Figs. 63 to 66 show plans of two courses, and sections taken at two points of a 14-inch wall; and Figs. 67 to 70 give the same information for an 18-inch wall built in double Flemish bond with false headers. In the 14-inch wall it will be noticed that the headers consist only of half bricks, having no bond with the interior of the wall.

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Fig. 65.

Fig. 66. Double Flemish Bond with False Headers, 14 inch wall.

Fig. 66. Double Flemish Bond with False Headers, 14-inch wall.

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Fig. 69.

Fig. 70. Double Flemish Bond with False Headers, 18 inch wall.

Fig. 70. Double Flemish Bond with False Headers, 18-inch wall.

In the 18-inch wall only the headers in every alternate course are half bricks. Thus, in the 14-inch wall all the headers, and in the 18-inch wall half the entire number of headers, are false.

The effect of this is to cause a straight joint through the whole depth of the wall on both sides, as shown in the section on C D in each case.

This arrangement is often adopted when the facing is of superior bricks, in order to economise them. The half bricks look like headers, though they are useless for the bond.

Single Flemish Bond consists of Flemish bond on one face of the wall, with English bond on the other.

This combination is made in order that the work may on the face look like Flemish bond, the appearance of which is, or was, supposed to be superior to that of English bond, and, at the same time, to get rid of the defects of Flemish bond in the inferior of the wall.

Figs. 71 to 82 give plans of two courses and sections taken at two points of walls of different thicknesses in single Flemish bond.

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The sections on C D show that the straight vertical joint which occurs on both sides in most cases of double Flemish bond, is now confined to the Flemish facing.

It will be noticed that false headers are used in alternate stretching courses throughout the Flemish facing. These can be avoided, as before explained; but they are more economical, and are therefore generally preferred, though their use leads to bad work in more ways than one (see Part II.)

In some cases a combination of the two methods is adopted. Some of the headers in every course are left entire - the intermediate ones being broken in two.

The consideration of the evils connected with the practice of facing walls with work superior to that in the backing forms a part of the Advanced Course, and is entered upon in Part II.