In Fig. 314 is shown a large-size section through the side or stile of an ordinary window sash, with some of the dimensions given. The same section is ordinarily used for the top rail of the sash, as for the stiles at the sides, but the bottom rail is usually made heavier. A section through the bottom rail is shown in Fig. 315. In Fig. 314, A is the body of the stile, which for ordinary

RESIDENCE FOR MRS. THOS. G. GAGE, ROGERS PARK, CHICAGO, ILL.

RESIDENCE FOR MRS. THOS. G. GAGE, ROGERS PARK, CHICAGO, ILL.

John B. Fischer, Architect, Chicago, Ill.

View Looking Southeast. Lower Story Cement, Rough Sand Finish: Second Story Finish

Shingles Stained a. Warm Brown; Woodwork around Windows and Gable Stained a

Few Shades Darker than Shingles; Roof Shingles Stained a Dull Red.

For Interiors, See Page 251.

Cost of House:

Excavation...............

$ 27.50

Masonry ...............

477.20

Carpentry..............

2,375.10

Sheet-Metal Work............

70.00

Plastering..............

430.00

Plumbing and Gas fitting.......

450.00

Heating (Hot-Water)..........

449.40

Tile Work (3 Mantels. and Bath room Floor)...........

193.60

Painting and Glazing...........

212.00

Hardware.............

60.00

Decorating..............

70.00

Electric Wiring...........

80.00

Electric and Gas Fixtures..........

83.20

Window Screens............

20.00

Storm Sash..............

50.00

Window Shades.............

19.00

Cement Walk...............

23.00

Grading, Trees and Shrubs.......

72.00

Total.........

$5,162.00

Built in1903.

Double Hung Sash 0200350RESIDENCE FOR MRS. THOS. G. GAGE, ROGERS PARK, CHICAGO, ILL.

RESIDENCE FOR MRS. THOS. G. GAGE, ROGERS PARK, CHICAGO, ILL.

John B. Fischer, Architect, Chicago. The Borch Faces East toward Lake Michigan.

Double Hung Sash 0200352

good work is made 1 3/4 inches thick and 2 inches wide, not counting the rabbet for the glass. This rabbet is shown at C and is made 3/8 inch X 5/8 inch, which makes the entire stile 1 3/4 inches X 2 3/8 inches. The portion shown at B is molded in various ways, usually as shown. The glass D is held in place by means of small, triangular pieces of tin driven into the sash outside of the glass, after it has been put in, and then covered up with putty as shown at C. The bottom rail shown in Fig. 315 differs from the stiles only in size, being usually 3f inches wide instead of 2f inches.

Sashes are often made thinner than 1 3/4 inches, but if they are at all large they are likely not to stand well but will warp and twist. For very large windows the sashes should be made thicker still, being in this case 2 inches or even 2 1/4 inches thick.

Fig. 314. Section through Window Stile

Fig. 314. Section through Window Stile.

Fig. 315. Section through Bottom Rail

Fig. 315. Section through Bottom Rail.

Fig. 316. Section through Meeting Rails of Window

Fig. 316. Section through Meeting Rails of Window.