The most common materials for baths are (a) porcelain, or earthenware lined with porcelain enamel; (b) cast iron, painted or lined with porcelain enamel; (c) tinned sheet-copper lining, inclosed by an iron or steel jacket, commonly called iron-clad baths. Wood-cased tinned copper baths are out of date. Class (a) is used in the very finest of work; class (6) in plain substantial work; and class (c) in cheap work. The two kinds of baths which predominate are the Roman shape, which slopes at both ends, and usually has the connections at the back, and the French shape, which slopes at one end only, with connections at the foot. French shapes are adapted to corners; Roman, for placing along a wall, away from corners. The following dimensions are taken from a list of baths made by a reputable firm:

Dimensions Of Baths

Dimensions.

Roman Shape.

French Shape.

* Porcelain.

†Iron Enameled.

‡ Porcelain.

†Iron Enameled.

Ft.

In.

Ft.

In.

Ft.

In.

Ft.

In.

Length...................

5

0

4

6

4

6

4

6

Length, including fittings................

4

10

4

10

Width outside.........

2

5

2

5

2

5

2

4

Width, including fittings................

2

9

2

9

Height on legs..........

2

1

1

11 1/2

2

1

2

0

Depth......................

1

7

1

7

1

7

1

8

Width of roll rim...

0

3

2 1/2

0

3

2 1/2

* A 5' 6" bath is the same height, depth, and width of roll rim. but is 1 in. wider.

† The sizes of these baths increase by jumps of 6 in., the other dimensions remaining about the same.

‡ A 5' bath has same dimensions excepting length; a 5' 6" and a 6' bath are 1 in. wider.

Porcelain baths are variously classed by different makers, but usually alphabetically; class a means perfect, without flaw, warp, or twist; class 6, slightly imperfect, a little warped or rough in the enamel, but hardly perceptible; class c, defective, badly warped, cracked, and blistered.

Marble safes for baths are countersunk to a depth of 1/4 in. and are 1 1/2 in. thick; they usually project from 3 to 6 in. beyond the outside line of the bath and its trimmings, and should be nearly flush with the floor.

Spray baths and shower baths, furnished with hot and cold water, should be provided with a mixing chamber and a thermometer, the bulb of which must be located in the center of the current. Spray and shower combinations are supplied by makers to fit their baths, but special ones are also furnished, independent of baths. A countersunk marble or slate floor slab 3 ft. 6 in. square, is usually set under a combination, and the bathroom floor is made water-tight. Porcelain receptors, 3 ft. 6 in. square, 9 in. high, 6 in. deep, with 2i in. roll rim. are preferable, however. About 20 ft. of brass tubing, closely per-forated with very fine holes, is sufficient for a good spray. A shower should not be less than 8 in. in diameter. The height from the floor to shower should be about 7 ft. 6 in. The combination should be provided with a 3" waste pipe, and a 4" or 5" flush strainer in the center of floor slab or receptor.

Seat and foot baths vary in sizes and shapes. The following are dimensions of well-designed roll-rim baths: