The connection between dining room and kitchen is of prime importance. A double-swing door leading directly from one to the other is most convenient of all. A pantry between dining room and kitchen has the advantage of cutting off odors and noise; and if equipped with a sink and a china cupboard, table dishes and silver can be washed and stored there, leaving the kitchen free for other work. Such a pantry, however, even when narrow, does lengthen by several feet the distance to be traveled and adds another doorway between kitchen and dining room. As the name "butler's pantry" often given to it implies, it is better adapted to a large house with servants. For the small house in which the homemaker and her family do most of the preparation and serving of food, too much can hardly be said in praise of the pass cabinet as a saver of steps.....

The plans above of rectangular kitchens show carefully studied arrangements

Fig. 59. - The plans above of rectangular kitchens show carefully studied arrangements. Note the easy access from range to dining room, sink to dining room, and refrigerator to pass closet. (Courtesy of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.)

The relation of the kitchen to other centers, indoors and outdoors, where the homemaker works herself or supervises others, is another point to consider. Laundry and furnace room, for instance, should be easily reached from the kitchen.....

There should also be easy access from the kitchen to the entrance doors, to stairs to the second floor and to the cellar, to telephone, and to toilet. In a house with a center hall there can almost always be arranged a short route from the kitchen to the front door that does not lead through living room or dining room.

Is the kitchen to have the prevailing wind in winter or the prevailing breeze in summer? Is it to have sun in morning, afternoon, or throughout most of the day? What shall be the outlook from the windows? .... These are also important questions which should influence the location of the kitchen. The answers depend partly on climate and partly on personal preference. In a hot climate the kitchen should if possible open onto a screened porch, and in any case the outlook should be made pleasant. A trellis of vines, a hedge, or a row of Lombardy poplars are an effective screen for many undesirable features. The sand box or swing for the children can often be located in view of a kitchen window so that an eye can be kept on them at play.