5 1/4 inches. Whole head and underparts intense yellow, almost orange on the head of the male; tail with white spots near the tip; female, duller. A common species in ...
-Swainson Warbler
G38. Helinaia swainsonii. 5 inches. Upper parts brownish; underparts whitish; a white superciliary stripe and a brown stripe through the eye. Some of the habits of this species are similar to th...
-Worm-Eating Warbler
639. Helmitheros vermicorns. 5 1/2 inches. Crown buffy with two black stripes; back, wings and tail olive green with no white markings; below buffy white. These birds are very unsuspicious and ...
-Bachman Warbler
040. Helminthophila bachmanii. 4 1/4 inches. Male, with a yellow forehead, shoulders and under-parts; black cap and breast patch; female, duller and with less black. This species was first disco...
-Blue-Winged Warbler
641. Helminthophila pinus. 4 3/4 inches. Crown and underparts yellow; a narrow black line through the eyes; two broad whitish wing bars. A common bird of the southeastern states and north to ...
-Golden-Winged Warbler
642. Helminthophila chrysoptera. 5 inches. Crown and two large wing bars yellow; throat and ear patches black; rest of plumage gray and white; female with less black. The distribution of this ...
-Nashville Warbler
645. Helminthophila rubricapilla. 4 3/4 inches. Male with a brown crown patch; female duller colored and with no crown patch. Dry side hills covered with young trees are favorite resorts for the ...
-Orange-Crowned Warbler
646. Helminthophila celata. 5 inches. This species is fairly common in the Mississippi Valley but is rare in New England. Its habits are much like those of the last species and it is often mistaken ...
-Tennessee Warbler
647. Helminthophila peregrina. 5 inches. Male, with a gray head and greenish back; female, with the top of the head the same color as the back. A dull-colored bird that, with the exception of ...
-Parula Warbler
648. Compsothlypis americana. 4 1/2 inches. In the summer Parulas are found in wet swamps where the ground is covered with a carpeting of moss which only partially keeps your feet from the water ...
-Sennett Warbler
649. Compsothlypis nigrilora. 4 1/2 inches. A smaller similar bird from southern Texas. Note the black ear patches and lack of black on breast. ...
-Cape May Warbler
650. Dendroica tigrina. 5 inches. Male, with a chestnut wash on the ears and throat; female, duller and with little or no chestnut. In the greater part of eastern North America, Cape May ...
-Yellow Warbler
652. Dendroica aestiva. 5 inches. Male, with chestnut streaks on the sides; female, duller and without the streaks. An abundant bird everywhere in woodland, park, orchard or garden and one of ...
-Black-Throated Blue Warbler
654. Dendroica ccerulescens. 5 1/4 inches. Male, grayish blue above and with a black face, throat, breast and sides; female, grayish olive above, whitish below. Both sexes always have a white ...
-Myrtle Warbler
655. Dendroica coronata. 5 1/2 inches. Yellow patches on crown, sides and rump; outer tail feathers with large white spots; female duller and browner. During migrations these pretty birds are ...
-Magnolia Warbler
657. Dendroica magnolia. 5 inches. Male, with black ear patch, back, and necklace; female, with the black replaced with grayish; both sexes have a yellow rump and white spots midway of the tail ...
-Cerulean Warbler
658. Dendroica carula. 5 inches. Above grayish blue with black streaks, below white with a bluish breast band and streaks on the sides; female washed with greenish above and yellowish below; both ...
-Chestnut-Sided Warbler
659. Dendroica pensylvanica. 5 inches. Yellow crown, black line through eye and on side of throat, and broad chestnut stripe on sides; female, paler and with less chestnut; young greenish yellow ...
-Bay-Breasted Warbler
660. Dendroica castanea. 5 1/2 inches. Male, with crown, throat and sides rich chestnut; female, paler; young and adults in winter, greenish above, streaked with black and with a trace of chestnut ...
-Blackburnian Warbler
662. Dendroica blackburnice. 5 1/4 inches. Male, black above with large white patch on wing, and bases of outer tail feathers white; throat and breast intense orange; female, duller and with the ...
-Black-Poll Warbler
661. Dendroica striata, 5 1/2 inches. Whole crown black; female, without black cap, greenish gray above streaked with black; young paler than the female. These birds are one of the latest of ...
-Yellow-Throated Warbler
G63. Dendroica dominica. 5 1/4 inches. Throat, breast and line from eye to bill yellow. This species has habits very similar to those of the Black and White Creeper, being often seen creeping ar...
-Golden-Cheeked Warbler
666. Dendroica chrysoparia. 4 3/4 inches. In some plumages these birds may be confused with the Black-throated Green. Notice that the adult male has a short median line of yellow on the crown, ...
-Black-Throated Green Warbler
G67. Dendroica virens. 5 inches. Throat black; two wing bars and outer tail feathers white: female with little black on the throat. A common bird in pine groves in northern United States, or dur...
-Kirtland Warbler
670. Dendroica kirtlandi. 5 1/2 inches. Above bluish gray streaked with black; underparts pale yellow streaked on the side with black. This is one of the rarest of American Warblers, and until ...
-Pine Warbler
671. Dendroica vigorsii. 5 1/2 inches. Greenish yellow above, brighter below; two white wing bars and white spots on outer tail feathers; female, duller and grayer. Found only in tracts of ...
-Palm Warbler
672. Dendroica palmarum. 5 1/4 inches. No wing bars, but white spots on the outer tail feathers; crown, cheeks and streaks on the sides chestnut. During migrations you will find these Warblers ...
-Prairie Warbler
073. Dendroica discolor. 4 3/4 inches. Above greenish with chestnut spots on the back; below yellow with black markings; female paler. These are very locally distributed birds and will often be ...
-Oven-Bird
674. Seiurus aurocapillus. 6 inches. Crown orange brown bordered by black; no white in wings or tail. This bird is found in open woods, where it builds its arched nest on the ground among the ...
-Water-Thrush
675. Seiiirus noveboracensis. 6 inches. This species always has a yellowish tinge to the under-parts and the stripes beneath are narrow, but prominent. These Warblers are found in tangled underbrush ...
-Louisiana Water-Thrush
676. Seiurus motacilla. 6 1/4 inches. Larger, grayer above and whiter below than the preceding; stripes fewer and broader. This is a more southern species and breeds from the Gulf to Connecticut and ...
-Kentucky Warbler
677. Opornornis formosa. 5 1/2 inches. Crown and ear coverts black, underparts and line over eye yellow; no white in the plumage. These birds are found in about such localities as are ...
-Connecticut Warbler
678. Opornornis agilis. 5 1/2 inches. Male with a bluish slate-colored head; eye ring white and completely encircling the eye; female with a saffron-colored head. In the United States we find ...
-Mourning Warbler
C79. Opornornis Philadelphia. 5 1/2 inches. Similar to the last, but with no eye ring and with a black patch on the breast. These birds are found in swamps and thickets, as well as among the bus...
-Maryland Yellow-Throat
681. Geothlypis trichas. 5 1/4 inches. One of our most common birds in swamps and also in shrubbery along roadsides or walls. They are very inquisitive, and their bright eyes will peek at you from ...
-Yellow-Breasted Chat
683. Icteria virens. 7 1/2 inches. Breast yellow, lores black, line over the eye and under-parts white; no white on wings or tail. Dry side hills and ravines covered with thick under brush are ...
-Hooded Warbler
684. Wilsonia citrina. 5 1/2 inches. Male, with yellow forehead and cheeks, the rest of the head and throat being black; female, much duller with little or no black; both sexes have white spots on ...
-Wilson Warbler
685. Wisonia pusilla. 5 inches. Male, with black crown patch; female, with the crown greenish like the back. These little fly-catching Warblers are abundant in the United States during ...
-Canadian Warbler
686. Wilsonia canadensis. 5 1/2 inches. Male, with a necklace of black spots, white eye ring and lores; female, and young, with only a slight indication of the necklace. These Warblers travel ...
-American Redstart
687. 8etophaga rutidlla. 5 1/2 inches. Male, black, orange and white; female, grayish, yellow and white; it requires two or three years to attain the black plumage of the male, in the intermediate ...
-American Pipit; Titlark
697. Anthus rubescens. 6 1/2 inches. These are Arctic birds that spend the winter months in the United States. We find them in flocks along roadsides or in fields, feeding upon weed seeds. They are ...
-Sprague Pipit
700. Anthus spraguei. 6 1/4 inches. Upper parts streaked with buff and blackish; below pale buffy with black markings. These birds are found on the Plains from the Dakotas to Hudson Bay in summer, ...
-Sage Thrasher
702. Oroscoptes montamis. 8 3/4 inches. This species is often known as the Mountain Mockingbird because of the brilliance of its song, a very varied performance, long continued and mocking that of ...
-Mockingbird
703. Mimus polyglottos. 10 1/2 inches. General colors, gray and white; bases of primaries and outer tail feathers with white. This is the great vocalist of the south, and by many is considered ...
-Catbird
704. Dumetella carolinensis. 9 inches. General color dark gray with a black cap and chestnut under tail coverts. This is one of the most common birds throughout the United States, being found ...
-Brown Thrasher
705. Toxostoma rufum. 11 1/2 inches. Above bright reddish brown; below white with black spots. Taken as a whole, I think that the song of this Thrasher is the most musical and pleasing of any ...
-Cactus Wren
713. Beleodytes brunneicapillus. 8 1/2 inches. Cactus groves are the favorite resorts of these large Wrens. Often a bed of cactus not more than thirty feet square will contain the homes of half a ...
-Rock Wren
715. Salpinctes obsoletus. 5 3/4 inches. Upper parts stone color, specked with black; rump brownish; imderparts whitish with indistinct streaks on the throat. A common bird on the dry, rocky ...
-Carolina Wren
718. Thryothorus ludovicianus. 5 1/2 inches. Above rusty brown and below washed with the same, the throat and line over the eye being white. Like all the Wrens, this one commonly sits or flits ...
-Bewick Wren
719. Thryomanes bewickii. 5 inches. Above dark brown; below and line over eye whitish; tail blackish with the outer feathers barred with white. Like all the Wrens, these seem to be very ...
-House Wren
721. Troglodytes a'don. 4 3/4 inches. Above brownish with tail and wings barred; below dull grayish, barred on the flanks with brown. These are bold, sociable and confiding birds, seeming to ...
-Winter Wren
722. Nannus hiemalis. 4 inches. Above bright cinnamon, below paler; sides, wings and tail heavily barred with black. This is the shortest and most stoutly built Wren that we have. They look ...
-Short-Billed Marsh Wren
724. Cistothorus stellaris. 5 1/4 inches. This species can readily be distinguished from the next, as the whole crown is streaked with black and white, whereas that of the Long-bill is uniformly ...
-Long-Billed Marsh Wren
725. Telmatodytes palustris. 5 1/4 inches. The bill of this species is .5 inch or more in length; that of the last is .4 inch or less. This species is by far the most abundant. Its eggs are so ...
-Brown Creeper
726. Certhia familiaris americana. 5 1/2 inches. Tail feathers stiffened and pointed; rump rusty. These odd birds are fairly common throughout the United States in winter. They will be found in ...
-White-Breasted Nuthatch
727. Sitta carolinensis. 0 inches. Male with the crown bluish black: female with the crown gray; both sexes with chestnut under tail coverts. These birds seem to he the very opposite of the ...
-Red-Breasted Nuthatch
728. 8itta canadensis. 4 1/2 inches. These birds have the same habits as the larger Nuthatch, but are often found in flocks, while the White-breasted are usually in pairs and in the fall ...
-Brown-Headed Nuthatch
729. Sitta pusilla. 4 1/4 inches. Crown brownish with a white patch on the nape. These diminutive Nuthatches are found in the southern states. Their general habits do not appear to differ from ...
-Tufted Titmouse
731. Baeolophus bicolor. 6 inches. Head crested, forehead black, flanks brownish. The habits of this large Titmouse are almost identical with those of Chickadees. They swing from the ends of twigs in ...
-Black-Crested Titmouse
732. Baeolophus atricristatus. 6 inches. Crest black, forehead white, flanks rusty. The habits of this species are just like those of the very similar preceding one. The birds are very tame, ...
-Black-Capped Chickadee
735. Penthestes atricapillus. 5 1/4 inches. The Chickadees are one of the most popular birds that we have, owing to their uniform good nature even in the coldest weather, and their confiding ...
-Hudsonian Chickadee
740. Penthestes hudsonicus. 5 inches. Crown and back brownish. The habits of this little northerner are like those of the bird that we know so well; if anything they are even more tame than our ...
-Verdin; Yellow-Headed Tit
746. Auriparus flaviceps. 1 1/4 inches. Adult male with the head and throat yellow, usually with some concealed orange-brown on the forehead; lesser wing-coverts reddish brown. The female is ...
-Golden-Crowned Kinglet
748. Regulus satrapa. 4 inches. Male with crown orange and yellow, bordered with black; female with yellow crown. Although very small, these birds are very rugged and endure the severe storm ...
-Ruby-Crowned Kinglet
749. Regulus calendula. 4 1/4 inches. Male with a concealed patch of red on the crown; female with no red. Like the last, these are chiefly winter visitants in the United States and they do not ...
-Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher
751. Polioptila caerulea. 4 1/2 inches. Forehead black; tail black with white edges and tips to the outer ones. Their food is chiefly insects, which they are very expert in catching, taking ...
-Wood Thrush
755. Hylocichla mustelina. 8 inches. Reddish brown above, brightest on the head; below white heavily spotted with black. These large Tnrushes are locally abundant in swamps and moist woodland. ...
-Wilson Thrush Or Veery
756. Hylocichla fuscescens. 7 1/2 inches. Entire upper parts a uniform reddish brown; below soiled white with a few faint marks on the breast. This species is more abundant than the last. It is ...
-Gray-Cheeked Thrush
757. Hylocichla aliciae. 7 1/2 inches. Quite similar to the following but with the eye ring white and the sides of head and breast much paler. Breeds in northern Canada and migrates through the ...
-Olive-Backed Thrush
758a. Hylocichla ustulata swainsonii. 7 1/4 inches. Upper parts wholly olive gray, with no brownish tinge; eye ring, sides of head and breast distinctly buff; breast spotted with blackish. Song....
-Hermit Thrush
759b. Hylocichla guttata pallasii. 6 3/4 inches. Tail reddish brown, much brighter than the back and head; breast quite heavily spotted with black. During its migrations it rarely sings but in ...
-American Robin
761. Planesticus migratorius. 10 inches. Male with a black head and bright reddish-brown breast; female with a gray head and much paler breast; young intermediate between the two and with a reddish-...
-Greenland Wheatear
765a. Saxicola aenathe lcucorrhoa. 6 inches. The Wheatear is a European bird, but this sub-species is found in Greenlaud and occasionally in Labrador. Their habits are about the same as those ...
-Bluebird
766. Sialia sialis. 7 inches. These beautiful, gentle and well-known birds spend the winter in the southern parts of the United States and north to the snow line; some more hardy than the rest are ...
-Field Key For Identification Of Eastern Land Birds. By Conspicuous Markings
We have added this key at the request of many of our readers for a color scheme for identification. It includes all the birds that have markings of sufficient prominence to be readily noticed in the f...
-Classified Table Of Eastern Land Birds
Showing Divisions into Orders, Families and Genera, as Adopted by the American Ornithologists' Union. ORDER PSITTACI. Parrots, Macaws, etc. Family PSITTACIDA...
-North American Birds' Eggs
By Chester A. Reed, B. S. This is the only book on the market that gives illustrations of the eggs of North American birds. Each egg is shown full size, photographed directly from an authentic and ...









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