Inside shutters folding into boxes require to have the box-shutter about one inch wider than the flap, in order that the flap may not interfere when both are folded into the box. The usual margin shown between the face of the shutter when folded into the box and the quirk of the stop-bead, or edge of the casing, is half an inch; and, in the usual method of letting the whole of the thickness of the butt hinge into the edge of the box-shutter, it is necessary to make allowance for the throw of the hinge. This may, in general, be estimated at 1/4 of an inch at each hinging; which being added to the margin, the entire width of the shutters will be 1 1/2 inches more than the width of the frame in the clear. Then, to ascertain the width of the box-shutter, add 1 1/2 inches to the width of the frame in the clear, between the pulley-stiles; divide this product by 4, and add half an inch to the quotient, and the last product will be the required width. For example, suppose the window to have 3 lights in width, 11 inches each. Then, 3 times 11 is 33, and 4 1/2 added for the wood of the sash gives 37 1/2; 37 1/2 and 1 1/2 is 39, and 39 divided by 4 gives 9!; to which add half an inch, and the result will be 10 1/4 inches, the width required for the box-shutter.

306. - Proportion: Width and Height. - In disposing and locating windows in the walls of a building, the rules of architectural taste require that they be of different heights in different stories, but generally of the same width. The windows of the upper stories should all range perpendicularly over those of the first, or principal, story; and they should be disposed so as to exhibit a balance of parts throughout the front of the building. To aid in this it is always proper to place the front door in the middle of the front of the building; and, where the size of the house will admit of it, this plan should be adopted. (See the latter part of Art. 50.) The proportion that the height should bear to the width may be, in accordance with general usage, as follows:

The height of basement windows, 1 1/2 of the width.

"

"

principal-story

"

2 1/8

"

"

"

second-story

"

1 7/8

"

"

"

third-story

"

1 3/4

"

"

"

fourth-story

"

1 1/2

"

"

"

attic-story

"

the same as the width.

But, in determining the height of the windows for the several stories, it is necessary to take into consideration the height of the story in which the window is to be placed. For, in addition to the height from the floor, which is generally required to be from 28 to 30 inches, room is wanted above the head of the window for the window-trimming and the cornice of the room, besides some respectable space which there ought to be between these.