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A History And Description Of The Modern Dogs Of Great Britain And Ireland. (Non-Sporting Division) | by Rawdon Briggs Lee



The publication and success of my book last year on "Sporting Dogs" has necessitated the production of another division dealing with the "NON-Sporting" varieties, in which terriers are not included, they forming a volume of themselves. I have endeavoured to give a somewhat complete early history of the different breeds, and, at the same time, have brought the subject up to date. As before, the drawings, although in most instances taken from living examples, are not intended to be merely counterparts of dogs of the day, but they must be taken as illustrative of the typical specimens they represent. I believe this departure from ordinary custom to be a useful one, as the portraits of individual dogs, whose prominence before the public is more or less ephemeral, cannot in the future be of so much interest as pictures of idealised animals are likely to be

TitleA History And Description Of The Modern Dogs Of Great Britain And Ireland. (Non-Sporting Division)
AuthorRawdon Briggs Lee
PublisherHorace Cox
Year1894
Copyright1894, Horace Cox
AmazonA History And Description Of The Modern Dogs Of Great Britain And Ireland, Non-Sporting Division
The Modern Dogs Of Great Britain And Ireland.Rawdon B. Lee.

By Rawdon B. Lee, Kennel Editor Of "The Field," Author Of The Histories Of "The Fox Terrier," "The Collie," Etc.

The Illustrations by Arthur Wardle And R. H. Moore.

-Preface
The publication and success of my book last year on Sporting Dogs has necessitated the production of another division dealing with the NON-Sporting varieties, in which terriers are not included, t...
-Chapter I. The Mastiff
Quite recently a somewhat interesting correspondence has taken place in the Field regarding what some contributors called the deterioration of the mastiff, implying by these words that the old Engli...
-The Mastiff. Part 2
By the Romans and some others he was abased by the purposes to which he was put, for I do not believe he was ever intended as a hunting dog, or for the purpose of fighting with much more powerful beas...
-The Mastiff. Part 3
Without distinctive feature, there was one dark fawn dog, others light fawn with black muzzles, and an animal that had been obtained to improve the strain that would have been best relegated to the ta...
-The Mastiff. Part 4
There was nothing striking about her. She was old, her shoulders a trifle flat, and she had a grey muzzle, but withal stood 29m. at the shoulder, had a broad round head, good loin, and deep, lengthy f...
-The Mastiff. Part 5
The above opinion of Colonel Garnier's, written, say, a quarter of a century ago, will scarcely find favour now. There is not the slightest similarity between the smooth St. Bernard and the mastiff, a...
-The Mastiff. Part 6
There can be little doubt that with the advent of Crown Prince came a new era in the history of the mastiff. In him we had a dog of a very striking personality, not by any means confined to his pecul...
-The Mastiff. Part 7
The actual length of the face is of very small importance in comparison with its strength, i.e., breadth, depth and bluntness, and it is in respect of this strength present-day breeders assert that t...
-The Mastiff. Part 8
The following are the descriptions drawn up by the Mastiff Club, and alluded to earlier on. General Charader And Symmetry (Value 10) Large, massive, powerful, symmetrical and well-knit frame. A ...
-Chapter II. The St. Bernard
No dog ever appealed more to the kindly instincts of humanity than the St. Bernard. Not his rich chesnut or tawny colour with dark facings and white collar and blaze, nor his kindly benevolent counten...
-The St. Bernard. Part 2
No doubt some of the villagers who did business with the monks were dog lovers, and would now and then beg or purchase a puppy, and from youngsters so obtained, and trained to draw light handy carts, ...
-The St. Bernard. Part 3
Without much interlude we are brought right up to the institution of the St. Bernard Club in 1882, when the variety obtained another fillip, and two years later the Rev. Arthur Carter introduced his i...
-The St. Bernard. Part 4
Whilst alluding to big dogs, mention may be made of Mr. Shillcock's Lord Bute, said to be the one giant of his breed. He might stand a quarter of an inch higher than Plinlimmon, but he was not nearly ...
-The St. Bernard. Part 5
From the first the rough-coated St. Bernard has been the more popular in England, notwithstanding that it is looked upon more or less as a mongrel in Switzerland; but it must be remembered that here ...
-The St. Bernard. Part 6
Some of the most notable Swiss breeders, when speaking of their best specimens, appear proud of boasting of the humble origin of their favourites, and one of them remarked to me, 'Ah! I picked the si...
-The St. Bernard. Part 7
I was happily successful in bringing back the photograph of this dog, also of another, a dog that had been sold by the monks for about £130 in English money. The St. Bernards are still used in winter...
-The St. Bernard. Part 8
A good many St. Bernards are to be seen in Lucerne and neighbourhood, some of them quite fair, but, as a rule, they are a poor, narrow-muzzled lot. After a short stay at Lucerne I went to Lauter-brun...
-The St. Bernard. Part 9
The following is the English Club's description of the St. Bernard: Head Large and massive, circumference of skull being more than double the length of the head from nose to occiput. From stop t...
-Chapter III. The Newfoundland
Until the St. Bernard became popular in this country the black and white Newfoundland dog appeared to hold the admiration of the public. He had been a hero in his own line, and the travellers' tales ...
-The Newfoundland. Part 2
A contributor, writing to the Field in 1869, and he wrote with authority, said with regard to this tinge: The black dogs, especially when young, often appear to have a brown tinge in their coats. It ...
-The Newfoundland. Part 3
Mr. T. W. Wildman, of Bingley, about this period gave considerable attention to the exhibition of Newfoundlands, and possessed admirable specimens in such animals as Lion, Mayor of Bingley, and Black ...
-The Newfoundland. Part 4
The fore legs should be straight, well lined with muscle, to give them a round, powerful appearance, ending with good, large, well closed feet, standing on them like a terrier. The chest above must b...
-The Newfoundland. Part 5
Perhaps the variety of Newfoundland dog best known to the general public is that black and white in colour, once distinguished as the Landseer Newfoundland, out of honour to the great animal painter o...
-Chapter IV. The Collie Or Sheep Dog
Although the Scotch collie dog, as he is so often called, has for many generations been one of the favourite varieties of the canine race, his fondest admirers of fifty years ago could scarcely have...
-The Collie Or Sheep Dog. Part 2
Of the collie at the early part of this century, the Rev. W. Bingley, in his British Quadrupeds, gives us an animal almost identical in type with what we have now. The illustration in the Sportsman...
-The Collie Or Sheep Dog. Part 3
The first dog show that contained a class for sheep dogs was that at Birmingham in 1860, when the late Mr. W. Lort and the late Mr. J. H. Walsh (Stonehenge) awarded the prize, which they gave to a ...
-The Collie Or Sheep Dog. Part 4
Whilst alluding to the prices of collies, I may say that the dogs have usually brought most money, still, sundry bitches have been sold for £200 apiece and more. Some of the best of this sex of late h...
-The Collie Or Sheep Dog. Part 5
It must not, however, be taken for granted that the collie as he is now seen, obtaining valuable prizes at our kennel exhibitions, is the exact counterpart of the dog met with on the sheep farms, and ...
-The Collie Or Sheep Dog. Part 6
As to the sheep: These ought to be either of the Welsh breed, the black or of some grey-faced Scotch variety, or Herdwicks, taken from various flocks. Each dog drives three different sheep, two being...
-The Collie Or Sheep Dog. Part 7
The English Club's Standard The skull of the collie should be quite flat and rather broad, with fine tapering muzzle of fair length and mouth the least bit overshot, the eyes widely apart, almond s...
-Chapter V. The Smooth-Coated Sheep Dog
This variety of the collie has mostly been produced in the north of England. Being less cumbersome in formation than the dog previously written about, it is better adapted for work on many of the hill...
-Chapter VI. The Old English (Bob-Tailed) Sheep Dog
Of late years there has been a strong attempt to re-popularise this quaint and representative creature, a dog that always reminds me of one of our shaggy ancient British forefathers we see in picture ...
-The Old English (Bob-Tailed) Sheep Dog. Part 2
With regard to the sagacity of this breed I consider it has few equals, and certainly no superior. In a large dairy farm I know of, there is a dog which will fetch up individual cows as they are requ...
-The Old English (Bob-Tailed) Sheep Dog. Part 3
One other interesting fact remains to be told with regard to the way Dr. Ker hit off the pigeon-blue colour. He had been breeding blue grizzle with blue grizzle for several years, hoping to produce th...
-Chapter VII. The Poodle
There used to be an impression abroad that there were two varieties of poodle, the Russian poodle and the French poodle; but the error, however it arose, is now corrected, and we know that the black a...
-The Poodle Varieties. Part 2
Der Mittlere Pudel Der Mittlere Pudel, or medium-sized poodle, is only a variety of the great poodle. He has the same qualities and properties. Size is the only difference between them; he is somet...
-The Poodle. Part 3
Much more could be written about the poodle as a sporting dog, but as one of the Modern Dogs of Great Britain he is used only as a pet and companion, purely a fancy dog and as a performer on the stage...
-The Poodle. Part 4
The writer of Stonehenge's article lamented the fact that so few poodles were kept in this country at that time, although they had long been fairly established as a British dog. The Kennel Club Stud...
-The Poodle. Part 5
I have already alluded to the fashion that obtains of clipping and shaving the poodle according to the ideas prevailing at the time, indeed, a well regulated and fashionably dressed poodle requires ab...
-The Poodle. Part 6
Thus carefully have I entered into the management and keeping of the poodle as a house dog, because it is only used as such in this country, and because it is the dog above all others that, through ne...
-The Poodle. Part 7
The truffle is in season in England from November until March, but it can be purchased in most shops where such things are sold, all the year round. As we have said, the occupation of truffle-hunting ...
-Chapter VIII. The Dalmatian
SOME early writers have told us that this dog was used in Denmark to draw carts and other conveyances utilised by the thrifty Dane and his wife to take their commodities from place to place. Perhaps h...
-The Dalmatian. Part 2
In the club standard such is not alluded to, and I do not believe any judge who found a perfectly marked Dalmatian with this light-coloured eye would disqualify or even severely handicap him on its ac...
-The Dalmatian. Part 3
The following is the description of the Dalmatian adopted by the club. It will be noticed that thirty points are allowed for colour and markings; still, if a dog were pretty well patched black and whi...
-Chapter IX. The Bulldog
Time is known to play grim jokes with historical monuments, but it probably has never burlesqued anything more than it has our national emblem, the British bulldog. Evolved for a specific purpo...
-The Bulldog. Part 2
So much for the activity and working capacity of a bulldog that has been pronounced by some parties to be one of the best of his race ever exhibited. However, all bulldogs are not so unable to walk at...
-The Bulldog. Part 3
In the good old days, about Sheffield and Birmingham, dishonest practices were in force, which were said to improve the face and muzzle of the bulldog. Cruel contrivances called jacks were fixed o...
-The Bulldog. Part 4
About the same period - a little later and a little earlier perhaps - that Mr. Adcock was proving unsuccessful in producing bulldogs as big and active as he desired, others were working away on a some...
-The Bulldog. Part 5
He says: I at one time had an English bulldog who accompanied me constantly in deer stalking. He learned to crouch and creep up to the deer with me, never showing himself, and seemingly to understand...
-The Bulldog. Part 6
The head is one of the important characteristics of the variety; its appearance should be one of striking massiveness in proportion to the animal's size as well as compared with that of any other ani...
-The Bulldog. Part 7
There is only one style of ear admitted by judges as being correct nowadays, and that is the shape known as 'rose,' which, by the way it is folded, laps in an outward direction, exposing some part of...
-The Bulldog. Part 8
The elbows should be set on low, turned outwards, standing well away from the ribs, so as to permit the body to swing between them, and giving the legs the appearance of being loosely tacked on the s...
-The Bulldog. Part 9
Following the precedent I have formed in other chapters, I give the description the leading specialist club (the Bulldog Club) have issued of their special variety: In forming a judgment on any sp...
-Chapter X. The Pug
Notwithstanding what some writers have said to the contrary, I believe that little change has been made in the appearance and in the points of the pug during the past forty years. Twenty years ago ...
-The Pug. Part 2
About the time Hogarth, the great painter, flourished, Dutch pugs were as fashionable as black pages, and no lady of title was considered to be fully equipped unless she had both in her following. Alt...
-The Pug. Part 3
I think a pretty good idea of what a pug should be, is given in the drawing by Mr. Wardle which precedes this chapter. As a companion in the house, and for an occasional run into the country, no dog i...
-Chapter XI. The Black Pug
Here is a new variety, which has certainly appeared and obtained identity as such within the past two or three years, although we must go back a little further for the time when a few specimens were o...
-The Black Pug. Continued
After Lady Brassey's tragical death in the Southern seas in 1887, several of her black pugs were purchased by Mr. A. Bond, already alluded to. One of these dogs was Jack Spratt, who is said to be pret...
-Chapter XII. English Toy Spaniels
Notwithstanding recent introductions and popularisations of other canine pets, the toy spaniels appear to well hold their own in favouritism; one even fancies they are increasing in numbers, as they c...
-English Toy Spaniels. Part 2
The above extracts are particularly interesting, as they give a clue to the early inter-breeding of two breeds from which we now obtain two other varieties, and the reference to the early establishmen...
-English Toy Spaniels. Part 3
As all these English toy spaniels are made so much on the same lines, and, in a certain degree, inter-bred with each other, it is not my intention to separate them under different heads any more than ...
-English Toy Spaniels. Part 4
Retracing our steps a few years, we find in 1871 Mr. C. Dawson's Frisky, Mrs. Lee's Jumbo, and Mr. Garwood's Hyllus, all animals of high stamp, and three years later Mr. Forder brought out a King Char...
-English Toy Spaniels. Part 5
The following are the descriptions and points of the four English varieties as drawn up by the specialist club: Points Of Toy Spaniels (English). Head Should be well domed, and in good specimens...
-Chapter XIII. The Japanese Spaniel
In some quarters an impression prevails that the Japanese spaniel is quite a modern introduction. This is, however, not so; and at one of our very earliest dog shows - that held in the Holborn Horse R...
-The Japanese Spaniel. Continued
One cannot dictate exact weights in any breed, but my own belief is that Japanese spaniels are best all round at about 81b., and that if you breed them much under this weight you sacrifice both stren...
-Chapter XIV. The Maltese
Sometimes this charming little dog is called a terrier, on other occasions a spaniel, whilst in many quarters it has been known as the Lion dog of Malta. Sir Edwin Landseer painted it as the latter ab...
-The Maltese. Continued
Here is another choice little bit for our modern dog fanciers, for old writers say that when the Maltese puppies were born it was the custom to twist the rostrum (the upper nose) with the fingers i...
-Chapter XV. The Pomeranian. Spitz Dog, Loup-Loup, Wolf Dog, Fox Dog
This dog has from time to time been known and recognised under many different names, as the Spitz, Loup-Loup, Pomeranian, Wolf dog, Fox dog, and may be by others. There is little doubt that he more ne...
-The Pomeranian. Spitz Dog, Loup-Loup, Wolf Dog, Fox Dog. Continued
That these comparatively new varieties, at any rate new to this country, have a future before them I do not doubt at all; they are in enthusiastic hands and a specialist club has been formed to look a...
-Chapter XVI. The Italian Greyhound
This graceful and fragile little creature, with the equally choice Maltese dog, may not survive long in this country. He has never been a particularly great favourite, owing doubtless to his delicate ...
-The Italian Greyhound. Continued
In a conversation with Miss Mackenzie, I learned that there are, at the time I write, some dozen or so Italian greyhounds in her kennels, and all are strong and hardy, full of life and play, are never...
-Chapter XVII. The Schipperke
Here is a quaint Dutch little dog which since its introduction into this country, about four years ago, has become one of ourselves, and I fancy will now stay with us and develop into one of our Briti...
-Chapter XVIII. The Chow-Chow
PERHAPS I may be taken to task for introducing the above Chinese dog in a book purporting to deal with British modern varieties. However, the Chow-chow is now so common amongst us, he has classes spec...
-Works Published By Horace Cox
The Cattle Of Great Britain Being a Series of Articles on the Various Breeds of Cattle of the United Kingdom, their History, Management, etc. Edited by the late J. Coleman, Editor of the Farm Depar...
-Yacht Architecture
By Dixon Kemp, Associate of the Institute of Naval Architects and Member of the Council. This work enters into the whole subject of the laws which govern the resistance of bodies moving in water, and ...
-A Manual Of Yacht And Boat Sailing
By Dixon Kemp, Associate of the Institute of Naval Architects and Member of the Council, Author of Yacht Designing and Yacht Architecture. This edition has been largely re-written, and contains a ...
-British And Irish Salmonidę
By Francis Day, CLE., F.L.S., and F.Z.S. This work is an exhaustive treatise on the Salmonidę of the British Islands, and will be found equally valuable to the Angler, the Fish Culturist, and the Scie...
-Essays On Sport And Natural History
By J. E. HARTING. 8vo., pp. 463, with thirty-two illustrations, price Ios. 6d., by post us. Contents Shooting-; Hawking-; Fishing; Training Hawks; Lark Mirrors; Plover Catching; Fishing with Cor...
-The Collie Or Sheepdog
A History and Description of the Collie or Sheepdog, in his British Varieties. By Rawdon B. Lee, Kennel Editor of the Field, and Author of The Fox Terrier. Demy 8vo., printed on plate paper, with ...
-The Dogs Of The British Islands
Being a Series of Articles on the Points of their Various Breeds ; and the Treatment of the Diseases to which they are Subject. By the late J. H. WALSH, Stone-henge, Editor of the Field (with the ...
-The Modern Sportsman's Gun And Rifle
Including Game and Wildfowl Guns, Sporting and Match Rifles, and Revolvers. In Two Volumes : Vol. I., Game and Wildfowl Guns; Vol. II., The Rifle and Revolver. By the late J. H. Walsh, Stonehenge, E...









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previous page: A History And Description Of The Modern Dogs Of Great Britain And Ireland. (Sporting Division) | Rawdon Briggs Lee
  
page up: Dog Books
  
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