The thickness of brick walls for dwellings not higher than three stories ought to be 12 inches, although 8 inches is considered by many experts to be quite thick enough for small houses. If the foundation walls are of rubble stone they should be 8 inches thicker, and if of brick or concrete they should be 4 inches thicker. Usually the walls will be faced with some variety of face brick, in which case they should be bonded into the wall. If a running bond is used, the face brick should be bonded into the backing at every sixth course by cutting the corners of each brick in that course of face brick and putting in a row of diagonal headers behind them, and also using suitable metal anchors in bonding courses at intervals not exceeding 3 feet. Where Flemish bond is used, the headers of every third course should be a full brick and bonded into the backing. If the face brick is of different thickness to that of the common-brick backing, the courses of the exterior and interior should be brought to a level bed at intervals of about eight courses in height of face brick, and the face tied into the backing by a full header course or other suitable method.

English Bond.

English Bond.

Dutch Bond or English Cross Bond

Dutch Bond or English Cross Bond.

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