Cost

The following figures are average prices of stone when the transportation charges are not excessive; the figures are not given as fixed values, but to show the relative costs. They are based on quarrymen's wages of $2.25 per day, and stone cutters' of 83.00 per day.

First-class rock-face bluestone ashlar, with from 6" to 10" beds, dressed about 3 in. from face, will cost, ready for lay ing, from 35 to 45 cents per square foot, face measure; while very good work will cost from 25 to 40 cents per square foot. Regular coursed bluestone ashlar, 12 to 18 in. high, with from 8" to 12" beds, will cost about 50 cents per square foot. To this (and the previous figures) must be added the cost of hauling, which on an average will be about 2 cents per square foot. The cost of setting ashlar may be taken at about 10 cents per square foot.

The rough stock for dimension stone will cost, at the quarry, if Quincy granite, in pieces of a cubic yard, or less, from 50 to 75 cents per cubic foot; if bluestone, about 50 cents; if Ohio sandstone, about 30 cents per cubic foot; if Indiana limestone, about 25 cents per cubic foot; and if Lake Superior red stone, about 40 cents per cubic foot.

Flagstones for sidewalks, ordinary stock, natural surface, 3 in. thick, with joints pitched to line, in lengths (along walk) from 3 to 5 ft., will cost, for 3' walk, about 8 cents per square foot (if 2 in. thick, 6 cents); for 4' walk, 9 cents; and for 5' walk, 10 cents per square foot. The cost of laying all sizes will average about 3 cents per square foot. The above figures do not include cost of hauling.

Curbing (4" X 24" granite) will cost, at quarry, from 25 to 30 cents per lineal foot; digging and setting will cost from 10 to 12 cents additional; and the cost of freight and hauling must also be added.

The following figures show the approximate cost of cut bluestone for various uses:

Flagstone, 5", size 8 ft. X10 ft., edges and top bush-hammered, per sq. ft., face measure ..........................

$ .65

Flagstone, 4", size 5 ft. X 5 ft., select stock, edges clean cut, natural top, per sq. ft...........................................

.30

Door sills, 8 in. X 12 in., clean cut. per lineal foot..........

$1.25

Window sills, 5 in. X 12 in., clean cut, per lineal foot

.80

Window sills, 4 in. X 8 in., clean cut, per lineal foot ...

Window sills, 5 in. x 8 in., clean cut, per lineal foot

.60

Lintels, 4 in. X 10 in., clean cut, per lineal foot...............

.60

Lintels, 8 in. X 12 in., clean cut, per lineal foot................

1.10

Water-table, 8 in. X 12 in., clean cut, per lineal foot

1.25

Coping, 4 in. X 21 in., clean cut, per lineal foot................

1.10

Coping, 4 in. X 21 in., rock-face edges and top, per lin. ft.

Coping, 3 in. X 15 in., rock-face edges and top, per lin. ft.

.25

Coping, 3 in. X18 in., rock-face edges and top, per lin. ft.

.30

Steps. sawed stock, 7 in. X 14 in., per lineal foot............

.90

Platform, 6 in. thick, per square foot................................

To the prices of cut stone above given must be added the cost of setting, which, for water-tables, steps, etc., will be about 10. cents per lineal foot, and, for window sills, etc., about 5 cents per lineal foot. In addition, allow about 10 cents per cubic foot for fitting, and about 5 cents per cubic foot for trimming the joints after the pieces are set in place.

A stone cutter can cut about 6 sq. ft. of granite per day, 8 sq. ft. of bluestone, and about 10 sq. ft. of Ohio sandstone or Indiana limestone. These figures are for 8-cut patent-hammered work. For rock-face ashlar (beds worked about 3 in. from face, the rest pitched), a workman can dress from 25 to 28 sq. ft. of random ashlar per day, and from 18 to 20 sq. ft. of coursed ashlar. In dressing laminated stone, from 2 to 3 times more work in a day can be done on the natural surface than on the edge of layers. In figuring cut stone, an ample allowance should be made for waste, which, on an average, will be 25 per cent.