There is probably no other building material on which so much has been written within the last ten years; and there will be no attempt here to discuss the question except from an extremely practical standpoint. All things considered, Portland cement at $2.00 a barrel net is the most economical material to be used in general masonry. Lime is much cheaper, but of very doubtful value as generally used. The English, Scotch, and French use lime with great success; but it is always slaked in pits for at least three months prior to use, and is treated and worked so as to make it valuable for mortar, while in this country it is used after such crude treatment that it cannot be considered a material suitable for good work. Therefore lime in any form will not be further considered for masonry work.

There are now three classes of Portland cement on sale in this country. By far the largest class is that ground from an artificial clinker. Second are what is known as "slag" cements, ground largely from furnace slag. While in many of the second class the sulphur has been so far extracted as to make them identical in chemical

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

HOUSE OF MR. MAX FERNEKES, AT BROOKDALE, WIS., EIGHT MILES FROM MILWAUKEE

Fernekea & Cramer, Architects, Milwaukee, Wis. Built in 1900. For Exteriors and Interiors, See Pages 206, 234, and 250.

Cost of House -

Excavating......................

$ 25.00

Basement Wall and Cement Floor. . .

75.00

Chimney and Brick Fireplace......

120.00

Carpenter Work......................

1,650.00

Tinning........

25.00

Plastering, Inside and Outside.....

175.00

Painting (without Glass)..........

125.00

Glass (Leaded Throughout).......

67.00

Plumbing.......................

221.00

Heating (Hot-Water).............

250.00

Hardware, Special Designs, Strap Hinges on all Doors, Casement

Window-Fasteners.........................

116.00

Decorating..........................

30.00

Windmill and Well...............

170.00

Chamberlain Weather Strips.......

01.00

Kewaunee Tank......................

100.00

Total...............

$3,210.00

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

HOUSE OF MR. MAX FERNEKES, AT BROOKDALE, WIS.

Fernekes & Cramer, Architects, Milwaukee, Wis.

The Wood Finish in Second Floor is Poplar, Painted While; and the Doors Stained Mahogany, Varnished and analysis with those of the first class, and of great value in general masonry, it is wiser to avoid their use where surfaces are exposed to wear, as in sidewalks, steps, etc. Unless the work is of minor importance they should not be used unless such chemical test (independent of tests made by the manufacturers) can be obtained as will show that the sulphur therein is below 2 per cent.