Candy bricks are of a similar character, though perhaps harder and yet more brittle, and they are supposed to "wear rougher." They are of a lighter colour, of a more watery appearance, and suitable for the same purposes as the clinkers.

Concrete and breeze bricks are made of cement and gravel or breeze, and used for fixing purposes. They are supposed to be fireproof, and yet suitable and easy for use with woodwork to be attached thereto.

Dust bricks are blue bricks, which have been made in moulds sprinkled with dust instead of sand.

Pressed bricks are those made by machinery under pressure, and Dressed bricks have had their sides and beds beaten with a "dresser," which gives them a better arris and more even face.

Of course, it will be understood that most of the above kinds of bricks can be moulded (before being burnt) into any shape, form, or size, to suit requirements.

Purpose-made Bricks are of innumerable kinds, and made in various clays. The chief kinds are enumerated below, though it must be understood that this list is not, and cannot be made, exhaustive; special circumstances requiring special bricks, which should be ordered early, before the operations of building are commenced, so that no delay may be caused while they are being made, as their manufacture occupies a considerable time in some cases.

Varieties Of Bricks PracticalBuildingConstruction01 2

Fig. 1.

Varieties Of Bricks PracticalBuildingConstruction01 3

Fig. 2.

Bullnoses are bricks with rounded angles. On the accompanying plate (showing special-purpose-made bricks) fig. 1 represents a bullnosed angle to a 2|-inch radius; fig. 2 a double bullnosed angle to a 2 1/4-inch radius;fig. 3 a bullnosed angle to a 4 1/2-inch radius; fig. 4 a double bullnosed angle to a 4 1/2-inch radius.

Varieties Of Bricks PracticalBuildingConstruction01 4

Fig 3.

Varieties Of Bricks PracticalBuildingConstruction01 5

Fig. 4.

Varieties Of Bricks PracticalBuildingConstruction01 6

Fig. 5.

Cants are jamb-bricks with an angle cut, as shown in fig. 5; fig. 6 being a double cant.

Birdsmouths are for internal angles other than right angles; fig. 7 representing a stretcher and fig. 8 a header. The converse, as shown in fig. 9, is called a squint, and is used for external angles.

Jamb-bricks of another kind are represented by figs. 10 and 11; while fig. 12 illustrates a string brick, and figs. 13 and 14 stretcher and header plinths.

Varieties Of Bricks PracticalBuildingConstruction01 7

Fig. 6.

Varieties Of Bricks PracticalBuildingConstruction01 8

Fig. 7.

Varieties Of Bricks PracticalBuildingConstruction01 9

Fig 8.

Varieties Of Bricks PracticalBuildingConstruction01 10

Fig. 9.

Varieties Of Bricks PracticalBuildingConstruction01 11

Fig. 10.

Varieties Of Bricks PracticalBuildingConstruction01 12

Fig. 11.

Varieties Of Bricks PracticalBuildingConstruction01 13

Fig. 12.

Varieties Of Bricks PracticalBuildingConstruction01 14

Ftg.13.

Varieties Of Bricks PracticalBuildingConstruction01 15

Fig. 14.

Varieties Of Bricks PracticalBuildingConstruction01 16

Fig. 15.

Varieties Of Bricks PracticalBuildingConstruction01 17

Fig. 16.

Of the one-centred arch brick, figs. 15 and 16 show respectively a header and a stretcher, and fig. 17 a compass brick, fig. 18 representing a circular brick.

Camber arch-bricks are shown by fig. 19, and elliptical arch-bricks by fig. 20.

Varieties Of Bricks PracticalBuildingConstruction01 18

Fig. 17.

Varieties Of Bricks PracticalBuildingConstruction01 19

Fig. 18.

Varieties Of Bricks PracticalBuildingConstruction01 20

Fig. 19.

Varieties Of Bricks PracticalBuildingConstruction01 21

Fig. 20.

Varieties Of Bricks PracticalBuildingConstruction01 22

Fig.2l.

Varieties Of Bricks PracticalBuildingConstruction01 23

Fig. 22.

Varieties Of Bricks PracticalBuildingConstruction01 24

Fig. 23.

Varieties Of Bricks PracticalBuildingConstruction01 25

Fig. 24.

Varieties Of Bricks PracticalBuildingConstruction01 26

Fig. 25.

Varieties Of Bricks PracticalBuildingConstruction01 27

Fig. 26.

External rounded angles are represented by fig. 21, and internal ditto by fig. 22; while square angles, both internal and external, are depicted by fig. 23.

Of moulded bricks, quoins are illustrated by fig. 24; moulded bull-noses by fig. 25; moulded squints by fig. 26; moulded cants by fig. 27; external angles by fig. 28, and internal angles by fig. 29.

Varieties Of Bricks PracticalBuildingConstruction01 28

Fig. 27.

Varieties Of Bricks PracticalBuildingConstruction01 29

Fig. 28.

Varieties Of Bricks PracticalBuildingConstruction01 30

Fig. 29.

Soaps are bricks 9 inches long, 2 1/4 inches only in breadth, and 3 inches-high; while splits are 9 inches long, 4 1/2 inches broad, but only about 1 1/2-inch high (or thick).

Stocks are the sound marketable clamp burnt London bricks when the "place bricks" have been removed and the "picked " stocks selected for superior purposes - the "stock" is the medium quality - and they are-mostly burnt in clamps, having a quantity of ash refuse and breeze incorporated in them, so that very little fuel is required to burn them.

Brindled bricks' are inferior common blue bricks, of a browny blue colour, very hard and durable, and suitable for engineering purposes. It should be noted that good blue bricks are made out of a hard blue or purple marl, which is ground to a powder and pugged into a plastic state ready for moulding. The best and soundest bricks are excellent for all damp situations, some being specially annealed for use in storage tanks for chemical gases, etc., and all true blue bricks should be close, hard, and absolutely non-absorbent, though not necessarily blue all the way through Sometimes dust bricks are made by the dry process similar to tiles.