There are two main kinds of stair strings - wall strings and cut strings. These are divided, again, under other names, as housed strings, notched strings, staved strings, and rough strings. Wall strings are the supporters of the ends of the treads and risers that are against the wall; these strings may be at both ends of the treads and risers, or they may be at one end only. They may be housed (grooved) or left solid. When housed, the treads and risers are keyed into them, and glued and blocked. When left solid, they have a rough string or carriage spiked or screwed to them, to lend additional support to the ends of risers and treads. Stairs made after this fashion are generally of a rough, strong kind, and are especially adapted for use in factories, shops, and warehouses, where strength and rigidity are of more importance than mere external appearance. Open strings are outside strings or supports, and are cut to the proper angles for receiving the ends of the treads and risers. It is over a string of this sort that the rail and balusters range; it is also on such a string that al nosings return; hence, in some localities, an open string is known as a return string. Housed strings are those that have grooves cut in them to receive the ends of treads and risers. As a general thing, wall strings are housed. The housings are made from 5/8 to 3/4 inch deep, and the lines at top of tread and face of riser are made to correspond with the lines of riser and tread when in position. The back lines of the housings are so located that a taper wedge may be driven in so as to force the tread and riser close to the face shoulders, thus making a tight joint.

Rough strings are cut from undressed plank, and are used for strengthening the stairs. Sometimes a combination of rough-cut strings is used for circular or geometrical stairs, and, when framed together, forms the support or carriage of the stairs.

Fig. 10. Plan of Portion of Stair.

Fig. 10. Plan of Portion of Stair.

Fig. 11. Templet Used to Mark Dovetail Cuts for Balusters.

Fig. 11. Templet Used to Mark Dovetail Cuts for Balusters.

Staved strings are built-up strings, and are composed of narrow pieces glued, nailed, or bolted together so as to form a portion of a cylinder. These are sometimes used for circular stairs, though in ordinary practice the circular part of a string is a part of the main string bent around a cylinder to give it the right curve.

Notched strings are strings that carry only treads. They are generally somewhat narrower than the treads, and are housed across their entire width. A sample of this kind of string is the side of a common step-ladder. Strings of this sort are used chiefly in cellars, or for steps intended for similar purposes.