This is the board forming the side of the stairway, connecting with, and supporting the ends of the steps. Where the steps are housed, or grooved into the board, it is known by the term housed string; and when it is cut through for the tread to rest upon, and is mitered to the riser, it is known by the term cut and mitered string. The dimensions of the lumber generally used for the purpose in practical work, are 9 1/2 inches width and 7/8 inch thickness. In the first-class stairways the thickness is usually 1 1/8 inches, for both front and wall strings.

Fig. 2 shows the manner in which most stair-builders put their risers and treads together. T and T show the treads; R and R, the risers; S and S, the string; O and O, the cove mouldings under the nosings X and X. B and B show the blocks that hold the treads and risers together; these blocks should be from 4 to 6 inches long, and made of very dry wood; their section may be from 1 to 2 inches square. On a tread 3 feet long, three of these blocks should be used at about equal distances apart, putting the two outside ones about 6 inches from the strings. They are glued up tight into the angle. First warm the blocks; next coat two adjoining sides with good, strong glue; then put them in position, and nail them firmly to both tread and riser. It will be noticed that the riser has a lip on the upper edge, which enters into a groove in the tread. This lip is generally about 3/8 inch long, and may be § inch or 1/2 inch in thickness. Care must be taken in getting out the risers, that they shall not be made too narrow, as allowance must be made for the lip.

Fig. 2. Common Method of Joining Risers and Treads.

Fig. 2. Common Method of Joining Risers and Treads.

Fig. 3. Vertical Section of Stair Steps.

Fig. 3. Vertical Section of Stair Steps.

Fig. 4. End Section of Riser.

Fig. 4. End Section of Riser.

Fig. 5. End Section of Tread.

Fig. 5. End Section of Tread.

If the riser is a little too wide, this will do no harm, as the over-width may hang down below the tread; but it must be cut the exact width where it rests on the string. The treads must be made the exact width required, before they are grooved or have the nosing worked on the outer edge. The lip or tongue on the riser should fit snugly in the groove, and should bottom. By following these last instructions and seeing that the blocks are well glued in, a good solid job will be the result.

HOUSE IN URBANA, ILL. White & Temple, Architects, University of Illinois

HOUSE IN URBANA, ILL. White & Temple, Architects, University of Illinois.

Walls and Roof Shingled. Cost, 15,000-$5,500. View Taken from Southwest.

For Interiors, See Page 203.

PLANS OF HOUSE IN URBANA, ILL.

PLANS OF HOUSE IN URBANA, ILL.

Fig. 3 is a vertical section of stair steps in which the risers are shown tongued into the under side of the tread, as in Fig. 2, and also the tread tongued into the face of the riser. This last method is in general use throughout the country. The stair-builder, when he has steps of this kind to construct, needs to be very careful to secure the exact width for tread and riser, including the tongue on each. The usual method, in getting the parts prepared, is to make a pattern showing the end section of each. The millman, with these patterns to guide him, will be able to run the material through the machine without any danger of leaving it either too wide or too narrow; while, if he is left to himself without patterns, he is liable to make mistakes. These patterns are illustrated in Figs. 4 and 5 respectively, and, as shown, are merely end sections of riser and tread.

Fig. 6 is a side elevation of the steps as finished, with return nosings and cove moulding complete.

A front elevation of the finished step is shown in Fig. 7, the nosing and riser returning against the base of the newel post. Often the newel post projects past the riser, in front; and when such is the case, the riser and nosing are cut square against the base of the newel.

Fig. 8 shows a portion of a cut and mitered string, which will give an excellent idea of the method of construction. The letter 0 shows the nosing, F the return nosing with a bracket terminating against it. These brackets are about 5/16 inch thick, and are 'planted (nailed) on the string; the brackets miter with the ends of the risers; the ends of the brackets which miter with the risers, are to be the same height as the riser. The lower ends of two balusters are shown at G G; and the dovetails or mortises to receive these are shown at E E. Generally two balusters are placed on each tread, as shown; but there are sometimes instances in which three are used, while in others only one baluster is made use of.

Fig. 6. Side Elevation of Finished Steps with Return Nosings and Cove Moulding.

Fig. 6. Side Elevation of Finished Steps with Return Nosings and Cove Moulding.

Fig. 7. Front Elevation of Finished Steps.

Fig. 7. Front Elevation of Finished Steps.

An end portion of a cut and mitered string is shown in Fig. 9, with part of the string taken away, showing the carriage - a rough piece of lumber to which the finished string is nailed or otherwise fastened. At C is shown the return nosing, and the manner in which the work is finished. A rough bracket is sometimes nailed on the carriage, as shown at D, to support the tread. The balusters are shown dovetailed into the ends of the treads, and are either glued or nailed in place, or both. On the lower edge of string, at B, is a return bead or moulding. It will be noticed that the rough carriage is cut in snugly against the floor joist. Fig. 10 is a plan of the portion of a stairway shown in Fig. 9. Here the position of the string, bracket, riser, and tread can be seen. At the lower step is shown how to miter the riser to the string; and at the second step is shown how to miter it to the bracket.

Fig. 11 shows a quick method of marking the ends of the treads for the dovetails for balusters. The templet A is made of some thin material, preferably zinc or hardwood. The dovetails are outlined as shown, and the intervening portions of the material are cut away, leaving the dovetail portions solid. The templet is then nailed or screwed to a gauge-block E, when the whole is ready for use. The method of using is clearly indicated in the illustration.

Fig. 8. Portion of a Cut and Mitered String. Showing Method of Constructing Stairs.

Fig. 8. Portion of a Cut and Mitered String. Showing Method of Constructing Stairs.

Fig. 9. End Portion of Cut and Mitered String, with Part Removed to Show Carriage.

Fig. 9. End Portion of Cut and Mitered String, with Part Removed to Show Carriage.