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British Dogs At Work | by A. Croxton Smith



The letterpress of this book makes no pretence of competing with the excellent works that are already in existence, its object being to afford some help and interest to the thousands who keep one or two dogs as workers or as pets, or to the more limited number who may contemplate getting together a kennel for purposes of exhibition. From the questions that are frequently reaching me, I have come to the conclusion that many will be grateful for advice upon the common ailments from which dogs are liable to suffer, free from unnecessary technicalities, together with some observations upon the general treatment of our canine friends.

TitleBritish Dogs At Work
AuthorA. Croxton Smith
PublisherAdam And Charles Black
Year1906
Copyright1906, Adam And Charles Black
AmazonBritish Dogs at Work

With 20 Full-Page Illustrations In Colour By G. Vernon Stokes

British Dogs At WorkLondon Adam And Charles Black.
-To The Reader
The letterpress of this book makes no pretence of competing with the excellent works that are already in existence, its object being to afford some help and interest to the thousands who keep one or t...
-I. Man's First Friend
Mr. Kipling, in one of those happy phrases of his, has spoken of the dog as man's first friend, a phrase which correctly describes the relationship between the human and canine races. This is an idea ...
-The Pointer
Although battue shooting has thousands of votaries there are still many men to be found who love to shoot over dogs, realising more pleasure from seeing the work of a well-trained Pointer or Set...
-The Otterhound
The sport of otter-hunting dates back into the Middle Ages, and it is still pursued with vigour in these Islands. The pure-bred Otterhound is a noble specimen of the hound tribe, and it is somew...
-II. Kennels And Their Construction
First catch your hare, said the immortal Mrs. Glasse, who, after all, was not a lady but a certain Dr. John Hill. Very admirable advice, no doubt, to the cook, but not to the would-be dog-owner. Hav...
-The Beagle
Enthusiastic beaglers are numbered by their thousands, packs of Beagles being in evidence all over the kingdom, and large entries are on view at some of the leading shows at which a sporting jud...
-III. How To Buy A Dog
This is not such an easy matter as it sounds at the first blush, for I have known men and women spend many an anxious hour before they could make up their minds as to what breed they should keep. The ...
-The Deerhound
Here we have as handsome a dog as we need wish to see, his general appearance suggesting a rough-coated Greyhound of greater size and substance. Sir Walter Scott's description of the Scottish De...
-The Irish Wolfhound
We live in such a sceptical age that Goldsmith's statement about a Wolfhound reaching the stature of a yearling calf or standing 4 feet in height finds no credence. The worthy doctor's natural h...
-IV. Dog Feeding And Rearing
Supposing you have started by buying a puppy, if you would rear him well you must be prepared to go to some trouble in the matter. I once sold a couple of puppies for a comparatively small figure, who...
-IV. Dog Feeding And Rearing. Continued
The foregoing observations apply more directly to those who keep several puppies, with the idea of making them develop to the utmost advantage. The man who has but one, and that intended solely as a c...
-The English Setter
The Setter is of great antiquity, and in early days was used for hawking and netting. It is a moot point whether he has his origin in the Spaniel or whether he existed in this country before the...
-The Clumber Spaniel
Here we have, as far as looks and dignity are concerned, the king of the Spaniel race. He stands out distinctive and apart, as befits the ducal appellation which he bears, for is he not named after th...
-V. General Dog Management
First among the rules to be written large upon the walls of every kennel is: The strictest cleanliness must be observed. To the one-dog man this admonition need not be addressed, or, at any rate, it...
-The Sussex Spaniel
The original habitat of the Sussex Spaniel leaves no ground for conjecture, his name indicating sufficiently the locality whence he sprang. The end of the eighteenth century saw him established ...
-The Scottish Terrier
Stout-hearted, quaint of looks, and faithful to a degree, it is not surprising that the Scottish Terrier has won for himself a place in the hearts of all who know him. He is a tough little fello...
-VI. Hounds At Work
With a sport-loving nation such as ours it is not surprising to find dogs used extensively in all branches of field sport, although since driving, with a desire for heavy bags, became general, we find...
-VI. Hounds At Work. Part 2
The basset hound has been sufficiently long in this country to claim notice in a work devoted to British dogs. He is a grand little fellow, with the noblest of heads and the best of noses, while his n...
-VI. Hounds At Work. Part 3
A treatise pertaining to hawking, hunting, etc., published in 1496, gives a description of the greyhound which might almost stand to-day, and for this reason I make no apology for quoting it: - A g...
-The Foxhound
Peter Beckford, writing in 1779, complained of the paucity of literature upon fox-hunting. Since his classic work was given to the world, however, so much has been written that it is but repeati...
-The Basset Hound
For some inexplicable reason this charming little hound seems to be under a temporary eclipse. Why it should be so I do not venture to explain, as there is so much to be said in his favour. It i...
-The Bloodhound
History and legend have invested the Bloodhound with qualities that fill the popular imagination, giving him a reputation for a ferocity that is wholly alien to his nature. A kindlier-tempered a...
-VII. Shooting Dogs
There is nothing much more annoying than to have a badly broken dog in the field. He is a constant source of irritation, and is provocative of much vigorous language. All the storming in the world, ho...
-The Irish Setter
In Youatt's day the Irish Setter was evidently held in high esteem, as he tells us that a true one would obtain a higher price than either an English or Scottish Setter. In those days fifty guin...
-The Retriever
The one-dog sportsman will have to look far before he finds anything better for his purpose than a Retriever. Of the two varieties, the flat-coated and the curly, the latter demands little notic...
-The Cocker Spaniel
For a bright, lively little fellow, companionable to a degree, and ready for any work that he may be asked to do, the Cocker has no rival. Does not everybody who lives in the country know him, a...
-VIII. The Terriers
Any observations on British dogs at work would of necessity be incomplete without some reference to the various breeds of terriers, but there are so many excellent works upon this subject that but few...
-The Fox Terrier
The Fox Terrier is one of the common objects of country and town alike. Wherever we go, there is he to be found either in the wire-haired persuasion or the smooth. On the show bench the Bulldog ...
-The Airedale Terrier
In that good sporting county, Yorkshire, for many years a broken-haired, rough-and-ready terrier was much in vogue among the working-classes before he came to be classified as a variety under th...
-IX. The Science Of Dog Breeding
The breeding of pedigree stock of any description, whether it be guinea-pigs or racehorses, casts an irresistible spell over the minds of men, who are continually straining after an unattainable ideal...
-IX. The Science Of Dog Breeding. Continued
1. From the male parent is mainly derived the external structure, configuration, and outward characteristics; also the locomotive system or development. 2. From the female parent is derived the int...
-The Bulldog
Sturdy, thick-set, uncompromising in appearance, the Bulldog is supposed to represent our national characteristics. Certainly he has many admirable qualities, among which are to be numbered grea...
-The Collie
The Collie is a dog that is never likely to go out of fashion. Possibly he is not quite so popular to-day among the exhibiting fraternity as he was seven or eight years ago but his intelligence,...
-The Old English Sheepdog
One of my earliest recollections is of a shaggy, unkempt, cute-looking dog trudging along behind the drovers in charge of herds of cattle or flocks of sheep en route to one of the great cattle m...
-X. Some Common Dog Ailments
I am making no pretence of entering upon a learned disquisition on the many diseases to which canine flesh is heir, but I propose to set down a few observations upon the commonest ailments, and to ind...
-Distemper
As distemper is the commonest and most fatal disease from which dogs suffer, it will be as well to deal with that first, although it is not within the province of a layman to treat the subject exhaust...
-Pneumonia And Fits
The worst complications to be feared are pneumonia and fits, both of which are a source of great mortality. The beginning of pneumonia is not easily detected, but if you notice a rise in temperature y...









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