With the covering in of the building we may turn to the completion of the inside partitions, and these must be carefully followed to see that the studs are straight and plumb. Crooked studding may be straightened by cutting with a saw on the concave side and then wedging the cut apart. All studs which bear an extra weight, as at the sides of large openings, should be examined to see that they have a sufficient support on the partition under and do not come between the studs, in which case a block should be cut in under the partition cap, and the same should be done where heavy timbers bear between studs. All corners must be examined to see that they are made solid for lathing (Fig. 28), and that provision is made for running pipes, etc. If any of the unsupported partitions running parallel with the joists are found to have a considerable span. so that there is danger of too much sagging, the difficulty may be overcome by trussing the partition at a small cost and if by any means such a partition is used to support floors or other partitions over, this should be done in any case. The studs at the sides of all openings are to be doubled, and all openings of more than three feet are to be trussed. The head of all openings should be double, with the lower piece an inch from the upper so that if there is any sagging of the upper or weight-bearing piece it will not affect the lower one to which the finish is nailed. All the partitions should be bridged, and all sliding door pockets sheathed with end joints secured, so that there will be no possibility of a board starting off. The lining of sliding door pockets should be set upon heavy sheathing paper in such a way as to prevent air drafts from the cellar which are a source of great annoyance.

Fig. 27. Collar Beam and Purlins.

Fig. 27. Collar Beam and Purlins.

Fig. 28. Corners.

Fig. 28. Corners.