360. Measuring Plaster Work

Lathing is always figured by the square yard and is generally included with the plastering, although in small country towns the carpenter often puts on the laths.

Plastering on plain surfaces, as walls and ceilings, is always measured by the square yard, whether it be one, two or three-coat work, or lime or hard plaster.

In regard to deducting for openings, custom varies somewhat in different portions of the country, and also with different contractors. Some plasterers allow one-half the area of openings for ordinary doors and windows, while others make no allowance for openings less than 7 square yards.

Returns of chimney breasts, pilasters and all strips less than 12 inches in width should be measured as 12 inches wide. Closets, soffits of stairs, etc., are generally figured at a higher rate than plain walls or ceilings, as it is not as easy to get at them. For circular or elliptical work, domes or groined ceilings, an additional price is also made. If the plastering cannot be done from tressels an additional charge must be made for staging.

Stucco cornices or paneled work are generally measured by the superficial foot, measuring on the profile of the moulding. When less than 12 inches in girth they are usually rated as 1 foot. For each internal angle 1 lineal foot should be added, and for external angles, 2 feet.

For cornices on circular or elliptical work an additional price should be charged.

Enriched mouldings are generally figured by the lineal foot, the price depending upon the design and size of the mould.

Whenever plastering is done by measurement the contract should definitely state whether or not openings are to be deducted, and a special price should be made for the stucco work, based on the full size details.

361. Cost

The cost of lime plastering on plain surfaces, including wooden laths, varies from twenty to thirty-five cents per yard, according to the times, locality, number of coats and quality of work. For ordinary three-coat work, with white finish, twenty-five cents is probably about the average price for the entire country. The author has known very good work to be done at twenty cents per yard, but there was no profit above the wages of the men.

Hard plasters cost from two to ten cents per yard more than lime plaster, according to the price of lime and freightage on the hard plaster.

Wire or metal lathing will cost from twenty-five to forty cents per yard more than if wood laths were used.

The following figures give the average price for various kinds of plastering in the cities of New York and St. Louis :

DESCRIPTION OF WORK.

AVERAGE COST IN CENTS PER SQUARE YARD.

Lime Mortar:

New York.

St. Louis.*

1 Two-coat work on brick or tile....................

30

to

35

17

to

21

1 Three-coat work on wood laths.........................

35

to

40

20

to

25

1 Three-coat work on stiffened wire laths.....................

70

..

1 Three-coat work on expanded metal3...............................

..

55

Windsor Cement or Adamant on brick or tile......................

40

..

2 Acme or Royal cement plaster on brick or tile.............

40

22

to

26

2Windsor Cement or Adamant on stiffened wire laths...................

75

..

2 Acme or Royal cement plaster on stiffened wire laths...........

75

60

Cost of stiffened wire lath on wood joist, about..................

35

..

Cost of expanded metal on wood joist...................

24

30

Cost of Bostwick lath on wood joist................

..

25

Stucco cornices, less than 12 inches girth, per lineal foot.......

20

20

When more than 12 inches girth, cost per square foot...............

24

20

Enrichments cost from 8 cents up per lineal foot for each member.

1. The last coat to be white finish.

2. Finished with lime putty and plaster.

3. When applied on wood joist or furring : when applied over metal furrings the cost is about 20 cents per yard more.

For scratch and brown coats on wood laths, with -inch grounds, the following quantities of materials should be required to 100 square yards: 1,400 to 1,500 laths, 10 pounds of three-penny nails, two and one-half casks or 500 pounds of lime, 45 cubic feet or fifteen casks of sand and four bushels of hair.

For the best quality of white coating allow 90 pounds of lime, 50 pounds of plaster of Paris and 50 pounds of marble dust.

* These prices are about the average asked in the West.