Fig. 52.   Showing Improper Manner of Running the Lath.

Fig. 52. - Showing Improper Manner of Running the Lath.

Fig. 53.   Showing Proper Method of Spacing Studding.

Fig. 53. - Showing Proper Method of Spacing Studding.

As the second floor joists in buildings usually rest On a ribbon board framed into the studding, it is necessary that the studding on both sides of the building on which the joists have their bearing should be regularly spaced. Many are in the habit of laying off the openings and spacing the studding to conform thereto. This method causes great irregularity of spacing, making some wide and some narrow spaces, which either bring the joists overhead out of position or leaves them standing alone on the ribbon without any means of being properly fastened.

Fig. 54.   Showing Studding Set to Conform to Openings

Fig. 54. - Showing Studding Set to Conform to Openings

Studding should be spaced regardless of the openings, after which the openings may be laid out and the necessary studding may be cut and headers put in, as shown in Fig. 53. This method leaves the studding all regularly spaced, and the joists will all nail to the side of a studding and come in the proper order. Now, if the studding are set to conform to the openings, as shown in Fig. 54, it breaks up the regular order of spacing, leaving some spaces wide and some narrow. It will also be noticed that we have two more studding spaced on the sill and plate than in Fig. 53. It is, therefore, evident that if the joists are regularly spaced many of them will stand alone on the ribbon board, with no place to properly fasten them, as shown. If they are placed over to the side of the studding, as they frequently are, then they are thrown off their centers and the spacing is wrong.