For a saving of floor space, very thin partitions may be made by using small steel bars for studding; these are usually 3/4-inch channel bars set vertically about a foot apart and turned at a right angle to be fastened top and bottom. ' On one side metal lathing is stretched and wired to the bars. This is plastered with a very heavy coat of hard plaster, which squeezes through the lathing and makes a good surface to receive the plaster of the other side side of the partition, forming, when completed, a solid wall of plaster and metal about 1 1/2 inches thick. (Fig. 237.) It is necessary in this case to use a very hard setting plaster, as this gives the partition its stiffness. Special patented studs of sheet steel, made with prongs to hold the lathing, and of various depths, Fig. 238, are used in a similar maimer. Door and window frames are set in these thus partitions, by setting up a rough wooden frame to which the channel bar is screwed, as in Fig. 239, and for a nailing for chair rails, picture mouldings, and other finish, strips of wood are laced to the lathing, flush with the plastering before the plaster is applied. (Fig. 240.) Metal Lathing. Metal lathing, which is of great importance, both for fireproofing, and the finish of fireproof buildings, may be obtained in a variety of patterns and devices. The original form of metal lathing was the common wire cloth, and this is still one of the principal forms in which metal lathing is found. Improvement in the manufacture of wire cloth for lathing may be found in the various means adopted for stiffening the cloth by rods or ribs of metal. These are attached to, or woven into, the lathing which is then known as "stiffened lathing."

Fig. 236. Terra Cotta Bloc Partition.

Fig. 236. Terra-Cotta Bloc Partition.

Fig. 237. Steel and Lath Partition.

Fig. 237. Steel and Lath Partition.

Fig. 238. Steel Stud.

Fig. 238. Steel Stud.

A well-known form of stiffened lathing is the Clinton lath, which contains corrugated steel furring strips, attached to the cloth by metal clips and running across the roll every eight inches. These strips not only serve to stiffen the lathing, when stretched over furrings, but, if the lathing is applied directly to a plain surface, such as planking or brick walls, the stiffening keeps the lathing away, and allows room for the clinch of the plaster.

The Roebling stiffened lathing contains V-shaped ribs of various depth, which are woven into the cloth at 7 1/2-inch intervals. These ribs serve for a furring, and are made from 3/8 to 1 1/2 inches in depth. For special uses, ribs of 1/4-inch steel rods are used instead of the V-shaped steel. Wire cloth for lathing is run in a variety of meshes; 3 X 3 and 2 1/2 X 2 1/2 to the inch being the common mesh, and it may be obtained plain, painted or galvanized; painted lathing being very satisfactory, and more generally used than any other kind.