Where one floor is laid over another it is worth one-fourth more to lay the second floor than the first. Thus if it is worth 60 cents per square to lay the first floor, it is worth 75 cents per square to lay the second, or $ 1. 35 Per square for both. Framing floors for brick buildings may be estimated at the same rate as for frame, for, while there is usually less framing, more time is required to place joists in position and level up, thus making the labor about equal. As a building progresses in hight more time is required to place joists in position, hence 10 per cent, should be added to each succeeding story after the first. The outside walls of a house may be estimated as follows:

To frame and raise, per square ........

$0.60

to

$0.90

Sheeting the same, per square ........

.45

to

.60

Siding the same, per square .........

1.20

to

1.75

Total .............

$2.25

to

$3.25

Thus the outside walls of a house may be estimated at $2.25 to $3.25 per square.

Framing should include raising and sheeting; and siding should be estimated sufficiently high to cover the cost of building scaffolds. It is worth one-third more to sheet a building inside than outside, and twice as much to sheet it diagonally. The siding of a house is subject to large variations, as a man can often side three or four times faster on some buildings than he can on others. The amount an average workman will put on in a day depends upon the number, size and shape of the openings around which he has to side, the hight of the building and the amount of scaffolding he has to do. Difficult places to side can be readily seen on a building or even from a plan, and the siding should be estimated sufficiently high to cover the cost. I have known men to put on siding for 60 cents per square, but not one man in ten can make anything like respectable wages at this price, even on the plainest kind of work and under the most favorable circumstances. Some men may be able to put on four squares a day and perhaps a little more than that, but the large majority will fall short of four, and some will not put on more than two squares a day. The average is therefore not more than three squares per day, which would amount to $1.80 per day, with chances of not doing so well. In estimating siding or sheeting by the square no deduction is made for openings. Roofs may be estimated as follows:

For framing, per square .........

$0.60

to

$1.20

For sheeting, per square ..........

.45

to

.70

For shingling, per square ..........

1.25

to

1.75

Total ..........

$ 2.30

to

$3.65

Thus to frame, sheet and shingle a roof it is worth from $2.30 to $3.65 per square. Each hip or valley in a roof is worth from 75 cents to $1.50 for sheeting and shingling. Hips and valleys cannot be shingled or sheeted with as much speed as plain roofs, and are seldom estimated high enough. The shingling of belt courses and gables with dimension shingles is worth from $2 to $3.50 per square, according to the windows and difficult places with which the workman has to contend.