Best size from eleven to thirteen inches at shoulder. Any tendency to weediness should be carefully avoided, and the height at shoulders should just about equal the length from top of shoulders to root of tail. The size should not be judged by weight but by height, as they should weigh heavily for their size. A dog about thirteen inches high should weigh about fifteen pounds. Very small specimens - i. e., under nine inches high - are only desirable if the type, soundness, compactness, and sturdiness are unimpaired. Feet close, firm, and hard. They and the lower part of the legs should not be too heavily feathered.

The expression of face should be very alert, and very sweet. The dogs should be very bold and courageous. Timidity is a great fault.

As to proportion of head, if the total length of head be about six inches, the ears should be set about four inches apart. The whole head, seen from a bird's-eye point of view, should be a triangle, with the tip of nose as apex. General appearance should be that of an exquisitely pretty little sporting dog, very strong, and exceedingly smart and compact.

Measurements Of A Good Black Specimen

Breadth of skull at eyes from each outside corner of eyes across head..........

Indus

5

Length of skull.........

4

Length of nose............

2 1/4

Circumference of skull.........

10 1/2

Circumference of muzzle under eyes.........

6 3/4

Space between eyes..........

1 3/8

Length of ears (leather)........

4

Space between ears when not pricked.........

4 1/4

Height at shoulders.........

13

Length from top of shoulders to root of tail......

13

Length of forelegs to elbow.........

7 1/2

Breadth at shoulders........

6

Breadth at quarters.........

6

Girth........

19

Feathering on tail flag........

6

Waistcoat feathering.........

4

The Reds are usually smaller and have less curly coats.

Scale Of Points

General appearance, including condition and smartness....

15

Coat..........

10

Head and expression........

15

Eyes.........

5

Curve and proportion of muzzle........

5

Set-on of ears..........

5

Legs and feet.........

5

Colour............

5

Action and soundness of limb............

10

Size............

5

Compactness, levelness of back, and set of tail...........

10

Boldness and alertness.......

10

100

Soundness of teeth is a consideration, but they are usually good.

A description of the Papillon or Butterfly Spaniel is given in the "Kennel Encyclopaedia," Part II, Vol. I, and I reproduce by the Editor's kind permission two photographs which represent the prick-eared variety and the drop-eared variety. The former shows the influence of the Melitaeus or Pomeranian blood and the latter has an extraordinary resemblance to the Henrietta of Orleans Spaniel. These dogs are the link between the Chinese Spaniel and our modern Blenheim. Mignonne retains the precise type of three hundred years ago and is not far off the Veronese Spaniel. The other specimens, Ripo, Pipo, and Susette, illustrated in the "Encyclopaedia," show a different type altogether, but Carlo is very like Mignonne. The smaller these dogs are the more they are valued, especially if they are under four pounds in weight. The average weight is four to seven pounds. I also reproduce a photograph of Mrs. Francis' Yvette, a tiny scrap of a dog showing exactly the same character.