In the first case a raglet2 may be required to receive the flashing or apron of a lead gutter at the back of the cornice, as shown in Fig. 147, or the gutter may be formed in the stone itself, as in Fig. 454, care being taken to line the hollow with lead or cement if the stone is at all porous. Sometimes the whole upper surface of the cornice is covered with lead.

Cornice And Blocking Course

This may be seen in the section Fig. 476. The top of the blocking course is generally grooved to receive the lead of the gutter or apron, or the latter may be allowed to extend over it.

Cornice And Balustrade

This is shown in Fig. 148. The small columns are called balusters, and are divided into groups by solid panelled blocks called "'pedestals." In Fig. 148 a half pedestal is shown in elevation at the angle.

Fig. 147. Stone Cornice. Sectional Elevation showing Saddled Joint at x.

Fig. 147. Stone Cornice. Sectional Elevation showing Saddled Joint at x.

Fig. 148. Cornice and Balustrade.

Fig. 148. Cornice and Balustrade.

1 Sometimes called "water-jointing." 2 See p. 220.

Cornice And Parapet

This is a similar construction to that last mentioned, except that the cornice is surmounted by a solid wall. See Fig. 321 and others.