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The Dog And The Sportsman | by John Stuart Skinner



Embracing the uses, breeding, training, diseases, etc., etc., of dogs, and an account of the different kinds of game, with their habits. Also hints to shooters, with various useful recipes, etc., etc.

TitleThe Dog And The Sportsman
AuthorJohn Stuart Skinner
PublisherLea & Blanc Hard
Year1845
Copyright1845, Lea & Blanc Hard
AmazonThe Dog And The Sportsman

By J. S. Skinner, Former Editor Of The Turf Registee, Etc.

-Preface
The work here offered, contains, it is believed, the first separate and regular treatise which has been published in this country on the kindred subjects, the Dog, Game, and the Gun; a portion being d...
-Chapter I. Breeding, Feeding And Lodging
Recall the traveller, whose altered form Has borne the buffet of the mountain storm; And who will first his fond impatience meet? His faithful dog's already at his feet! Yes; though the porter spu...
-Food and Lodging
These contribute largely to future health and usefulness. Vegetable food should preponderate until an age is acquired when the dog is to take the field. After three months a small quantity of wellboil...
-Chapter II. The Pointer And Setter
See how the well-taught Setter leads the way, The scent grows warm; he stops; he springs the prey; The flattering coveys from the stubble rise, And on swift wing divide the sounding skies. The scatte...
-The Pointer And Setter. Continued
Always carry a whip, but never get in a passion ! Without a whip a great many faults are passed over that otherwise would have been corrected; and the dog, at last, becomes absolutely vicious. Some th...
-Chapter III. The Newfoundland And Chesapeake Bay Water-Dog
There is yet another dog, which, in these sketches,' brief and imperfect as they are, should not be overlooked, as his whole life is one of devotion to the will and pleasure of his master. We allude t...
-The Newfoundland And Chesapeake Bay Water-Dog. Continued
One of the most knowing dogs of this breed, belonging to a favourite servant, who being carpenter and duck-shooter for his master, Mr. Fielding Lewis, on James River, deserves to be mentioned, though ...
-Chapter IV. Fox-Hounds And Fox-Hunting
For my own part, I intend to hunt twice a week, during my stay with Sir Roger; and shall prescribe the moderate use of this exercise to all my country friends, as the best physic for mending a bad co...
-Chapter V. The Shepherd's Dog
The extension of sheep husbandry which is going on in the United States, and the importance of his services therein, bid fair to place the Shepherd's dog very soon in the front rank for real utility i...
-The Shepherd's Dog. Part 2
The Mastiff in Spain, where, in my opinion, its race has been most improved, is large, the fore and hind feet very strong, the hair short, and the head a little pointed* With an iron collar around hi...
-The Shepherd's Dog. Part 3
The peculiar education of these dogs is one of the most important and interesting steps pursued by the shepherd His method is to select from a multitude of pups a few of the healthiest and finest-loo...
-The Shepherd's Dog. Part 4
Many anecdotes could be related of the wonderful instinct of these dogs. I very much doubt if there are Shepherd dogs in any other part of the world except Spain, equal to those of New Mexico in valu...
-Chapter VI. The Terrier
Widely distributed and well known as this dog is, it would appear a strange omission to say nothing of him in a work intended for the use of all who have ownership or management of stables and horses,...
-Chapter VII. The Land Spaniel Or Springer
This docile and beautiful species of the canine family is rarely found of genuine blood in our country, and -where found, is kept more as a pet and parlour-companion for the lady, than as one of usefu...
-Pye
The interesting little dog now under consideration is a favourite in most countries; and has occasionally been much caressed by royalty itself. The chief order of Denmark, now called the order of the...
-Chapter VIII. Maxims For Sportsmen
Never let your dog have a will of his own; but impress upon him, from the first, that your command is to be the rule of his actions; and never allow him to ramble about the neighbourhood, alone, or at...
-Chapter IX. Habits Of Game Birds
Mr. Castor, of Philadelphia, one of the most accomplished sportsmen on paper, or in the field which it has been our good luck to know, makes the following observations. As before premised, the read...
-Chapter X. Habits Of Partridges - Good Shooting, Etc
To the sportsman, I think nothing ought to be more interesting, and certainly nothing is more necessary, than a knowledge of the natural history and habits of the animal which he hunts. Of these, th...
-Chapter XI. American Hare - (Lepus Americanus)
Which is very commonly, but very improperly called rabbit Indeed the hare and rabbit so much resemble each other, that we do not wonder that mere empirical observers should have been puzzled in assign...
-Chapter XII. The Squirrel
The individuals belonging to the animal family of which we shall presently proceed to describe one species, are remarkable for the liveliness of their disposition, the quickness of their motions, and ...
-Chapter XIII. Hints To Shooters
As I do not profess to teach the art of gun-making, it will suffice to recommend all, when intending to purchase a gun, to go to some respectable maker, and, after having described the calibre, weight...
-Chapter XIV. Proportions Of Powder And Shot
The quantity of powder and shot which constitutes the correct load or charge for the fowling-piece, is a circumstance which ought to be duly impressed on the mind of every shooter, and to which, I am ...
-Chapter XV. Toling For Ducks
More than forty years ago, this curious mode of getting ducks is said to have had its commencement, near Havre de Grace, Maryland. Tradition says the discovery was made by a sportsman, who, patiently...
-Chapter XVI. Form Of A Sportsman's Journal
Where killed. When. Partridge. Pheasant, Woodcock. Snipe. Ducks or wild fowl. Hare. Total each day. Shots missed. Remarks. Mond...
-Chapter XVII. The Fox (C. Vulpes)
The interest connected frith the animal whose natural history we are now about to sketch, is of a very different order from that which we have discovered in the the horse and the dog. The fox is not t...
-Chapter XVIII. Ruffed Grouse, Or Pheasant
This is the bird called partridge in the Eastern States, and pheasant in the middle, southern, and western- It is a beautiful bird, nearly as heavy as the pinnated grouse, and is found, in more or les...
-Chapter XIX. The Quail Or Partridge
This interesting game-bird is found all over our country, and in Canada and Nova Scotia. It is said to be migratory, and that it passes in winter from the Northern and Eastern States, and the cold reg...
-Interesting Particular In The Natural History Of The Quail
On the power given to the quail of withholding that peculiar odour which betrays it to the dog. Wilmington, Del, Oct. 14,1829. Mr. Editor, A close scrutiny of every subject in natural history-discl...
-Chapter XX. Woodcock (Scolopax Minor)
This bird is well known to all our sportsmen. It usually begins to lay its eggs in April, but nests with eggs are frequently found in February and March, as far north as Pennsylvania. Its nest is made...
-Chapter XXI. Grouse-Shooting
Philadelphia, January 23d, 1830. Mr. Editor, I have perused the numbers of your Sporting Magazine as they have appeared, without finding any thing in them relative to grouse-shooting. As I have been...
-Chapter XXII. The Snipe (Scolopax Gallinago.)
This is the bird commonly called the English snipe, and also frequently the Jack snipe. It has a very strong resemblance to the common snipe of Great Britain, to which circumstance it is probably inde...
-The Diseases Of Dogs
In treating of the diseases of these animals, the companions and friends of man, the same order will be adopted that has been pursued in the pathology of the horse. Of inflammation generally, it is u...
-Chapter XXIII. Compression Of The Brain
This singular disease is thus characterized: - The dog is continually running round and round; and where he has liberty to do so he will continue this action almost from morning until night He perform...
-Rabies - Madness
This dreadful disease is comparatively fare in the horse, and when it does appear, it is usually propagated to him from the dog. Rabies is said to be produced by improper food, by want of water, by h...
-Chapter XXIV. Diseases Of The Ears
These may be divided into such as affect the external and the internal parts of the ear. Among those of the flap of the ear are, eruption around the edge of the ear. A scurfy roughness spreads around...
-Canker On The Edge Of The Ear
The pointer is always a fidgety, impatient dog; and if there is any thing about the face, or any little heat in the ear to annoy him, he will shake his head and flap and beat his ears without mercy. I...
-Effusion Beneath The Skin Of The Ear
This is a frequent consequence of the flapping and beating of the ears. A swelling will, be observed on the inside of the flap, and extending sometimes from the tip to the base of the ear. It evidentl...
-Canker Within The Ear
This is the most serious affection of the ears of dogs. The first symptom is shaking of the head, and perhaps carrying it a little on one side, and scratching with greater or less violence about the e...
-Chapter XXV. The Diseases Of The Eyes
The first of these belongs to the eyelid, although generally accompanied by some inflammation of the eye itself. Ulceration Of The Eyelid When a dog has much mangy affection about him, it attacks va...
-Enlargement Of The Third Eyelid
The quadruped not having hands to ward off some dangers which threaten him, and to which the eyes are particularly exposed, nature has given him a movable membrane, situated within the inner corner of...
-Weeping From The Eye
This is the usual accompaniment of inflammation, and will abate when the inflammation subsides; or, should it continue, and especially should a mucous discharge be established, the following wash will...
-Fistula Lacrymalis
There is a canal below the inner corner of the eye through which the superfluous tears flow into the cavity of the nose. When the tears are secreted too rapidly to be thus carried away, they run down ...
-Inflammation Of The Eye
The dog is frequently subject to pure inflammation of the eyes. He seeks the darkest places - he is continually closing his eyes when brought into the light. The conjunctiva] membrane, whether coverin...
-Cataract
This is one of the terminations of inflammation of the eye. It is opacity sometimes of the membrane covering the crystalline lens, but much oftener of the lens itself. The dog is peculiarly subject to...
-Dropsy Of The Eye
In consequence of inflammation, the eyeball will sometimes become more than double its natural size. It will be cloudy, the different parts of it confused, and the sight gone. Nothing should be attemp...
-Protrusion Of The Eye
This occasionally happens from the bite of a larger dog. The eye is forced out of the socket, and the lid contracts around it, and prevents its return. If the accident has not occurred more than a few...
-Extirpation Of The Eye
In the present case this is a very easy thing to accomplish. The assistant should press down the lid as much as possible around the eye, and the operator, taking the eye in his left hand, and pulling ...
-Films In The Eye
Bathe the affected part twice a day with wafer in which a little vitriol has been dissolved, (the size of a large horse-bean to a pint of spring water,) and, in a minute or two, wash it in clear water...
-Chapter XXVI. The Tongue
There is the same vesicular inflammation of the tongue in the dog which has been described (page 67) as found in the horse. The dog will not eat, he will not or cannot open his mouth, and he resists t...
-Chapter XXVII. The Teeth
The full-grown dog has twenty teeth in the upper jaw, and twenty-two in the lower one. The central front teeth and the tushes pierce the gums before, or very shortly after, the birth, and the others p...
-Chapter XXVIII. Inflammation Of The Membrane Of The Nose
There are two affections of the membrane of the nose that deserve mention. The first is a peculiar violent spasmodic snorting noise, made with the head extended, and the nose protruded and pointing a ...
-Chapter XXIX. Inflammation of The Glands, And of The Cellular Substance Beneath The Throat
Phlegmonous Swelling Of The Throat. Recipe (No. 15) Take - Barbadoes aloes, powdered, eight ounces; Myrrh, powdered, one ouoce; Proof spirit, two quarts; Water, one quart: Let them infuse for three w...
-Enlargement Of The Thyroid Glands - Bronchocele
The throat of the dog exhibits yet another kind of tumour. On either side of the windpipe, sometimes high up in the neck, at others almost as low as the chest, will be felt an oval, movable, hard tumo...
-Schirrous Tumours Of The Teats
There are other tumours which cannot, perhaps, be any where more conveniently considered than here, viz., enlargement of the teats, or hard schirrous tumours in them or near them. When the milk of a ...
-Cancerous Ulceus
The time will come when the wound will no longer heal. It will have assumed a new character; it will have become a malignant cancerous ulcer, the source, no doubt, of great pain to the animal, wearing...
-Cancer In The Vagins
Cancer occasionally attacks the vagina of the bitch. It is the consequence of injury and ulceration of the membrane lining that passage; either from being suddenly forced from the dog; or from difficu...
-Adipose Tumours About The Teats
It is not every tumour of the teats that becomes schirrous or cancerous. Some of them seem to be composed of mere masses of fat that have been separated from the neighbouring substance. These are term...
-Warts
Dogs are often subject to warts. They appear scattered on various parts of the skin, either of a simple form, or with spreading, fungous-like heads. If a strong solution of the nitrate of silver is ap...
-Chapter XXX. Cough - Asthma
The dog is as subject to catarrh and cold as other animals: but there is a singular difference in the sound and character of the cough of dogs under different circumstances, and indicative of differen...
-Chapter XXXI. Distemper
Turn is the most fatal disease to. which the dog is subject, and it is one which he seems doomed to undergo at least once in his life. An attack of it is indicated by a gradual loss of appetite, and s...
-Distemper. Continued
Recipe (No. 24). Strong Liquid Blister Take - Powdered Alkanet root, two ounces; Spirit of turpentine, a gallon. Pour the turpentine on the alkanet root, and let it macerate three days, frequently s...
-Chapter XXXII. Fits - Locked Jaw - Palsy
No animal is so subject to fits as the dog; and next to distemper, they destroy a greater number of dogs than any other disease. A puppy cutting or changing his teeth is very subject to fits; and the ...
-Chapter XXXIII. Inflammation Of The Lungs
The existence of this, disease is easily recognised. There is not only the cessation of the cough, the heaving, the heat of the mouth, and the coldness of the feet, which characterize the same malady ...
-Chapter XXXIV. Poisons - Worms
Few animals are so exposed to the vengeance of some miscreant, or so much in the way of accidental poisoning, as the dog. The poisons usually given, or picked up by chance, are arsenic, corrosive subl...
-Chapter XXXV. Colic - Inflammation Of The Bowels - Diarrhcea - Protrusion Of The Rectum - Piles
There is a species of spasmodic colic with which puppies are often attacked. The little animals are uneasy and fidgety, shifting their posture and place, hiding themselves in corners, looking at their...
-Chapter XXXVI. Diseases Of The Generative Organs
The glans of the penis of the dog, and especially of the young dog, sometimes enlarges, and the prepuce contracts beneath it, and can no longer be brought over and made to cover it The glans becomes o...
-Chapter XXXVII. Parturition
The bitch goes with young nine weeks. She rarely varies even one day. It is seldom before the fifth week that the belly begins to enlarge, or that the motions of the foetus can be detected. A day or t...
-Chapter XXXVIII. Diseases Of The Skin
There is scarcely a keeper, or a whipper-in, who has not an infallible specific for the mange; and one or two applications are to perform a complete cure. I know nothing of these wonderful ointments, ...
-Chapter XXXIX. Strains
Sprains are painful swellings of the ligaments and tendons of the joints; and are caused by too great ex tensions of the limb*, of which the tendons become relaxed. They should be well rubbed with the...









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previous page: The Diseases Of Dogs, And Their Homeopathic Treatment | by James Moore
  
page up: Dog Books
  
next page: A History And Description Of The Modern Dogs Of Great Britain And Ireland. (Sporting Division) | Rawdon Briggs Lee