Until within a few years past, linen or cotton cord was alone used for connecting the weights with the sashes of double hung windows, and cord is still more extensively used than either ribbons or chains. For windows of ordinary size a good braided cord will wear for a long time, and this material will probably never be entirely displaced by metal. The architect, however, should always specify the particular brand of cord to be used and also the size. The leading brands at present are the Samson spot cord and the Silver Lake sash cord, both of which are superior to the ordinary braided cords. The Samson cord offers one advantage that architects will appreciate, in that it has a colored strand woven through it, which shows in spots on the surface and thus enables the architect to tell at a glance that no other cord has been substituted. The Silver Lake sash cord has a label on every hank. The following numbers should be specified for different heft of weights:

Fig. 423   Monarcb Sub Chian.

Fig. 423 - Monarcb Sub Chian.

Cable chain.

For ash weights of........

10 to 15 lbs.

15 to 25 lbs.

25 to 35 lbs.

35 to 45 lbs.

Samson Spot Cord, No. 7

(1/12-inch.)

8 (finch.)

9 (7/32-inch.)

10 (5/16-inch.)

Silver Lake Cord, No. 7A

(7/23-inch.)

8A ( inch.)

9A (7/32-inch.)

Chains - It will usually be found cheaper and more satisfactory in the end to hang all sashes weighing over 40 pounds with some form of sash chain or ribbon, and indeed, cord is now seldom used in the better class of office and public buildings.

There are several styles of sash chains in the market, the style most largely used being the flat link chain, of which, perhaps, the best pattern is shown in Fig. 423. For suspending very heavy sashes, doors and gates, the cable chain, shown in Fig. 424, has been extensively used.

The manufacturers of the Norris pulleys, however, claim that a riveted chain having joints only one way is almost sure to break when even slightly twisted, and that it is better to use two chains of the link pattern running side by side over the same pulley.

The strongest sash chains are made of a bronze mixture which looks like copper, but is tougher and harder.

Sash Ribbons. - These are now also extensively used in hanging the sashes of the better class of buildings. The ribbons are made of steel and aluminum bronze or of some mixture of aluminum, and in 3/8, , 5/8, and 7/8-inch widths. They are claimed to be practically indestructible, and work easily and without noise. The 3/8-inch ribbon may be used for sash weighing up to 100 pounds (50 pound weights). For a window 6 feet 10 inches high and 3 feet wide, glazed with plate glass, the ribbons with attachments will cost about 75 cents.

Sash ribbons are now manufactured by a number of firms who also make the necessary attachments for weight and sash.

For the best working of windows hung with ribbons, the following size pulleys should be used:

For sash

weighing

not over

40

pounds,

2

-inch.

"

"

"

60

"

2

"

"

"

"

100

"

2

"

"

"

"

150

"

3

"

"

"

"

250

"

3

"

"

"

"

300

"

4

"

"

"

"

350

"

4

"