Beyond the setting of minor partitions which were not needed for the support of floor beams, the principal work of interior framing will be the furring of chimney breasts, and the forming of beams and arches. The position and size of all doors must be carefully verified, especial care being taken to allow the proper width for door casings where doors come close to the corner of any room. When the studs of all interior partitions are set up they must be bridged. This is often done by cutting in horizontal pieces between the studs (Fig. 32); but a better way is to cut in the pieces diagonally (Fig. 33). The chimneys must be enclosed by vertical studs, usually 2 X 3-inch or 2 X 4-inch, set flatwise and at least an inch away from the brick (Fig. 34), with an ample opening left for fireplaces, well trussed. All door openings must also have a truss over them, and any partitions which have no adequate support beneath them should be trussed if the arrangement of doors will by any means allow it.

Fig. 31. Chimney Furring.

Fig. 31. Chimney Furring.

The ceilings will be cross-furred with 7/8 X 3-inch strips, commonly called "strapping". These strips should be carefully levelled and straightened, as upon their evenness depends the smoothness of the ceiling, and above all it is necessary that the strips are well nailed to every joist. Grounds are next set and angle beads for lathing, but before any laths can be laid there are a number of things to be considered.