books



previous page: British Dogs: Their Varieties, History, Characteristics, Breeding, Management, And Exhibition | by Hugh Dalziel
  
page up: Dog Books
  
next page: British Dogs, Their Points, Selection, And Show Preparation | by W. D. Drury

The Dogs Of The British Islands | by J. H. Walsh



Being a series of articles on the points of their various breeds, and the treatment of the diseases to which they are subject.

TitleThe Dogs Of The British Islands
AuthorJ. H. Walsh
PublisherHorace Cox
Year1882
Copyright1882, Horace Cox
AmazonThe Dogs Of The British Islands

By J. H. Walsh ("Stonehenge"), Editor Of "The Field" (With The Aid Of Several Experienced Breeders).

Fourth Edition.

-Preface To The Fourth Edition
SINCE the third edition of this book was published so short a time has elapsed that very little change in, or addition to, the Dogs of the British Islands is to be noticed. In the sporting division ...
-Part I. Book I. Management Of Dogs In Health. Chapter I. Kennel Management Of Urge Dogs
THE kennel management of greyhounds, foxhounds, harriers, and other sporting dogs varies almost with each kind. Thus, greyhounds are most carefully protected from the weather by a roof to their yard a...
-Chapter II. House Management Of Pet Dogs
PETDOGS require a different treatment, to understand which it will be better to begin at the beginning. We will suppose that a puppy six weeks old, and of a breed not exceeding 151b. weight, is presen...
-Book II. Drugs Commonly Used For The Diseases Of Dogs, And Their Modes Of Administration
[It it to be constantly borne in mind that the doses given below are those tutted to the dog of average site and strength. Where, therefore, the patient it a toy dog, the dote mutt be reduced to one-t...
-Chapter I. The Action Of Medicines, And The Forms In Which They Are Generally Prescribed
ALTERATIVES. LTERATTVES are intended to produce a fresh and healthy action, instead of the previous disordered function. The precise mode of action is not well understood, and it is only by the result...
-Anodynes
Anodyne medicines are given either to soothe the general nervous system, or to stop diarrhoea; or something to relieve spasm, as in colic or tetanus. Opium is the chief anodyne used in canine veterina...
-Antispasmodics
Antispasmodics, as their name implies, are medicines which are intended to counteract excessive muscular action, called spasm, or, in the limbs, cramp. 1. Antispasmodic Mixture Laudanum and sulphuri...
-Aperients
Aperients, or purges are those medicines which quicken or increase the evacuations from the bowels, varying, however, a good deal in their mode of operation. Some act merely by exciting the muscular c...
-Astringents
Cause contraction in those living tissues with which they come in contact, whether in the interior or exterior of the body; and whether immediately applied or by absorption into the circulation. They ...
-Blisters
Require great care in their application to the skin of the dog, and should never be used without a muzzle, which may only be removed during feeding time. Before applying them, cut off the hair with sc...
-Caustics
Are substances which burn away the living tissues of the body, by the decomposition of their elements. They are of two kinds, viz., first, the actual cautery, consisting in the application of the burn...
-Cordials
Are medicines which act as warm temporary stimulants, augmenting the strength and spirits when depressed, and often relieving an animal from the ill-effects of over-exertion. 1. Cordial Balls Powder...
-Diuretics
Are medicines which promote the secretion and discharge of urine, the effect being produced in a different manner by different medicines ; some acting directly upon the kidneys by sympathy with the st...
-Emetics
Are sometimes required for the dog, though not so often as is commonly supposed. Vomiting is a natural process in that animal, and seldom wants provoking; indeed, if emetics are often had recourse to,...
-Expectorants
Excite or promote a discharge of mucus from the lining membrane of the bronchial tubes, thereby relieving inflammation and allaying cough. 1. Expectorant Bolus Ipecacuanha powder, 1 to 1 1/2 grains;...
-Liniments Or Embrocations
Are applied to the skin for the purpose of producing counter-irritation, and are specially useful in chronic rheumatism, colic, etc. The most generally useful is the following: - Laudanum, liquid amm...
-Febrifuges
Fever medicines are given to allay fever, which they do by increasing the secretions of urine and sweat, and also by reducing the action of the heart. 1. Febrifuge Pill Calomel, 1 to 3 grains; digit...
-Ointments
Are greasy applications, by means of which certain substances are brought into contact with the vessels of the skin. 1. Mange Ointment Green iodide of mercury, 1 drachm; lard 1 ounce. Mix, and rub i...
-Stomachics
Are given to increase the tone of the stomach in particular. 1. Stomachic Pill Extract of gentian, 5 grains; powdered rhubarb, 2 grains. Mix, and give twice a day. 2. Stomachic Draught Tincture of...
-Styptics
Styptics are remedies which have a tendency to stop the flow of blood either from internal or external surfaces. They are used either by the mouth, or to the part itself in the shape of lotions, Ac.; ...
-Tonics
Augment the vigour of the whole body permanently, whilst stimulants only act for a short time. They are chiefly useful after low fever. 1. Tonic Pills Disulph&te of quinine, 1 to 3 grains; ginger, 2...
-Washes Or Lotions
1. Mange Wash Calvert's carbolic wash diluted with twenty times its bulk of water, and rubbed into the roots of the hair in red mange. 2. Bishop's Mange Lotion 2. Bishop's Mange Lotion is a prepara...
-Worm Medicines
1. Areca nut powdered, of which 2 grains for every pound the dog weighs is the dose, for worms generally. 2. Santonine is the remedy for round worm. Dose for the average dog, 3 grains in a pill. 3. ...
-Chapter II. Administration Of Remedies
ITHOUT some little patience and a knowledge of the temper of the dog, it is often very difficult to administer physic in any shape. A large powerful animal, of a savage temper, is scarcely to be contr...
-Book III. The Ordinary Diseases Of The Dog And Their Treatment. Chapter I. Fevers. Simple Ephemeral Fever
IN the Dog, simple fever is merely a condition in which there is first a chilliness, accompanied by actual increase of surface heat, and quick respiration and pulse; then loss of appetite and diminish...
-Simple Epidemic Fever, Or Influenza
This species of fever is closely allied to the preceding variety in everything but the cause, which, instead of being exposure to cold, is some peculiar condition of the air, to which the name epidemi...
-Distemper
Distemper may be defined as a feverish disease, always marked by rapid loss of strength and flesh, in proportion to the severity of the attack. It may occur at any period of life, and even more than o...
-Distemper. Continued
To distinguish these several forms of distemper from the diseases which most nearly resemble them, it is chiefly necessary to bear in mind that the peculiarity of distemper, especially in its malignan...
-Rheumatic Fever
Or Acute Rheumatism, is a very common disease in the dog, though not very generally attended to or described by writers on their complaints. It arises from exposure to cold, when the dog has been over...
-Chronic Rheumatism
This generally receives a specific name according to the part attacked. Thus, if it seizes on the muscles of the chest or shoulders, it is called Kennel Lameness, or Chest-Founder, which is the great ...
-Chapter II. Inflammations. Rabies
(Improperly called Hydrophobia.) POST MORTEM examination has not revealed with certainty the exact seat of this disease, but there is little doubt that it is confined to the spinal cord and base of t...
-Tetanus
Is a disease very similar in its nature to rabies, but manifesting itself in spasms of the muscles, rather than in general irritability of them. I have, however, only seen one case in the dog, which w...
-Turnside
Appears to be an inflammation of one side of the brain only, producing a tendency to turn round in a circle, like the gidd of sheep. It is rather a rare disease, and is easily recognised by the abo...
-Inflammations Of The Eye
The Eye is the seat of various inflammations, coming on from causes totally distinct from one another. Thus, in distemper, there is generally an inflammation, with discharge, and sometimes the inexper...
-Inflammations Of The Ear
Deafness often arises from severe cold, and may then be expected to disappear as the dog recovers, but it is sometimes congenital, and when such is the case, no remedies are of any avail. If it comes ...
-Inflammation Of The Mouth
The Mouth is liable to inflammation from decayed teeth, or from the collection of tartar about them. The only remedy is the removal of these causes of irritation. Warts sometimes infest the month to ...
-Inflammation Of The Nose (Ozena)
The Nose is sometimes attacked by inflammation of its lining membrane, producing a stinking discharge, which the dog is constantly dropping about. A solution of chloride of zinc (2 grains to the ounce...
-Inflammation Of The Skin
Mange is the kennel term for several inflammations of the skin, whether acute or chronic, the chief popular distinction from surfeit or blotch being, that it is communicable from one to the other by c...
-Inflammation Of The Organs Of Respiration
The Larynx, situated at the top of the windpipe, is not so often the seat of acute inflammation as in man and the horse, but chronic laryngitis is by no means unfrequent in the dog. Both are recognise...
-Pleurisy Symptoms
Symptoms Of Acute Pleurisy Commence with shivering, with slight spasms and sweats. Inspiration short, unequal, and interrupted, as from pain; expiration full; air expired not hotter than usual. Sligh...
-Pneumonia Symptoms
Symptoms Of Acute Pneumonia Commence with shivering, without spasms. Inspiration full; expiration short; air expired hot, Nostrils red in the interior. Cough generally violent, with expectoration of ...
-Bronchitis Symptoms
Symptoms Of Acute Bronchitis Commence also with shivering, followed by constant hard cough. Air expired warm, but not so hot as in pneumonia. Inspiration and expiration both full. Cough after a time ...
-Inflammation Of The Organs Of Nutrition
Gastritis, or inflammation of the stomach, is either acute or chronic. Acute gastritis is generally caused by poison administered wilfully, or by some similar accidental circumstance, such as highly-s...
-Inflammation Of The Intestines
May be said to be divided into four varieties, though one of them is more of a spasmodic than of an inflammatory nature; these are - first, peritoneal inflammation; secondly, colic, or inflammation an...
-Inflammation Of The Kidney And Bladder
Inflammation of the Kidney is not very common in the dog, but it sometimes occurs from the use of turpentine as a vermifuge. Very rarely there is met with in the kidney a formation of stone, called ...
-Chorea And Shaking Palsy
The former is almost always a sequel of distemper, and may be known by the peculiar nodding of the head, or twitch of the fore-leg, which all dog owners must have seen. Shaking palsy is a general agit...
-Epilepsy
May be distinguished from the fits of puppyhood by the great champing of the jaws and struggling of the limbs during the fit, and also by the frothing at the mouth which is generally an accompaniment ...
-General Dropsy
Anasabca, or general dropsy in the dog, is not a very uncommon disease among old kennelled dogs, owing to the improper way in which they are fed and kept without exercise. It consists of an infiltrati...
-Worms
The Presence of Worms in the intestinal canal is one of the greatest annoyances to the proprietors of dogs of all classes. In the greyhound they are a constant source of mischief, and in the other var...
-Rickets And Enlarged Joints
When a puppy is unable to stand strongly on his legs, which are more or less twisted and the joints enlarged, the condition is known by the name rickets, and if the case is a bad one, he had better be...
-Cancer And Fungus Haematodes
These malignant diseases usually attack the bitch either in the uterus or teats. Cancer, in the early stage, is known by its peculiar hardness, while fungus is distinguished by its comparatively soft ...
-Encysted Tumours
Are very common in the dog, and consist of small soft bags, lying close under the skin, of a circular form, and devoid of pain or inflammation. They vary in size from that of a pea to the volume of a ...
-Diseases Of Parturition
In Healthy Parturition the bitch seldom suffers much; but sometimes in a small bitch, when the sire is of much larger size, the disproportion between the whelps and the mother is so great as to occasi...
-Cuts, Tears, And Bites
Are easily treated in the dog, because his skin is very readily healed, though not so speedily or in the same manner as that of man. In man a clean cut, if properly treated, heals as if by magic; and ...
-Fractures
May easily be treated in the dog by any person possessed of ordinary mechanical ingenuity. The bones most commonly fractured are those of the extremities; but almost all throughout the body are at tim...
-Dislocations
Consist in a displacement of the end of a bone from its connexion with the one above it; and they may occur at the hip, stifle, shoulder-joint, or knee, as well as the joints of the toes. The hock is ...
-Book IV. Judging At Dog Shows And Field Trials. Chapter I. Judging At Shows
WHATEVER difference of opinion may exist as to the utility of dog shows in improving the breeds of this animal, there can be no doubt of their popularity, or that they have become permanent institutio...
-"On Judging At Dog Shows"
It is needless for us to return to the much-vexed questions relating to the discrepancies between the decisions given on the merits of competing dogs at the various exhibitions of those animals which...
-"On Judging At Dog Shows". Part 2
Having thus reached a stage when it may be laid down as decided that the judges of our shows are to be guided by a written code of laws, it may reasonably be deduced that they shall carry out this co...
-"On Judging At Dog Shows". Part 3
In addition to the cases mentioned above, numerous instances have occurred in which the advantages of judging by points, had it been acted upon, would have been made manifest; and in the present absen...
-"On Judging At Dog Shows". Part 4
There is a very general impression in the minds of judges that the method here advocated would be a great waste of time; and on one occasion, at the recent show of bull dogs by the club specially form...
-Chapter II. On Judging At Field Trials
THE judging at Field Trials has for some years been conducted on the above principles at Stafford and Shrewsbury, without any negative points, which were, however, introduced at Vaynol, in September, ...
-On Judging At Field Trials. Part 2
At Shrewsbury a scale of points originally drawn up by Mr. Brailsford is adopted, in which a certain value is attached to the several qualities demanded in the setter and pointer in the abstract, cal...
-On Judging At Field Trials. Part 3
Now, if the object of these trials is to reward the owner of the best dog in each stake with the first prize, we think the evidence afforded by the proceedings at these two meetings is strongly in fa...
-Part II. Sporting Dogs. Book I. Dogs Used With The Gun. Chapter I. Setters
General Remarks - The English Setter - The Black and Tan or Gordon Setter - The Irish Setter. General Remarks THE four divisions of the United Kingdom may be said to have each a breed of setters pec...
-Part II. Sporting Dogs. Book I. Dogs Used With The Gun. Chapter I. Setters. Continued
The greater frequency of a good nose without tail action in the pointer than in the setter, supposing it to exist, may, I think, be explained in the following way. Both the original pointer and the ...
-The English Setter
Since the first publication of the articles on the various breeds of dogs in the Field, during the years 1865-6, the strain of English setters known by the name of Laverack, from the gentleman who b...
-The English Setter. Part 2
The most remarkable feature in the Laverack breed of setters is the extraordinary extent to which in-breeding has been carried, as shown in the pedigree of Countess, given by Mr. Laverack in his book ...
-The English Setter. Part 3
In 1875 it is true he turned the tables on Mr. Macdona's dog, who was out of all form at that meeting, but he could only get second to Viscount Downe's Sam, who was consequently at once added to Mr. L...
-The English Setter. Part 4
Moreover, Dan at Shrewsbury had a very narrow escape of defeat by Bake, as recorded by myself at the time, so that on mature reflection I have no hesitation in placing him below the first class; but p...
-The Black-Tan Setter
(Sometimes called Gordon.) The black-tan setter, until the institution of shows, was commonly called Gordon, from the fact that the Dukes of Gordon had long possessed a strain of setters of that co...
-The Irish Setter
This breed has long been known to sportsmen throughout Great Britain as a good one, especially in point of stamina, and a class was set apart for it at Birmingham in 1860, a year before the black and ...
-The Irish Setter. Continued
In points the Irish setter only differs from the English in the following: 1. The skull is somewhat longer and narrower, the eyebrows being well raised, and the occipital prominence as marked as in t...
-The Modern Pointer
IN selecting the setter for the first of the articles on the dog in the present series, I have not intended to fix the comparative claims of these two dogs to superiority in the field. It is alleged t...
-The Modern Pointer. Part 2
Up to the time of the institution of dog shows, the lemon and whites were little valued in comparison with the liver and whites; but Mr. H. Gilbert's L'ob and Major (the latter sold to Mr. Smith, of T...
-The Modern Pointer. Part 3
The best strain of the lemon and whites has been almost entirely in Mr. Whitehouse's hands, he having had a succession of winners from the time of Hamlet to the present day, and his sideboard groaning...
-The Dropper
This breed, between the setter and pointer, is often very good in the field; but after the first cross it does not succeed. The two varieties do not seem to amalgamate; as in the same litter may be fo...
-The Modern Field Spaniel
AMONG the earliest records of venerie in England, the spaniel is alluded to as used for hawking and netting, and he claims, with the greyhound, the bulldog, and the mastiff, the honour of having been ...
-The Modern Cocker
The above title includes every kind of field spaniel except the Sussex and Clumber, and it is therefore necessary to allude to the Norfolk Spaniel as well as to the Welsh and Devon Cocker. The Norfolk...
-The Sussex Spaniel
Until the year 1872, Sussex spaniels were never distinguished as a separate class at any of our shows, being admitted only as other than Clumber, or as large spaniels. In that year, however, the ...
-The Clumber Spaniel
Since the publication of the article on this spaniel in the year 1865, no change is to be recorded in the opinions on its merits nor have the specimens exhibited shown any improvement in shape or qual...
-The Irish Water Spaniel
In Ireland two breeds of this dog are known, which are distinguished by the prefixes North and South, the latter being also named after Mr. M'Carthy, a gentleman who, between thirty and forty years ag...
-The English Water Spaniel
Although a class for this variety of the spaniel is often included in the prize hists of our shows, the exhibits are generally of a most miscellaneous character, and I do not pretend to be able to set...
-Chapter IV. Retrievers
The Retrieves Proper - The Watt-Coated Retrieves - The Curly-Coated Black Retriever - Retrievers other than Black - Wildfowl Retrievers - The Deerhound. IS there are several purposes for which dogs a...
-1. - The Retriever Proper
Until within the last twenty years, many good sportsmen were not satisfied unless their pointers and setters retrieved the game shot to them, and Gen. Hutchinson still maintains that it is a good plan...
-(A) The Wavy-Coated Retrieves
It is generally supposed that this breed is a cross between the Labrador dog, or the small St. John's, Newfoundland, and the setter; but in the present day the most successful on the show bench, as ab...
-(B) The Black Curly-Coated Retriever
Little or nothing seems to be known of the history of this dog, now so extensively bred throughout the United Kingdom. At all events, there is no getting at the exact source of the breed, and on that ...
-(C) The Retrievers Other Than Black
Classes defined as above have been made specially with a view to include those liver-coloured specimens which are met with constantly in litters bred from black curly-coated parents, indicating the sp...
-(D) Wildfowl Retrievers
A great difference of opinion exists as to the comparative merits of the Labrador and the curly-coated retriever for water. In any case, the latter is not improved by the setter cross for this purpose...
-2. - The Deerhound
This dog is now more ornamental than useful, his former trade of retrieving wounded deer in Scotland being often entrusted to colleys, whole or half-bred, and cross-bred dogs of various kinds, but in ...
-2. - The Deerhound. Continued
6. Back And Back Ribs (Value 10) Without a powerful loin a large dog like this cannot sustain the sweeping stride which he possesses, and therefore a deep and wide development of muscle filling up th...
-Book II. Hounds And Their Allies. Chapter I. The Greyhound
AS ITS NAME IMPLIES, this variety of the dog must be classed with the hounds, but it differs from all the others of this division in being used for the pursuit of hares by the eye alone. Its congener,...
-The Greyhound. Part 2
1. The Head (Value 10) I have already said that in my opinion, the head should be large between the ears, and in a dog from 25in. to 26in. high, should measure at least 14 1/2in. in circumference m...
-The Greyhound. Part 3
5. Hind Quarters (Value 20) These are of more importance than the fore quarters, and are composed of three separate divisions, varying greatly in total and comparative length in different individual...
-Chapter II. Modern Hounds Hunting By Nose
General Remarks - The Bloodhound - The Foxhound - The Harrier - The Beagle - The Otterhound. UNDER this general heading are included by sportsmen those varieties of the dog which pursue and kill thei...
-The Bloodhound
The majestic head of this dog has frequently attracted the notice of the poetical and pictorial artist, and, without doubt, he is deserving of it; indeed, from this point of view, he probably excels t...
-The Bloodhound. Continued
Points Of The Bloodhound value Head..... 15 Ears and eyes...... 10 Flews...... 5 Neck......... 5 35 val...
-The Foxhound
No dog has for so long a time been carefully bred, reared, and trained in large numbers as the English foxhound. Up to the time of the passing of the present Game Laws, the public greyhound was confin...
-The Harrier
In the present day it is very difficult to meet with a harrier possessed of blood entirely unmixed with that of the foxhound, though many a master will no doubt put in a claim to that distinction. The...
-The Beagle
This little hound is probably as old a breed as the northern hound, being, in fact, a miniature specimen of it. It was formerly very much in demand for hunting the hare on foot; but went out of fashio...
-The Otter Hound
This hound, by an oversight, was entirely overlooked in the first edition of the Dogs of the British Islands, although there are few breeds of a more distinct character and type. Packs of these houn...
-The Smooth Fox Terrier
FROM the very commencement of foxhunting in this country, small terriers were kept at each of the various kennels, for the purpose of bolting the fox from his earth when run to ground by the hounds. O...
-The Smooth Fox Terrier. Part 2
The greatest care should be taken in first entering terriers, as with hounds. If a deerhound is not properly entered, he will seize the haunch of a stag, and there hold him. A well-known keen sportsma...
-The Smooth Fox Terrier. Part 3
Disqualifying Points. 1. Nose, white, cherry, or spotted to a considerable extent with either of these colours. 2. Ears, prick, tulip, or rose. 3. Mouth, much undershot. There is no breed of dog ...
-The Rough Fox Terrier
Until within the last thirty years a rough or broken-haired terrier, differing altogether from the modern Skye, Dandie, and Yorkshire blue-tan, was commonly met with throughout England, where, curious...
-The Dachshund, Or German Badger-Dog
This dog is generally considered in Germany to be of a pure and independent breed, for a long time confined to the mountain chain and high forests of Southern and Central Europe, extending through Ger...
-The Dachshund, Or German Badger-Dog. Part 2
1. The Skull (Value 10) 1. The skull (value 10) is long and slightly arched, the occiput being wide, and its protuberance well developed; eyebrows raised, but without any marked stop. 2. The Jaw (...
-The Dachshund, Or German Badger-Dog. Part 3
In recent times those points are somewhat modified, but the desire for houndlike type seems to prevail still. In the Field of January 13,1877,1 find published a short scheme of points on dachshunds...
-The Dachshund, Or German Badger-Dog. Part 4
Points. Head, elongated, large, and combined with the neck in a rather obtuse angle. When viewed from the side, the protuberance of the occiput is not much developed; skull not high vaulted; forehead...
-The Dachshund, Or German Badger-Dog. Part 5
Forelegs very short, strong in bone; forearm well clothed with muscles; knee broad and clean; pasterns strong, broad, and not too short; feet broad, rounded, with thick large toes, hard soles, and str...
-The Dachshund, Or German Badger-Dog. Part 6
Colour: black and tan is the most ancient and legitimate colour of the class; but this colour is not so constant as to prevent the accidental appearance of a puppy whose colour varies into any tinge o...
-The Dachshund, Or German Badger-Dog. Part 7
4. Variegated Varieties (Tiger-Dachs) 4. Variegated varieties (tiger-dachs) : Slate, mouse, silvery-grey, with irregular black, chocolate or, tan stripes and blotches, with or without tan marks; eyes...
-The Dachshund, Or German Badger-Dog. Part 8
In hunting above ground the dachshund follows more the track than the general scent (witterung) of the game; therefore he follows rather slowly, but surely, and with the nose pretty close to the groun...
-The Basset-Hound
A few years ago both the name and appearance of this breed were strange to the untravelled Englishman. One or two basset-hounds may have been imported as curiosities by dog lovers who had come across ...
-The Basset-Hound. Continued
The extent of crook, and the respective merits of torse, and demi-torse, have excited some attention amongst breeders. As the result of my inquiries made of French sportsmen on this subject, it ...
-Part III. Non-Sporting Dogs. Book I. Watch Dogs. Chapter I. The Bulldog And Mastiff. The Bulldog
UNTIL the early part of the nineteenth century the bulldog was bred with great care in this country for the purpose of baiting the bull, which up to that time formed one of the most popular out-of-doo...
-The New Bulldog Club's Scale Of Mams Fob Judging Bulldogs By Points
In adopting the principle of distributing 100 marks amongst the several points of the bulldog, the Bulldog Club has followed the example of the old National Dog Club, with whose valuation of the sepa...
-The New Bulldog Club's Scale Of Mams Fob Judging Bulldogs By Points. Continued
13. Hind Legs And Feet (Value 5) The hind legs should be well turned out at the stifles, and in at the hocks, giving an appearance of what is called cow hocks. The hocks should be straight and nea...
-The English Mastiff
Like the bulldog, the old English mastiff was bred in this country in the earliest times of which we have any reliable record; but, whether in these former ages the two breeds were distinctly separate...
-The English Mastiff. Part 2
I will mention three other dogs. The first, Lord Waldegrave's Turk, better known as 'Couchez,' was the foundation of Mr. Lukey's breed. This dog has frequently been described to me by Bill George and...
-The English Mastiff. Part 3
A great deal has been written lately, on the bad effect of the bull cross, as exhibited in King and his stock; but I quite agree with Capt. Garnier in thinking that the injurious results complained of...
-The English Mastiff. Part 4
1. The Head (Value 20) 1. The head (value 20) is broad, full, and flat in its general character; but this flatness is made up of two gentle swells with a furrow between, as well shown in the portrait...
-Chapter II. The Newfoundland, Labrador, St. Bernard, And Dalmatian Dogs. The Newfoundland Dog
TWO distinct types of this breed are now generally admitted - one considerably larger than the other, and known as the Newfoundland, from its being generally found on the island of that name; while th...
-The Newfoundland, Labrador, St. Bernard, And Dalmatian Dogs. The Newfoundland Dog. Continued
Numberless anecdotes are told of the sagacity and fidelity of this dog, and notably of his desire to save life in cases of threatened drowning. The Rev. S. Atkinson, of Gateshead, had a narrow escape ...
-The Labrador Or Lessee Newfoundland Dog
This dog, also called the St. John Newfoundland, is described in the article on the wavy-coated retriever in the 2nd part of this book; and as his use in this country is almost entirely confined to re...
-The St. Bernard Dog
Until about twelve years ago, this variety of the dog was comparatively unknown in the British Isles, except on canvas. Landseer and Ansdell had repeatedly portrayed the majestic form and benevolent e...
-The St. Bernard Dog. Continued
The two strains, rough and smooth, are considered to be distinct enough to require separate classes, but sometimes a litter is composed of specimens of each. Except in coat, there is little or no diff...
-The Dalmatian Dog
Without doubt, the Dalmatian is a pointer when at home; but in this country he has never been used, so far as I know, except to accompany a carriage, in which capacity he is unrivalled. Our English po...
-The Colley Dog
WHENEVER a serious controversy occurs in relation to the general character of any breed of our domestic animals, or to any peculiarity said to exist in it, there is often strong reason to conclude tha...
-The Colley Dog. Part 2
A great deal of discussion has also lately taken place in regard to the colley's proper colour and general appearance, and various descriptions have been given of what each writer considers the genuin...
-The Colley Dog. Part 3
In Scotland and the north of England, as well as in Wales, a great variety of breeds is used for tending sheep, depending greatly on the locality in which they are employed, and on the kind of sheep a...
-The Bob-Tailed Sheepdog
Until within the last half-century sheepdogs without tails were exempt from taxation, it being supposed that no one would keep a tailless dog who could afford to pay the tax. As a consequence, almost ...
-Chapter II. The Pomeranian Or Spitz Dog, Loup-Loup
WITHIN the last twenty years this dog has been largely imported from Germany and France, in addition to those bred in this country; but, nevertheless, he has not become so general a favourite as was e...
-Book III. Terriers (Other Than Fox And Tot). Chapter I. Nondescript Terriers
SINCE the first edition of this book was published, a considerable change has taken place in the type of several of the terrier family. At that time the Yorkshire terrier was represented by an animal ...
-The Skye Terrier
FOLLOWING the plan which I have adopted throughout the present series of articles, I shall not pretend to ascertain what was the original type of the Skye Terrier, as bred in the island to which he ow...
-The Prick-Eared Skye Terrier
Differs from the variety above described, in having a larger head, a shorter body, and usually a rougher coat. The ears should stand well up without any outward inclination, and they are only covered ...
-The Dandie Dinmont Terrier
No variety of the dog has caused such constantly recurring controversies as the Dandie. In the early days of dog shows the classes allotted to it were very badly filled, the breed not having largely p...
-The Dandie Dinmont Terrier. Part 2
In the following letter afterwards published in The Field, Mr. Bradshaw Smith denies this asserted elongation of the body and ears of the Dandie, and also of the dachshund cross; and, as his authority...
-The Dandie Dinmont Terrier. Part 3
1. Head (Value 10) Strongly made and large, not out of proportion to the dog's size, the muscles showing extraordinary development, more especially the maxillary. Skull broad between the ears, gettin...
-The Dandie Dinmont Terrier. Part 4
In corroboration of my opinions as to the change of shape in the Dandie Dinmont, I insert, with the writer's kind permission, the following letter, published in The Field subsequently to the appearanc...
-The Bedlington Terrier
Of all the varieties of terriers, not one owes more to dog shows than the Bedlington. Until these institutions came in vogue they were almost unknown out of their own district, having the strictly loc...
-The Yorkshire Terrier
This terrier is a genuine product of the county from which he takes his name. Undoubtedly a manufactured article, and the most recent addition to our varieties, he may be described as the newest goods...
-The Irish Terrier
I believe I am only repeating an admitted fact when I say that the progress of this breed in the last few years is almost without precedent. In 1878 the original supporters and discoverers of the bree...
-The Irish Terrier. Continued
While such pitiful blunders in the awards were an every show occurrence, it was rather a wonder the breed did not deteriorate instead of only standing still. To-day I may safely say they rival in popu...
-The Black And Tan Terrier. The Manchester Terrier
THE Black and Tan Terrier has as good a right to be considered the representative of the old English terrier as any breed in existence, and probably a better one; but not yet having been blessed with ...
-The Black And Tan Terrier. The Manchester Terrier. Continued
1. The Head (Value 5) 1. The head (value 5) must be long and narrow, clean cut, tight skinned, with no bulging out at the cheeks; the skull flat and narrow. 2. The Jaws And Teeth (Value 5) The muzz...
-The White English Terrier
Although a separate class is made in the programmes of most of our large dog shows for this breed, under the title terriers except black and tan, the difference between it and the black and tan is o...
-The Bull Terrier
The Bull Terrier, like his chief progenitor, the bulldog, is now without a vocation, dog fights being prohibited by law, and rat pits being equally out of the question. But, unlike the bulldog, he is ...
-The Scotch Terrier
A small rough terrier under the above name has for many years been known in . England, and accepted by the inhabitants of that country as identical with the true breed as recognised in Scotland. Withi...
-The Airedale Terrier
Most visitors to North of England shows must have been struck by the appearance of the large rough-coated dogs which it is now the fashion to style Airedale terriers. The animal itself is simply the o...
-The King Charles Spaniels And Blenheim Spaniels
THE King Charles and Blenheim Spaniels have respectively received their names, the former from the patronage afforded to them by the Merry Monarch, and the latter from that of the Marlborough famil...
-The Maltese Dog
A pure white silky coated little dog with long hair has been a ladies' pet from the earliest ages of which we have any record. From some cause or other, a breed of these dogs introduced into the Londo...
-The Rough Toy Terrier
Like the black and tan toy terrier, the rough terrier exactly resembles its larger prototype in all but size. Its description, together with an illustration, is given in the article on the Yorkshire T...
-Chapter II. Smooth Toy Dogs. The Pug
AS is the case with most, if not all, of our existing breeds of the dog, the origin of the pug is lost in obscurity. The prevailing opinion is that he is a bulldog modified by a hot climate; but this ...
-Smooth Toy Dogs. The Pug. Continued
Since the decade above mentioned, both strains have been crossed with the bulldog, with a view to enlarge the skull and shorten the face; and the consequence is that many of the best dogs in other res...
-The Italian Greyhound
This elegant little pet resembles its English sporting congener in shape and colour, differing mainly in its diminutive size, and in the remarkable prancing action which it almost invariably exhib...
-The Smooth Toy Terrier
In the rough and smooth varieties of the terrier, distinctions are made between the larger and the toy classes, but this is chiefly noticeable in the black and tan, though the rough toys are still ver...
-The Poodle
THE POODLE was (and to a certain extent is still) the water spaniel par excellence of Continental shooters; but the fact that draining is carried on to an unlimited extent has necessarily curtailed co...
-The Poodle. Part 2
Der kleine Pintsch, or the little griffon (Aquaticus gryphus). The peculiarities of this mixed race lead to the supposition that it is a product of a cross between the little poodle and the Pomeranian...
-The Poodle. Part 3
In winter time, however, when severe frosts have set in, and long nights are to be spent at the hut or in a bachot (i.e., a flat-bottomed wildfowling punt), it would not do to have the dogs' bodies pa...
-The Poodle. Part 4
It is, however, chiefly in the retrieving part of his business that the poodle distinguishes himself. He is so patient and so indefatigable, and so sensible in his search for wounded or dead game, tha...
-The Truffle-Dog
We are far behind the Germans, French, and Italians in our knowledge of esculent fungi. Our Continental neighbours are far more skilled, both in their preservation and production. They can dry them or...
-The Chinese Crested Dog
The truffle dog is a delicate animal to rear, and a choice feeder. Being continually propagated from one stock, he has become peculiarly susceptible of all dog diseases, and when that fatal year comes...
-The Chinese Edible Dog
The Chinese edible dog has been long well known in this country as a curiosity, but the variety furnished with a crest and tufted tail is by no means common, like the ordinary breed, it is quite hairl...
-The Great Dane
The dog has so frequently been represented on canvas that it would be idle to refuse a description of it in a work professing to treat of the dog in all his varieties. So commences the paragraph on ...









TOP
previous page: British Dogs: Their Varieties, History, Characteristics, Breeding, Management, And Exhibition | by Hugh Dalziel
  
page up: Dog Books
  
next page: British Dogs, Their Points, Selection, And Show Preparation | by W. D. Drury