Under the authority conferred by these general and special planning laws, planning commissions have been established in cities, towns and villages of many states. In other states commissions have been established by municipal charter amendments under home-rule provisions of state constitutions or laws, and in other cases commissions have been appointed without specific authorization by the state. Depending upon the authority for their appointment, the powers and duties of the commissions, and the extent to which the municipal legislative body must take cognizance of their recommendations, planning commissions are commonly classified as official or unofficial. A commission established in accordance with the terms of a state enabling act or a city ordinance or by-law adopted by the legislative body of the municipality is termed an official commission, while other groups such as those appointed informally by the mayor or other administrative official as an advisory committee, or those representing local civic organizations or chambers of commerce and acting only in an advisory capacity with no legal authority to carry out their recommendations, are classified as unofficial commissions or committees.....

1 Adapted from Survey of City Planning and Related Laws in 1929 (mimeographed circular). Division of Building and Housing, U.S. Department of Commerce.

2 [Progress in planning. - The number of states which have enacted planning legislation and also the number of city-planning commissions in the United States may be obtained from the Division of Building and Housing, U.S. Department of Commerce.]