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An Architectural And Historical Account Of Crosby Place, London | by Edward L. Blackburn



The Author has been induced to offer this Account of Crosby Place to the Public, for the purpose of supplying several facts connected with its history, which previous writers, more capable, though less fortunate than himself, have not had the means of ascertaining or of making known.

TitleAn Architectural And Historical Account Of Crosby Place, London
AuthorEdward L. Blackburn
PublisherJohn Williams, Library Of Architecture And The Fine Arts, Charles Street, Soho Square
Year1834
Copyright1834, Edward L. Blackburn
AmazonAn Architectural And Historical Account Of Crosby Place, London

Compiled from original and unpublished sources, with an appendix of illustrative documents and fac-simile autographs of several of its ancient possessors.

Preface

The Author has been induced to offer this Account of Crosby Place to the Public, for the purpose of supplying several facts connected with its history, which previous writers, more capable, though less fortunate than himself, have not had the means of ascertaining or of making known. To the attention and kindness of friends, which he begs thus publicly to acknowledge, he is indebted for the facilities which have stimulated and enabled him to do this: to what extent remains to be seen; time, opportunity and a more able medium might have done more. Such as it is, however, the Author presents his History of Crosby Place, in the hope that, though the additional information contained in it may be but small, yet, being an addition, he shall not have laboured in vain, but have "saved and recovered somewhat from the deluge of time".

10, Lancaster Place,

19th of December, 1833.

-Crosby Place
* I do love these auncient ruines, We never tread upon them, but we sett our foot. Upon some reverende historic. WEBSTER. The first reference to Crosby Place, or more correctly speaking, to the si...
-Crosby Place. Part 2
It may be a matter of some difficulty, at this time, to fix correctly the situation of this alley, owing to the many alterations which this part of St. Helen's has undergone; but a supposition may be ...
-Crosby Place. Part 3
The description of house which, about the middle of the 15th century began to gain preference, was the quadrangular, the earlier instances of which seldom exceeded a single court.* Under this appearan...
-Crosby Place. Part 4
The state apartments at Crosby Place surrounded the first or outer court; this, I believe, was not a common practice, although Mayfield Manor-house has the same peculiarity. In most examples, the oute...
-Crosby Place. Part 5
It can hardly be attempted, at this time, to fix correctly the appearance of this range, or the use's to which the apartments in it were appropriated. The remains strengthen the idea, that it had a co...
-Crosby Place. Part 6
The alterations in the interior of this once splendid hall, occasioned by the different uses to which it has been in more modern times applied, leaves much to be inferred as to its probable appearance...
-Crosby Place. Part 7
It has been previously observed, that a horizontal cornice, broken by the descent of the main springers, terminates the roof above the lateral windows. This cornice surmounts an open-panelled freize, ...
-Crosby Place. Part 8
Nothing now remains, as previously mentioned, of the finish at this end of the hall. In many examples a large window relieved the wall above the high-pace, as at Westminster, Winchester, Guildhall, an...
-Crosby Place. Part 9
The exterior and interior appearance of the lights of this bay was the same as that of the windows immediately adjoining; but whether it had a flat arch internally, and a groined roof, like that of th...
-Crosby Place. Part 10
The north wall of the parlour is much mutilated; indeed the greater part of it is of brick, the conse-quence, perhaps, of successive repairs, although much of that material has evidently been used in ...
-Crosby Place. Part 11
Dispensing with this qnestion, it may be sufficient to say, that so late as 1756 a stair-case existed somewhere in this situation, for in that year Sam-brooke Freeman, Esq. let to Joseph South and oth...
-Crosby Place. Part 12
Sir Thomas Billesden, Haberdasher. Richard seems to have been concerned in dealings with several of the citizens. To Sir Edmund Shaw, Mayor in 1482, he sold much plate, viz. four pots of silve...
-Crosby Place. Part 13
It would almost seem, that great anxiety existed among the parties interested in Crosby Place, under Bonvisi's will, on the accession of this Peter Crowle, and something like an impression obtains, th...
-Crosby Place. Part 14
The first notice of Lord Compton's possession occurs in July, 1609, four months after Sir John Spencer's death, when he and hie son, Spencer Compton, thus named, probably, in compliment to his grandfa...
-Crosby Place. Part 15
During Sir John Langham's tenancy, it has been stated, that Crosby Place was used as a prison for the Royalists, This included a period of 34 years, at the end of which time his son, Sir Stephen Langh...
-Appendix No. I. Memoir Of Sir John Crosby
Of the early part of the life of Sir John Crosby we have no certain record. It would appear that, in Stow's time, something like a tradition existed of bis having been a foundling, and that he derived...
-Memoir Of Sir John Crosby. Continued
This tomb is still to be seen: it is composed of freestone, and is the usual table monument of the time. The upper part is enriched, or corniced, by a cluster of mouldings, and the sides are divided b...
-Appendix No. II. Original Lease Of The Site Of Crosby Place To John Crosby
Dec ondentura facta int' Aliciam Ashfelde Priorissam domus sive Prioratus Sce Helene infra Bisshoppesgate London & ejusdm loci Conventum ex pte una et Johem Crosby Civem & Grocerum London ex pte alter...
-Appendix No. III. Will Of Alderman Bonde
In the name of God hereafter followeth the last Will and testament of William Bonde, Alderman of London; written the xxth daye of October, 1574. In the name of God. I Wyllyam Bond, Alderman of London...
-Will Of Alderman Bonde. Continued
And as concernige the order and disposition of my lande, I doe declare my last Will and Testament of the same in mannere and forme as insueth (enaueth): - ffirst, I deuise and bequeath Margaret, my we...









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