Flooring

In estimating matched flooring, a square foot of 7/8" stuff" is considered to be 1 ft. B. M. If the flooring is 3 in. or more in width, add one-quarter to the actual number of board feet, to allow for waste of material in forming the tongue and groove; if less than 3 in. wide, add one-third. Flooring of 1 1/8 in., finished thickness, is considered to be 1 1/4 in. thick; and for calculating it the following rule may be used: Increase the surface measure 50 per cent. (This consists of 25 per cent, for extra thickness over 1 in., and 25 per cent, for waste in tonguing and grooving.) To this amount add 5 per cent, for waste in handling and fitting.

In figuring the area of floors, the openings for stairs, fireplaces, etc. should be deducted.

Siding

Siding is usually measured by the superficial foot. No deduction should be made for ordinary window or door openings, as these usually balance the waste in cutting and fitting. Careful attention must be given to the allowance for lap. If 6" (nominal width, actual width 5 5/8 in.) siding, laid with 1" lap, is used, add one-quarter to the actual area, in order to obtain the number of square feet of siding required. If 4" stuff is used, add one-third to the actual area. When, as above noted, no allowance is made for openings, the corner and baseboards need not be figured separately.

Cornices

Cornices may be measured by the running foot, the molded and plain members being taken separately. A good method of figuring cornices is as follows: Measure the girth, or outline, and allow 1 cent for each inch of girth, per lineal foot. This price will pay for material and for setting, the cost of the mill work being estimated at 50 per cent., or 1/2 cent.

Quantity Of Material Set Per Day

It is impossible to estimate this exactly, as it depends on the skill of the artisan, his rapidity of working, the ease or difficulty of the work, besides numerous accidental circumstances. The subjoined figures, while founded on knowledge gained in many years' experience, are only intended to give an idea of the relative quantities, and not as a standard to be adhered to in all cases. The estimates are based on a 9-hour day, and wages of $2.25 per day. If the hours or pay be less or greater, the result will be correspondingly diminished or increased. Unless otherwise noted, the figures represent the labor of two men working together.

Quantities Of Material Put In Place Per Day

Class of Material.

FeetB. M. or Number.

Remarks.

Studding, 2" X4" or 2" X 6"

600-800

Wall or Partition.

Rafters................................

500-600

Floor joists, 2" X 10" or 3" X12".........................

1,500

Sheathing, unmatched......

1,000

Laid horizontally.

Sheathing, unmatched......

800

Laid diagonally.

Sheathing, matched .........

800

Laid horizontally.

Sheathing, matched..........

GOO

Laid diagonally.

Sheathing, roof...................

1,000

Plain gable roof.

Sheathing, roof...................

500

Much cut up by hips, valleys, dor-mers, etc

Siding ...............................

700

Includes fitting and setting corner boards, base, trim, and a folding.

Posts and beams over cellars ................................

400-500

Includes scarfing and doweling.

Plaster grounds, lineal feet, per man..........................

400

For base and wainscot. leveled and straightened in good shape

Bridging, number of pairs, per hour. per man

12

Includes cutting and setting.

False jambs around openings, per hour, per man

1