Outside Entrances

One ceiling or one side outlet. One single-pole switch.

Porches

One ceiling or one side outlet. One single-pole switch. One convenience outlet, 18 in. from floor, if floor area is in excess of 100 sq.ft.

Vestibule

One ceiling or side outlet and one single-pole switch if floor area is in excess of 16 sq.ft.

Hall

One ceiling outlet and one single-pole switch. If there are two doorways more than 10 ft. apart, two three-way switches. Convenience outlets - one for each 12 ft. of baseboard to be installed in wall or baseboard approximately 12 ft. apart.

1 Recommended by the Electrical League of Cleveland (rev. 1928).

Wiring plan for a typical residence

Fig. 45. - Wiring plan for a typical residence. From Home Lighting Fundamentals. By permission of General Electric Company, Nela Park, Cleveland, Ohio.

Stair Hall

One ceiling outlet and 2 three-way switches. Convenience outlets - one for each 12 ft. of baseboard to be installed in wall or baseboard approximately 12 ft. apart.

Living Room

One ceiling outlet if room is nearly square. If length is more than 1 1/2 times the width 2 ceiling outlets, or 4 side bracket outlets may be substituted for one ceiling outlet or 6 side bracket outlets may be substituted for 2 ceiling outlets. For one doorway, one single-pole switch. For 2 doorways more than 10 ft. apart, 2 three-way switches. Conven- ience outlets - one for each 12 ft. of baseboard to be installed in wall or baseboard approximately 12 ft. apart.

Living Room Mantel

Two side outlets in wall above mantel, or 2 convenience outlets in mantel shelf.

Sun Room

One ceiling outlet. For one doorway, one single-pole switch. For 2 doorways more than 10 ft. apart, 2 three-way switches. Convenience outlets - one for each 12 ft. of baseboard to be installed in wall or baseboard approximately 12 ft. apart.

Dining Room

One ceiling outlet. For one doorway, one single-pole switch. For 2 doorways more than 10 ft. apart, 2 three-way switches. Convenience outlets - one for each 12 ft. of baseboard to be installed in wall or baseboard approximately 12 ft. apart.

Breakfast Room

One ceiling outlet. One single-pole switch. One duplex convenience outlet just above level of table top.

Kitchen

One ceiling outlet. For one doorway, one single-pole switch. For 2 doorways more than 10 ft. apart, 2 three-way switches. One ceiling or side outlet over sink controlled by switch or pull chain. One duplex convenience outlet 4 ft. high near sink.

Refrigerator Room

One ceiling outlet. One single-pole switch. One convenience outlet.

Rear Hall

One ceiling outlet. For one doorway, one single-pole switch. For 2 doorways more than 10 ft. apart, 2 three-way switches.

Hall, Second Floor

One ceiling or side outlet. Two three-way switches. One convenience outlet 4 ft. from floor.

Bed Rooms

One ceiling outlet. One single-pole switch. Convenience outlets - one for each 12 ft. of baseboard to be installed in wall or baseboard approximately 12 ft. apart.

Closets

One lighting outlet controlled either by pull chain or door switch, if floor area is in excess of 10 sq. ft.

Bath Room

Two side wall outlets, one on each side of mirror located 5 ft. from floor. One single-pole switch. One duplex convenience outlet at right of lavatory 4 ft. from floor.

Basement

-One ceiling outlet at foot of stairs controlled by a switch at the head of the stairs. One ceiling outlet located at or near the furnace.

One ceiling outlet over laundry trays. One outlet in ceiling, 3 ft. in front of the center of laundry trays, for clothes washer. One convenience outlet.

Note

The outlet for the clothes washer shall be equipped with a porcelain key socket hung 5 1/2 ft. from the floor.

Fruit Room

One lighting outlet. Coal room. - One lighting outlet.

Garage

Two ceiling outlets; one outside outlet; one duplex convenience outlet in center of rear wall, 4 ft. from floor.

[Note. - The Red Seal Plan of electric wiring inaugurated by the Society for Electrical Development is a service plan designed to help home builders. Red Seal installation are built from materials which conform to the requirements of the National Electric Code or any other code that has requirements in excess of the National Code. It does not restrict the home builder to any product or any particular manufacturer. The local electric league will plan the Red Seal layout. If the layout is adopted the league will inspect the work in progress. Upon completion the Red Seal certificate is issued to the building. (For additional information on the Red Seal Plan see "The Red Seal Plan of Electric Wiring," Small Home, December, 1928).]