255. Loathing

Loathing. Before the lathing is begun, the inspector should see that the furring and grounds are properly placed and are plumb and square; also, that the angles of chimneys and other projections are right angles. If the lathing is wood, he should see that the laths are free from bark and loose knots, and that they are put on with proper spacing, well nailed, with no springy ends, and end joints broken at least every 18 inches. Over door and window openings, the laths should extend to the next stud on either side of the frame. As far as possible, the lathing should run the same way, as cracks are likely to appear in the plastering at the places where the direction of the laths is changed. The junction of brick and wooden walls, as well as lintels and unfurred timbers, should be covered with metal lath, as before mentioned.

256. Plastering

Plastering. If lime plaster is to be used, the inspector should see that the lime is fresh and without unburned lumps, and should allow none to be used that has begun to slake. The sand used should be sharp and free from earthy matter. The hair should not be added until the lime has become thoroughly slaked and cooled, and the mortar should be made at least a week before use. It is well to become acquainted with the appearance of good mortar, so as to be able to judge its quality.

Before beginning to plaster, the openings in the building should be closed up with boards or canvas. In winter, a building in which plastering is to be done must be heated; lime mortar, especially, is rendered worthless if frozen and thawed; hard plasters, also, should not be permitted to freeze. The inspector should see that the first coat is well clinched between the lath, and is thoroughly dry before the second coat is put on. If the scratch coat is to be laid on brick, the walls should be well wetted before applying the mortar. Special care should be taken with the brown coat, as the appearance of the finished work depends to a great extent upon good workmanship in applying this coat. Its surfaces should be plane, with straight and square angles and a level ceiling. If hard plasters are used, the directions furnished by the makers should be carefully followed, in regard to mixing sand, etc. (if not obtained already mixed). Plaster that has partially set before use should be rejected. 2-21

Table 5

Description of Work.

Average Cost in Cents, per Square Yard.

New York.

St. Louis.

* Two-coat work on brick or tile ...................................

30

to

35

17

to

20

* Three -coat work on wood lath ............................

35

to

40

20

to

25

* Three-coat work on stiffened wire lath ‡ ..............................................

70

55

to

60

* Three-coat work on expanded metal ‡

70

55

to

60

† Windsor cement or Adamant on brick or tile..........................

40

† Acme or Royal cement on brick or tile............................

40

22

to

25

† Windsor cement or Adamant on stiffened wire lath ‡ .................

75

† Acme or Royal cement on stiffened wire lath ‡......................

75

60

Cost of stiffened wire lath on wood joist, about ...........................

35

Cost of expanded metal on wood joist about..................

25

30

Cost of perforated metal lath on wood joist.................

25

Stucco cornices less than 12-inch girth, per lineal foot..................

20

20

When more than 12-inch girth, per square foot.....................

24

20

* Lime mortar, the last coat white finish. † Finished with lime putty and plaster.

% When applied on wood joists or furring. When applied over metal furrings, the cost is about 20 cents per yard more.

Enrichments cost from 8 cents up per lineal foot for each member.

measurement and cost.

257. Lathing is Figured by the square yard, and is usually included with the plastering, although in rural districts the laths are often put on by the carpenter. Plain plastering, such as that on walls and ceilings, is always measured by the square yard. Provision should be made in the contract as regards deduction for openings, for, unless this is agreed on, the custom of the locality will govern. In some parts of the country one-half the area of openings is deducted, and elsewhere no allowance is made for openings, unless they are very large.

Where the work is difficult to put on, or where there are many angles, as in closets, the underside of stairs, etc., the price per yard is usually more than for broad, unbroken surfaces. This is also the case when staging is required, and when the surfaces are other than plane. Ornamental work, of course, costs much more than plain; cornices, moldings, etc. are usually measured by the lineal foot, with extra allowance for corners.

258. Cost

Cost. The ordinary prices for wooden lathing and lime plastering on plain surfaces vary from 20 to 35 cents per square yard, according to the cost of materials, number of coats, character of work, and also with the locality; 25 cents for ordinary three-coat work with white finish is about the average price throughout the country. The hard plasters cost from 2 to 10 cents per square yard more than lime plaster. Metal lathing costs from 20 to 40 cents per square yard more than wooden laths. In Table 5 is given the average cost of plastering in the cities of New York and St. Louis.