30. Graphical Composition. As in composition of concurrent systems, we first compound any two of the forces by means of the Triangle Law (Art. 9), then compound the resultant of these two forces with the third, then compound the resultant of the first three with the fourth and so on until the resultant of all has been found. It will be seen in the illustration that the actual constructions are not quite so simple as for concurrent forces.

Example. It is required to determine the resultant of the four forces (100,80,120, and 60 pounds) represented in Fig. 30 (a).

If we take the 100- and 80-pound forces first, and from any convenient point A lay off AB and BC to represent the magnitudes and directions of those forces, then according to the triangle law AC represents the magnitude and direction of their resultant and its line of action is parallel to AC and passes through the point of concurrence of the two forces. This line of action should be marked ac and those of the 100- and 80-pound forces, ab and bo respectively.

If we take the 120-pound force as third, lay off CD to represent the magnitude and direction of that force; then AD represents the magnitude and direction of the resultant of AC and the third force, while the line of action of that resultant is parallel to AD and passes through the point of concurrence of the forces AC and CD. That line of action should be marked ad and that of the third force cd.

It remains to compound AD and the remaining one of the given forces, hence we lay off DE to represent the magnitude and direction of the fourth force; then AE represents the magnitude and direction of the resultant of AD and the fourth force (also of the four given forces). The line of action of the resultant is parallel to AE and passes through the point of concurrence of the forces AD and DE. That line should be marked ae and the line of action of the fourth face de.

It is now plain that the magnitude and direction of the resultant is found exactly as in the case of concurrent forces, but finding the line of action requires an extra construction.

31. When the Forces Are Parallel or Nearly So, the method of composition explained must be modified slightly because there is no intersection from which to draw the line of action of the resultant of the first two forces.

To make such an intersection available, resolve any one of the given forces into two components and imagine that force replaced by them; then find the resultant of those components and the other given forces by the methods explained in the preceding article. Evidently this resultant is the resultant of the given forces.

Example. It is required to find the resultant of the four parallel forces (50, 30, 40, and GO pounds) represented in Fig. 31 (a).

Choosing the 30-pound force as the one to resolve, lay off AB to represent the magnitude and direct'on of that force and mark its line of action ab. Next draw lines from A and B intersecting at any convenient point O; then as explained in Art. 13, AO and OB (direction from A to O and O to B) represent the magnitudes and directions of two components of the 30-pound force, and the lines of action of those components are parallel to AO and OB and must intersect on the line of action of that force, as at 1. Draw next two such lines and mark them ao and ob respectively. Now imagine the 30-pound force replaced by its two components and then compound them with the 50-, 40- and 60-pound forces.

In the composition, the second component should be taken as the first force and the first component as the last. Choosing the 50-pound force as the second, lay off BC to represent the magnitude and direction of that force and mark the line of action bc. Then OC (direction O to C) represents the magnitude and direction of the resultant of OB and BC, and oc (parallel to OC and passing through the point of concurrence of the forces OB and BC) is the line of action.

Choosing the 40-pound force next, lay off CD to represent the magnitude and direction of that force and mark its line of action cd. Then OD (direction O to D) represents the magnitude and direction of the resultant of OC and CD, and od (parallel to OD and passing through the point of concurrence of the forces OC and CD) is the line of action of it.

Next lay off a line DE representing the magnitude and direction of the 60-pound force and mark the line of action de. Then OE (direction O to E) represents the magnitude and direction of the resultant of OD and DE, and oe (parallel to OE and passing through the point of concurrence of the forces OD and DE) is the line of action of it.

V Composition Of Non Concurrent Forces 0300187

Fig. 31.

It remains now to compound the last resultant (OE) and the first component (AO). AE represents the magnitude and direction of their resultant, and ae (parallel to AE and passing through the point of concurrence of the forces OE and AO) is the line of action.

32. Definitions and Rule for Composition. The point O (Fig. 31) is called a pole, and the lines drawn to it are called rays. The lines oa, oh, oc, etc., are called strings and collectively they are called a string polygon. The string parallel to the ray drawn to the beginning of the force polygon (A) is called the first string, and the one parallel to the ray drawn to the end of the force polygon is called the last string.

The method of construction may now be described as follows:

1. Draw a force polygon for the given forces. The line drawn from the beginning to the end of the polygon represents the magnitude and direction of the resultant.

2. Select a pole, draw the rays and then the string polygon. The line through the intersection of the first and last strings parallel to the direction of the resultant is the line of action of the resultant. (In constructing the string polygon, observe carefully that the two strings intersecting on the line of action of any one of the given forces are parallel to the two rays which are drawn to the ends of the line representing that force in the force polygon.)