Fig. 24. Steel Square Applied to Finding Bevel for Fitting Top of Hip or Valley to Ridge.

Fig. 24. Steel Square Applied to Finding Bevel for Fitting Top of Hip or Valley to Ridge.

In like manner the thickness of the valley above the plate is found; but as the valley as shown in the plan figure, Fig. 22, projects beyond point 2 before it intersects the outside of the plates, the distance from 2 to 1 in the case of the valley will have to be measured outwards from 2, as shown from 2 to l in Fig. 23; and at the point thus found the thickness of the valley is to be measured to cor-respond with that of the common rafter as shown at m n.

In Fig. 24 is shown the steel square applied to a hip or valley timber to cut the bevel that will fit the top end against the ridge. The figures on the square are 17 and 19 1/4. The 17 represents the length of the plan line of the hip or valley for a foot of run, which, as was shown in previous figures, will always be 17 inches in roofs of equal pitch, where the plan lines stand at 45 degrees to the plates and square to each other.

The 19 1/4 taken on the blade represents the actual length of a hip or valley that will span over a run of 17 inches. The bevel is marked along the blade.

The cut across the back of the short valley to fit it against the side of the long valley, will be a square cut owing to the two plan lines being at right angles to each other.

Fig. 25. Steel Square Applied to Jack Rafter to Find Bevel for Fitting against Side of Hip or Valley.

Fig. 25. Steel Square Applied to Jack Rafter to Find Bevel for Fitting against Side of Hip or Valley.

In Fig. 25 is shown the steel square applied to a jack rafter to cut the back bevel, to fit it against the side of a hip or valley. The figures on the square are 12 on tongue and 15 on blade, the 12 representing a foot run of a common rafter, and the 15 the length of a rafter that will span over a foot run; marking along the blade will give the bevel.

The rule in every case to find the back bevel for jacks in roofs of equal pitch, is to take 12 on the tongue to represent the foot run, and the length of the rafter for a foot of run on the blade, marking along the blade in each case for the bevel.

In a 1/2-pitch roof, which is the most common in ah parts of the country, the length of rafter for a foot of run will be 17 inches; hence it will be well to remember that 12 on tongue and 17 on blade, marking along the blade, will give the bevel to fit a jack against a hip or a valley in a 1/2-pitch roof.

In a roof having a rise of 9 inches to the foot of run, such as the one under consideration, the length of rafter for one foot of run will be 15 inches. The square as shown in Fig. 25, with 12 on tongue and 15 on blade, will give the bevel by marking along the blade.

To find the length of a rafter for a foot of run for any other pitch, place the two-foot rule diagonally from 12 on the blade of the square to the figure on tongue representing the rise of the roof to the foot of run; the rule will give the length of the rafter that will span over one foot of run.

The length of rafter for a foot of run will also determine the difference in lengths of jacks. For example, if a roof rises 12 inches to one foot of run, the rafter over this span has been found to be 17 inches; this, therefore, is the number of inches each jack is shortened in one foot of run. If the rise of the roof is 8 inches to the foot of run, the length of the rafter is found for one foot of run, by placing the rule diagonally from 12 on tongue to 8 on blade, which gives 14 1/2 inches, as shown in Fig. 26. This, therefore, will be the number of inches the jacks are to be shortened in a roof rising 8 inches to the foot of run. If the jacks are placed 24 inches from center to center, then multiply 14 1/2 by 2 = 29 inches.

Fig. 26. Finding Length to Shorten Rafters for Jacks per Foot of Run.

Fig. 26. Finding Length to Shorten Rafters for Jacks per Foot of Run.

Fig. 27. Finding Length of Jack Rafter in 1/2 Pitch Roof.

Fig. 27. Finding Length of Jack Rafter in 1/2-Pitch Roof.

In Fig. 27 is shown how to find the length with the steel square. The square is placed on the jack timber rafter with the figures that have been used to cut the common rafter. In Fig. 27, 12 on blade and 12 on tongue were the figures used to cut the common rafter, the roof being 1/2 pitch, rising 12 inches to the foot of run. In the diagram it is shown how to find the length of a jack rafter if placed 16 inches from center to center. The method is to move the square as shown along the line of the blade until the blade measures 16 inches; the tongue then would be as shown from w to m, and the length of the jack would be from 12 on blade to m on tongue, on the edge of the jack rafter timber as shown.

This latter method becomes convenient when the space between jacks is less than 18 inches; but if used when the space is more than 18 inches it will become necessary to use two squares; otherwise the tongue as shown at m would not reach the edge of the timber.

Fig. 28. Finding Length of Jack Rafter in 3/8 Pitch Roof.

Fig. 28. Finding Length of Jack Rafter in 3/8-Pitch Roof.

Fig. 29. Method of Determining Length of Jacks Between Hips and Valleys; also Bevels for Jacks, Hips, and Valleys.

Fig. 29. Method of Determining Length of Jacks Between Hips and Valleys; also Bevels for Jacks, Hips, and Valleys.

In Fig. 28 the same method is shown for finding the length of a jack rafter for a roof rising 9 inches to the foot of run, with the jacks placed 18 inches center to center. The square in this diagram is shown placed on the jack rafter timber with 12 on blade and 9 on tongue; then it is moved forward along the line of the blade to w. The blade, when in this latter position, will measure 18 inches. The tongue will meet the edge of the timber at m, and the distance from m on tongue to 12 on blade will indicate the length of a jack, or, in other words, will show the length each jack is shortened when placed 18 inches between centers in a roof having a pitch of 9 inches to the foot of run.