Fig. 69. First Floor Plan, with Hardware Items Indicated.

Fig. 69. First-Floor Plan, with Hardware Items Indicated.

The third step consists in placing on the drawings, under each door, window, or miscellaneous item, the designating numbers of the hardware appliances required, so that it will be possible, by merely referring to the plan, to ascertain just the hardware that will be required at each point. Several prints of these drawings should be made, as the successful placing of the hardware is dependent on following without deviation the lines thus laid down. The placing of a few items in wrong locations would produce confusion throughout the whole line.

The fourth step is to take three sheets of ordinary section paper ruled to quarter-inch squares each way, and to place on these sheets respectively, up and down at the left-hand edge, the layout numbers of the doors, windows, and miscellaneous items. (See Quantity Sheets, pages 52-54.) Also, across the top of the sheets, place the designating numbers of the different items of hardware required under each division. Then, in the squares at the intersections of the lines running from the plan numbers and those dropping from the hardware numbers, note the quantity required.

Fig. 70. Second Floor Plan, with Hardware Items Indicated

Fig. 70. Second-Floor Plan, with Hardware Items Indicated.

There will be many occasions when for several doors or windows the same fixtures will be required. This condition is apt to breed carelessness, and mistakes are likely to occur for lack of distinct consideration of each item. If, through lack of care, three or four unnecessary appliances are included, their cost will more than offset the entire expense of making a careful bill in the first place.

As an example of how mistakes are liable to occur, note the window indicated between windows Nos. 255 and 256 in Fig. 70. This window, being on the stair, is shown in both the first and second story floors, and the hardware therefor was included in the first-story items. Unless distinct consideration is given to each item, it would be a natural mistake to double the order for this window; it would also be a natural mistake to include blind hardware for 158, 160, 161, and 162; but, by carefully examining the elevations, it is found that no blinds are required. Further, unless the detail sections through the pantry are studied, the arrangements for drawers, cupboard, flour-box are not understood.

Fig. 71. Attic Plan, with Hardware Items Indicated.

Fig. 71. Attic Plan, with Hardware Items Indicated.

The sheets are completed by adding the numbers in the vertical columns to obtain the exact number or quantity of each item required. The success of this entire scheme depends on absolute accuracy.

At this point is it very desirable that the results be proven correct. It is generally useless to go over the work a second or third time, following the original line, since the same mistakes are generally made each time. Some independent line, accordingly, should be selected, in order to detect errors. A simple method is to add the number of appliances required for all points on the various plans, and then add the numbers on the sheet last prepared; if these sums agree, it is reasonably certain that no mistakes have been made.

For instance, counting the items required for doors throughout, we find we have as follows:

Basement

14 items

First Floor

55

"

Second Floor

4S

"

Third

"

6

It

Total.

123 items required for doors.

Adding up our quantity sheet, allowance has to be made when more than one of the items is used at one point. For instance three butts are required for each door, but they are noted on the plan as only one number.

We obtain the total of the items from the quantity sheet, as shown on page 52, as follows:

Under

D3,

the

total

93

3

=

31 items.

"

D4,

"

"

18

3

=

6

"

Item

D 5,

is doubled at one point, so that total 3

-

1

=

2 items

Items

D6

to

D21,

inclusive

=

81 items.

D 22 is only one item on the plan

=

1

"

D 23 and D 24

=

2

"

Total 1.23 items.

In case the totals do not agree, add each floor on the quantity sheet so as to locate the discrepancy on one floor. When so located, it can be quickly found.

The fi'th step is to incorporate the quantities now found in a bill or list which should distinctly state the character and quality of each, and include the requirement that all necessary screws shall be provided. In doing this, the separate items may be described in detail, or referred to under their catalogue numbers (if catalogues are at hand). Ordinarily, however, the most economical plan is to take the list to a dealer, and find what he can furnish the cheapest to meet each requirement.