If a sunken nose is right, what becomes of the points specially awarded for "stop"? Providentially, Nature asserts itself, and puppies with this deformity usually die of cleft palate or some other malformation or disease before reaching maturity. Another exaggeration is the low placing of the ears. Fashion says the ears should be set low, but there should be moderation in all things, and it makes a dog ridiculous to have his ears set half way down his neck, giving him a silly, gooselike expression. The ears should be set forward and be very broad at the joint of the skull. On no account should they be set right at the back of the head or be very narrow at the top. Historically, highly set ears are correct, though not of course absurdly high. Wrinkles should be absolutely barred on the face or muzzle.

I think that the present scale of points as laid down by the Toy Spaniel Club requires total revision. I do not know from whence it has been evolved, but there is no authority whatever for it in any of the classical works on dogs, nor has a search in the British Museum revealed any other books from which it could have been taken. The standard, however, as set forth by the Toy Spaniel Club, is taken from Stonehenge, 1878 edition, and contains a statement which no doubt was true thirty years ago, but is no longer applicable to the modern Toy Spaniel, namely, that "there is seldom any defect in symmetry."

The scale of points of the Toy Spaniel Club is as follows:

King Charles And Ruby And Tricolours

Symmetry, condition, size, and soundness of limb1.

20

Head...........

15

Stop..............

5

Muzzle............

10

Eyes...........

10

Ears........

15

Coat and feathering........

15

Colour..........

10

100

Proportion of head points, 40 to 60.

Blenheims

Symmetry, condition, size, and soundness of limb..

15

Head....

15

Stop..............

5

Muzzle............

10

Eyes...........

10

Ears...............

10

Coat and feathering............

15

Color and marking................

15

Spot...........

5

100

Proportion of head points, 40 to 60.

Vero Shaw gives the points of the Toy Spaniel as follows:

1The clause as to soundness was introduced on my representations a few years ago.

Skull.........

10

Stop and squareness of jaw......

10

Shortness of face........

10

Ears.......

10

Coat, including colour......

30

Size.......

10

General appearance.........

10

Body and legs...........

10

100

Proportion of head points, 30 to 70.

It will be seen that shortness of face was given no predominance, all other points being equally important except coat, which was three times as important as anything else.

The American Toy Spaniel Club adopted McRaper's standard, but a short time ago adopted our own, with a few slight variations.

American scale of points:

Black-And-Tan, Tricolours And Red

Symmetry, condition, and size............

20

Head........

15

Stop........

5

Muzzle.........

10

Eyes.........

10

Ears..........

15

Coat and feathering.......

15

Colour..........

10

100

Proportion of head points, 40 to 60.

Blenheims

Symmetry, condition, and size.....

20

Head........

15

Stop.........

5

Muzzle.......

10

Eyes.........

5

Ears.........

10

Coat and feathering.....

15

Colour and markings.........

15

Spot...........

5

100

Proportion of head points, 35 to 65.

Stonehenge's Oldest Scale Of Points In 1867:

Form of head.....

10

Nose and formation of jaw.....

10

Eyes.....

10

Ears......

10

General coat and texture.......

10

Form and compactness..........

10

Brilliancy of colour........

10

Feather of legs and feet.......

I0

Size and weight..............

I0

Carriage of tail............

10

100

Proportion of head points, 30 to 70.

This is the oldest authentic English scale of points, and, after all is said and done, it is only forty-one years old, and the second standard drawn up by the same author with an improved scale of points was twenty years more recent still.

His standard for the Tricolours was as follows:

Black nose, white muzzle flecked with tan and black; a white blaze or leaf ran up his forehead, cheeks tan, and a large red spot over each eye. His collar, belly, and legs white, the latter spotted with red or tan and black; the margins of the thighs and tip of his tail white. (According to this, Mrs. Percy's present Champion Casino Girl would be correctly marked.) The haunches well coated with an abundance of black, white, and tan, long, silky straight hair; the tail well " fleud," cropped, and carried low; the ears very large, drooping, and heavily feathered; the chest and both fore and hind legs being well furnished down to the toes, so that the foot should be almost hidden in coat. Full, prominent, large, weeping eye. Compact. Top weight six pounds.

The Black-and-tan came in highest fashion between 1850 and 1867, and the standard of that date for it and the Blenheim is as follows:

"Round skull, large, round, prominent eyes, with a deep indentation or stop between them. Lower jaw short, projecting beyond the upper, and turn up. Large ears touching the ground are highly esteemed, but this is a figurative expression - drooping close to head and thickly coated. Back of all the legs must be densely feathered, and the feet must be almost lost in feather, which ought to project beyond the nails. Short and compact Tail low. Protrusion of tongue most objectionable."

It must be remembered that this standard was Stone-henge's own invention.

Henry Webb, 1872, adds:

"His coat should be silky, straight, and very abundant and of the richest colour, the black being a raven black and the tan a rich mahogany. Where there is white mixed it is a demerit. The black should be altogether free from white. He should have tan of this rich red quality on his cheeks and the inner margin of the ear. His lips should be tan, and he should have a spot of the same colour over each eye. The larger the spot is, the better. His cheeks should be well tanned, also his chest or mane, all his legs, his belly, the feather of his haunches, his vent, and the under plumage of his tail."