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Hints To Purchasers Of Horses | by Charles Knight



The following little Treatise is intended to convey a correct idea of the proper shape and action of the horse and also, by pointing out the various imperfections to which he is subject, as well as the best method of discovering those defects, to render the purchase of the animal, usually considered an affair of hazard, a matter of comparative security.

TitleHints To Purchasers Of Horses
AuthorCharles Knight
PublisherCharles Knight
Year1825
Copyright1825, Charles Knight
AmazonHints to Purchasers of Horses
Hints To Purchasers Of Horses
-Preface To Hints To Purchasers Of Horses
The following little Treatise is intended to convey a correct idea of the proper shape and action of the horse; and also, by pointing out the various imperfections to which he is subject, as well as t...
-Hints To Purchasers Of Horses
There are so many good horses of comparatively different shapes, and so many, which possessing the same useful properties, are widely different in general appearance, that it would be difficult to sin...
-Points Requisite To Form A Perfect Horse
The Head The head should be small, and free from fleshiness; not projecting in front from the forehead downwards, (which is called Roman-nosed,) but, if any thing, rather hollow in that part, than ot...
-The Paces Of The Horse
The Walk A horse, in his walk, should begin by stepping boldly away, with his knees well bent, and his foot up, and placed down again flat; the feet if any thing first; with his hind legs tucked clos...
-The Horses Gallop
A horse, in his gallop, should not go high, and fighting, with his knees too much bent; nor should his forelegs be confined; they should be put boldly forward, not confined, and pottering, not romping...
-Cutting With The Horse
Here be it observed, a horse in all his paces should go clear, and not cut, or touch one leg with the other. He cannot go too near if he does not go to cut. Those horses go to cut their fore-legs, tha...
-General Indications Of A Horses Condition
A great body, and sheath, and small head, indicate a good constitution; and a great head, and light body the contrary. An experienced person can tell a soft horse, or a hot one, in a great degree, by ...
-The Horses Mouth
Another indispensable requisite is, that a horse have a good mouth, and as this does not depend half so much upon the mouth itself, as upon the neck, and its junction with the head and shoulder, I mus...
-Directions To Horse Purchasers
Of course every man wishes for a sound horse, without defect in wind, limb, or sight. The various imperfections which occur in each I shall endeavour to point out, and I begin with the eye. The Horse...
-The Horses Legs
Take notice that the legs should not be tottering, and inclining forward either at the knee, or ancle; and that the ancle joints should not be large in front. The back sinews, also, should not appear ...
-The Horses Hocks
Next examine the hocks: observe that, as you stand on either side of them, there should not be any projection at the back of the joint called a curb; and as you stand behind them, that the inside of t...
-Finding The Horses Age
Next examine the mouth to ascertain the age. Yearlings and two-year-olds are alike in mouth, and must be judged by general appearance. At three years old, the horse has four horse teeth, two above, an...
-The Horses Feet
Be particularly attentive to the feet; for according to the old saying, no foot, no horse. First of all observe that one foot should not be less than the other; and that they should not be indented, o...
-How A Horse Should Be Shown
Always have the horse you are about to purchase shown quietly; because, when he is agitated, a slight lameness may escape your observation; and always see him ridden, that you may judge how he wears h...
-Testing A Horses Wind
With regard to wind, some horses naturally possess greater freedom of breathing than others; for instance, a horse with large open nostrils, a wide gullet, a rather short neck, and a deep, wide chest,...
-Discovering Horses Bad Habits
Crib-biting Crib-biting is a bad habit to which many horses are addicted. It con sists in taking hold of the manger, and at the same time drawing in the breath, accompanied with a gulping noise. The ...
-Conclusion
I shall therefore conclude with advising all persons, as the surest way to be fortunate with horses, always to buy those that are young and sound; without blemish, with good action, and most particula...









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previous page: The Farmers Ready Reference Or Hand Book Of Diseases Of Horses And Cattle | by S. C. Orr
  
page up: Horse Books
  
next page: Training Young Horses To Jump | by Geoffre Brooke