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The Terriers. A History And Description Of The Modern Dogs Of Great Britain And Ireland | by Rawdon B. Lee



In describing the Terriers in all their varieties, I have endeavoured to give particulars as to their working qualifications and their general character, as well as their so-called "show points;" and my desire to prevent a useful race of dog from degenerating into a ladies' pet and a pampered creature, only able to earn his owner gold on the show bench, is my reason for treating so fully of him as he is concerned in that sphere which Nature intended him to occupy.

TitleThe Terriers. A History And Description Of The Modern Dogs Of Great Britain And Ireland
AuthorRawdon B. Lee
PublisherHorace Cox
Year1894
Copyright1894, Horace Cox
AmazonA History and Description of the Modern Dogs of Great Britain and Ireland: The Terriers

By Rawdon B. Lee, Kennel Editor Of "The Field," Author Of The Histories Of "The Fox Terrier," "The Collie," Etc.

The Illustrations By Arthur Wardle And R. H. Moore.

-Preface
This, I believe, is the first occasion upon which a volume has been published dealing entirely with the Terriers. Of late years these little dogs have come very much to the front, and, if no new varie...
-Chapter I. The Terriers
Many of the varieties of the terrier we possess at the present time, and which as a group are doubtless the most popular of the canine race, are of quite modern origin, although no doubt there was a d...
-The Terriers. Part 2
Blome's description may, however, be interesting to the curious, so here it is. The terrier is a very small dog, used for hunting the fox and the badger, his business being to go into the earths and ...
-The Terriers. Part 3
Some old pictures of terriers dating back 300 years illustrate cross-bred looking creatures, some of them bearing more or less the distinctive characteristic of the turnspit. Others show a considerabl...
-The Terriers. Part 4
Since Stonehenge's Dogs of the British Isles was first published in 1867, which included the same varieties he had given eight years earlier in his Rural Sports, great strides have been made in...
-Chapter II. The Bull Terrier
Our modern bull terrier is a very different creature from what he was half a century ago, and I know there are some old dog fanciers who prefer the brindled and white and fawn or fallow smut dogs, t...
-The Bull Terrier. Part 2
Poor Sam ! I even now think of him with regret. We had to part, and he was sent to Manchester to do duty as guard in a warehouse and shop. But the smoky Cottonopolis he did not like, nor the confineme...
-The Bull Terrier. Part 3
The Madmans, Pusses, Victors, and Rebels were for the most part large dogs, and for general excellence would compare most favourably with the best specimens seen to-day. I remember some of the...
-The Bull Terrier. Part 4
Following the death of James Hinks, of Birmingham, his two sons continued to show their partiality for their father's favourite dogs, and from their kennels many of the modern prize winners have come....
-The Bull Terrier. Part 5
It was always to be much regretted that Mr. Shirley did not endeavour, more than actually was the case, to continue the variety; and had he done so there is no reason to doubt that the Ettington Park ...
-The Bull Terrier. Part 6
Of course, a dog, even with such an amount of popularity as the bull terrier, could not go long without a club being formed for its improvement, and this came to pass in 1887. The following is a descr...
-Chapter III. The English White Terrier
On several occasions I have quoted the number of entries in the Kennel Club Stud Book as indicative of the rise or fall in popularity of the different varieties of dogs to which they allude. These f...
-The English White Terrier. Part 2
Another very good dog about this period was Mr. W. Duggan's (Birmingham) Spider, who won first prize at Birmingham four years in succession, and I am inclined to think that Spider came a good second t...
-The English White Terrier. Part 3
With all of which I cordially agree, and in this age we must be content with the survival of the fittest. It is only to be expected that in the common course of events, when we are introducing new v...
-Chapter IV. The Black And Tan Terrier
I IMAGINE that were one of our great-grandfathers to be shown a specimen of the modern black and tan terrier he would be unable to recognise it as the same variety of dog that, when he was a boy, ran ...
-The Black And Tan Terrier. Part 2
There is no doubt that when dog shows were first instituted the black and tan terrier was a much commoner animal than he is now; at any rate, the classes for him were much better filled then than is t...
-The Black And Tan Terrier. Part 3
These dark or black markings on the brown feet of black and tan dogs of all varieties are more or less common, and are found defined to a certain extent on collies of that colour, and on black and tan...
-The Black And Tan Terrier. Part 4
Owing to the variety of surroundings that I have named, the black and tan terrier is scarcely a dog that can be recommended for the household. Whether there is anything particularly attractive for the...
-Chapter V. The Fox Terrier
The popularity of the fox terrier is undoubted. He is seen running at large in the streets of our cities and towns; in country places he abounds; and go where you will half a dozen fox terriers are to...
-The Fox Terrier. Part 2
The Sportsman's Cabinet, published in two volumes in 1803-4, two years after the first volume of Daniel's Rural Sports appeared, contains an engraving by Scott from a spirited painting by Reinagle...
-The Fox Terrier. Part 3
An excessive size of the aural appendages is not an attribute of the terrier proper, any more than are the hound markings. I am inclined to believe that if ever there was an original terrier he had se...
-The Fox Terrier. Part 4
At this period there was an opening for a popular dog; the fox terrier availed himself of the opportunity, the public gladly accepted his enterprise in so doing, and his progress from the stable and t...
-The Fox Terrier. Part 5
There had been favoured strains of fox terriers kept at many of the hound kennels; Mr. Slingsby, at Scriven Park, Yorkshire, had them, so had Mr. Donville Poole, Marbury Hall, Shropshire; Sir Watkin W...
-The Fox Terrier. Part 6
Mr. Tinne was first asked what he would take for his brace of bitches, and replied, 500. Mr. Stephens offered four. Mr. Tinne then altered his mind, and withdrew Kate Cole, but said he would part wi...
-The Fox Terrier. Part 7
Mr. F. Redmond, St. John's Wood, has been particularly successful up to date with his terriers, and D'Orsay, already alluded to, must have proved quite a little gold mine to his owner. Mr. L. P. C. As...
-The Fox Terrier. Part 8
The following are the description and scale of points drawn up by the Fox Terrier Club, which was established in 1876, and there are several other minor clubs which adopt the same. Description H...
-Chapter VI. The Wire-Haired Fox Terrier
Much contained in the preceding chapter is applicable to the wire-haired fox terrier, for in colour, make, and shape, the two ought to be identical, though the one has a smooth close coat, the other a...
-The Wire-Haired Fox Terrier. Part 2
I was introduced to another particularly game wire-haired terrier a couple of years ago, whilst on a visit to a friend at Watford. This dog, Jack (Powderham Jack in the Stud Books), running about the ...
-The Wire-Haired Fox Terrier. Part 3
This Venture was as good a terrier of his variety as I ever saw, without the slightest particle of bulldog appearance, built on proper lines, with a coat above the average in hardness and denseness, a...
-The Wire-Haired Fox Terrier. Part 4
Following the above came that good bitch, Bramble, of Mr. G. F. Richardson's, size being her only fault (she was 2olb. weight), which was the common one about this period, as Balance, another first-cl...
-The Wire-Haired Fox Terrier. Part 5
The club's points and description are as follows: The wire-haired fox terrier should resemble the smooth sort in every respect except the coat, which should be broken. The harder and more wiry the...
-Chapter VII. The Airedale Terrier
Here we have the largest variety of the terrier admirers of the dog have yet produced, and big though he may be, our best specimens are now thoroughly terrier-like in type, and perfectly free from any...
-The Airedale Terrier. Part 2
However, perhaps what Mr. E. Bairstow, of Bradford, has written about the Airedale terrier in The Dog Owner's Annual, and which has been revised for publication here, will be of interest, he being o...
-The Airedale Terrier. Part 3
It would perhaps be as well to mention here, that when Airedale terriers proper are born they resemble the smooth black and tan terrier in coat and colour, having a black, glossy, smooth coat, and ta...
-Chapter VIII. The Bedlington Terrier
It is little more than a quarter of a century since public attention was first attracted to the Bedlington terrier, which originally I take to have been at any rate second cousin to the Dandie Dinmont...
-The Bedlington Terrier. Part 2
In 1869 the following interesting and valuable history of this breed appeared in the Field, and has been copied since without proper acknowledgement: Owing to the interest lately evinced in the Be...
-The Bedlington Terrier. Part 3
Certainly not before 1825 was the name Bedlington given to the breed, although Major Cowan wrote to Stonehenge and forwarded him a pedigree of the blue and tan dog Askem II., which went back as far ...
-The Bedlington Terrier. Part 4
The Bedlington terrier is not an expensive dog to buy, as a first-class specimen may be obtained at prices varying from 10 to 20, or even as low as a five pound note. When we remember that quite a t...
-Chapter IX. The Irish Terrier
The Irish terrier is a cheap dog, is it not? said a friend to me the other day. I do not know about its cheapness, I replied; but if you have a really good one it will bring a hundred pounds any ...
-The Irish Terrier. Part 2
The father of the present pedigree family was Killiney Boy, bred by Mr. Burke, of Queen's-street, Dublin. He passed from him to a Mr. Flannigan, residing at Castlenock, which place was purchased by M...
-The Irish Terrier. Part 3
The competition between the brother and sister, Play Boy and Poppy, was always very keen, the bitch being cropped; but the dog carried a pair of beautiful ears. Poppy was the richer in colour, and wh...
-The Irish Terrier. Part 4
My terriers sometimes spend a day in digging out a rat; they go in hammer and tongs, and make a great show of having it out at once, but there is a method in their madness, as they keep an eye on the...
-The Irish Terrier. Part 5
Few people in those early days gave much attention to the appearance of their terriers, and if they were game, and good at destroying rats and other vermin, they would be kept and bred from, and as t...
-The Irish Terrier. Part 6
At the Dublin show in 1878 there were even fewer competitors, a dog and bitch class being given, with no restrictions as to weight. In the former there were four entries, and in the latter three, but...
-The Irish Terrier. Part 7
General Appearance The Irish terrier should appear to be of good constitution, somewhat rough in outlook, but thoroughly symmetrical. As the stern is high set on it gives the hind quarters a somewh...
-The Irish Terrier. Part 8. Temperament
Dogs that are very game are usually surly or snappish. The Irish terrier, as a breed, is an exception, being remarkably good-tempered, notably so with mankind, it being admitted, however, that he is, ...
-Chapter X. The Welsh Terrier
This terrier is our most modern introduction, and one is apt to wonder how it was that for so long his merits have been overlooked. The dog of which I write as a Welsh terrier was unknown until some e...
-The Welsh Terrier. Part 2
We have thus quite four diverse opinions, let alone two or three more which emanated from the decisions of modern show bench judges who had awarded prizes to narrow-chested, flat-ribbed abortions, sof...
-The Welsh Terrier. Part 3
The Welsh Terrier Club is quite a powerful and representative body, and it has issued the following description of the dog it has under its wing: Head The skull should be flat, and rather wider ...
-Chapter XI. The Scottish Terrier
From all I have been told, and from what I have read, I believe that this little dog is the oldest variety of the canine race indigenous to North Britain, although but a comparatively recent introduct...
-The Scottish Terrier. Part 2
My favourite author then proceeds to write of their use in taking his master quickly up to a wounded deer, but, irrespective of the latter, no one can say that St. John's description does not altogeth...
-The Scottish Terrier. Part 3
Of the original Scottish terriers some there were with semi-erect ears, others with prick ears, as so admirably produced in Mr. Wardle's picture at the commencement of this chapter. The prick ears are...
-The Scottish Terrier. Part 4
There has of late been a tendency to give prizes to dogs with unusually long and narrow heads. Now this is again wrong, for with undue length of head or face, the character of the dog is lost quite as...
-The Scottish Terrier. Part 5
The Scottish Terrier Club, established in 1889, has for its secretary Mr. A. McBrayne, Irvine, and there is also a Scottish Terrier Club for England, the older establishment of the two, of which Mr. H...
-Chapter XII. The Dandie Dinmont Terrier
A COMMON belief prevails that Sir Walter Scott invented the Dandie Dinmont terrier. Such was, however, not the case, and long before 1814, when Guy Mannering was written, and in which Scotland's gre...
-The Dandie Dinmont Terrier. Part 2
Terriers and hounds were, a century or two ago, kept in considerable numbers in the north of England, and in Scotland, by the farmers and others, who required them to kill the foxes which at certain s...
-The Dandie Dinmont Terrier. Part 3
The true breed, proceeds Mr. Scott, was quickly spread amongst Mr. Davidson's friends; but next to Davidson himself for keeping up and distributing the pure race at the early period of its history wer...
-The Dandie Dinmont Terrier. Part 4
About this time Messrs. Robert and Paul Scott, of Jedburgh, who tramped their district as pedlars or hawkers, were well known for the excellent Dandie Dinmonts they possessed, and right proud were the...
-The Dandie Dinmont Terrier. Part 5
Latterly a considerable amount of discussion has been going on relative to the reputed trimming of the coat and face of the Dandie Dinmont. That this has been done, and is still done in many instances...
-The Dandie Dinmont Terrier. Part 6
What the above favourite dog of mine was as a companion, no doubt any ordinary Dandie Dinmont would prove to be under proper training, and, even at the risk of being considered egotistical, I have ven...
-The Dandie Dinmont Terrier. Part 7
Coat This is a very important point; the hair should be about 2in. long, that from skull to root of tail a mixture of hardish and soft hair, which gives a sort of crisp feel to the hand. The hard s...
-Chapter XIII. The Skye Terrier
The question which is now agitating those who are most concerned in the welfare and well-being of the Skye terrier is a peculiar one. What is it? Is it to be a toy or a sporting dog? is the question...
-The Skye Terrier. Part 2
This was the description of work for which the old Skye terrier was kept in the Duke of Argyll's kennels at Inverary and Roseneath, and from our personal knowledge of their build and temperament, we ...
-The Skye Terrier. Part 3
Skye terriers were included in the first volume of the Kennel Club Stud Book, and the best of the early dogs were such as Mr. Pratt showed, including Dunvegan, Gillie, and others; Mr. J. Bowman's (Dar...
-The Skye Terrier. Part 4
The Skye terrier is a purely Scottish dog, and is not generally well known in England. But England is the chief market for his disposal, and purchasers are readily imposed upon by a large showy speci...
-The Skye Terrier. Part 5
Perhaps the best couple of Skye terriers now being shown are Mrs. W. J. Hughes' Laird Duncan and Wolverley Roc. I like them specially because they are so straight in the coat, and are of a very much l...
-The Skye Terrier. Part 6
For club use and general reference full descriptive details are subjoined: - 1. Head Long, with powerful jaws and incisive teeth closing level, or upper just fitting over under. Skull: wide at ...
-Chapter XIV. The Clydesdale Or Paisley Terrier
I ONCE heard a man describe this dog as neither fish, fowl, nor good red herring, meaning no doubt in his original way to express his opinion that the Clydesdale or Paisley terrier was neither one t...
-The Clydesdale Or Paisley Terrier. Continued
In character and disposition, the Paisley terrier resembles the Skye, being good-natured, intelligent, and lively. They make excellent house pets, and those who desire something more substantial than...
-Chapter XV. Yorkshire And Other Toy Terriers
The charming, aristocratic little dog we now know as the Yorkshire terrier has been identified as such for but a comparatively short period, the Kennel Club adopting this nomenclature in their Stud Bo...
-Yorkshire And Other Toy Terriers. Part 2
When the Yorkshire terrier is about three to four months old, he begins to change his colour down the sides, on his legs, etc.; but even at nine or ten months the back is still very dark, excepting in...
-Yorkshire And Other Toy Terriers. Part 3
The best of the variety are certainly kept in few hands. Amongst the older breeders were, in addition to the names already mentioned, Mr. John Inman, of Brighouse, Yorkshire; Mr. J. Spink, Bradford; M...
-Yorkshire And Other Toy Terriers. Part 4
There are some other rough-haired toy terriers, which are, however, of little account, because they have never been bred to any particular type. Occasionally wee things very like what a miniature Skye...
-Chapter XVI. Other Terriers
Although in the foregoing pages I have given fourteen chapters to what may well be called different varieties of the terrier, several of the race remain yet unrepresented, and without any reproach on ...
-Other Terriers. Part 2
About the same period, or a little later, a sporting stonemason had a little terrier, not more than 61b. in weight, a cross-bred one, with a longish coat, and not the slightest sign of the Yorkshire t...
-Other Terriers. Part 3
Let me try to describe one of the best terriers that ever went to ground after otter, badger, fox, or marten. Old Mart weighed 12lb. or 141b.; long-backed, broken-haired, with black back and tan legs...
-Other Terriers. Part 4
Crab was the name of another little terrier, a great celebrity with one of the best north country packs of otter hounds. I fancy he was of the same strain that Tom Andrews, the Cleveland huntsman, for...
-Other Terriers. Part 5
Dr. Edwardes Ker wrote to me some six or seven years ago of a strain of black and tan wire-haired terriers, once common in Suffolk and round about. His informant, Mr. Sharpe Sharpe, was at that time a...
-Other Terriers. Part 6
Another writer says the Sealy Ham terrier, whose fame has spread far beyond the boundaries of Pembrokeshire, is mostly used for otter hunting. It is a distinct type of terrier, which by judicious bree...
-Other Terriers. Part 7
He now mounted the bank, and crossed the meadow, where he was soon hidden from view by the high grass . . . Tally ho! he has again taken to the water, and concealed himself in one of his old holts, o...
-Other Terriers. Part 8
Mr. Jacob Robson, who has been connected with the Border Foxhounds all his life, and whose family, I need scarcely say, is one of the very oldest in the county, says: The strain of terriers that h...
-Other Terriers. Part 9
In the chapter on fox terriers allusion was made to a strain once owned by the late Mr. Donville Poole at Maybury Hall, Shropshire, and which had more than a local notoriety for gameness. It had been ...
-Other Terriers. Part 10
Early on the morning of the trials out comes the Squire with his friends and retinue, and the sport begins, the vermin being placed at the far end of the receptacles prepared for them, such as trough...
-Works Published By Horace Cox
British And Irish Salmonidae By Francis Day, CIE., F.L.S., and F.Z.S. This work is an exhaustive treatise on the Salmonidae of the British Islands, and will be found equally valuable to the Angler,...
-Books on Dogs
The Collie Or Sheepdog A History and Description of the Collie or Sheepdog, in his British Varieties. By Rawdon B. Lee, Kennel Editor of the Field, and Author of The Fox Terrier. Demy 8vo., pri...
-Yacht Architecture
By Dixon Kemp, Associate of the Institute of Naval Architects and Member of the Council. This work enters into the whole subject of the laws which govern the resistance of bodies moving in water, and ...
-A Manual Of Yacht And Boat Sailing
By Dixon Kemp, Associate of the Institute of Naval Architects and Member of the Council, Author of Yacht Designing and Yacht Architecture. This edition has been largely re-written, and contains a ...









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previous page: A Manual Of Toy Dogs: How To Breed, Rear, And Feed Them | by Leslie Williams
  
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next page: The Dogs Of Great Britain, America, And Other Countries. Their Breeding, Training, and Management in Health and Disease | by John Henry Walsh (Stonehenge)