No other stair, perhaps, looks so well at the starting point as one having a bulinose step. In Fig. 44 are shown a plan and elevation of a flight of stairs having a bullnose tread. The method of obtaining the lines and setting out the body of the stairs, is the same as has already been explained for other stairs, with the exception of the first two steps, which are made with circular ends, as shown in the plan. These circular ends are worked out as hereafter described, and are attached to the newel and string as shown.

Fig. 43. Panel in Spandrel, Showing Miters on Moulding, and Shape of Section.

Fig. 43. Panel in Spandrel, Showing Miters on Moulding, and Shape of Section.

Fig. 44. Elevation and Plan of Stair with Bullnose Tread.

Fig. 44. Elevation and Plan of Stair with Bullnose Tread.

The example shows an open, cut string with brackets. The spandrel under the string contains short panels, and makes a very handsome finish. The newels and balusters in this case are turned, and the latter have cutwork panels between them.

Fig. 45. Section through Bullnose Step.

Fig. 45. Section through Bullnose Step.

Bullnose steps are usually built up with a three-piece block, as shown in Fig. 45, which is a section through the step indicating the blocks, tread, and riser.

Fig. 46 is a plan showing how the veneer of the riser is prepared before being bent into position. The block A indicates a wedge which is glued and driven home after the veneer is put in place. This tightens up the work and makes it sound and clear. Figs. 47 and 48 show other methods of forming bullnose steps. Fig. 49 is the side elevation of an open-string stair with bullnose steps at the bottom; while Fig. 50 is a view showing the lower end of the string, and the manner in which it is prepared for fixing to the blocks of the step. Fig. 51 is a section through the string, showing the bracket, cove, and projection of tread over same.

Figs. 52 and 53 show respectively a plan and vertical section of the bottom part of the stair. The blocks are shown at the ends of the steps (Fig. 53), with the veneered parts of the risers going round them; also the position where the string is fixed to the blocks (Fig. 52); and the tenon of the newel is marked on the upper step. The section (Fig. 53) shows the manner in which the blocks are built up and the newel tenoned into them.

Fig. 46. Plan Showing Preparation of Veneer before Bending into Position.

Fig. 46. Plan Showing Preparation of Veneer before Bending into Position.

Bullnose Tread 0200465

Fig. 47.

Bullnose Tread 0200466

Fig. 48. Methods of Forming Bullnose Steps.

Fig. 49. Side Elevation of Open String Stair with Bullnose Steps.

Fig. 49. Side Elevation of Open-String Stair with Bullnose Steps.

The newel, Fig. 49, is rather an elaborate affair, being carved at the base and on the body, and having a carved rosette planted in a small, sunken panel on three sides, the rail butting against the fourth side.