The bar-bending device shown in Fig. 175 was devised by Mr. R. S. Hunt, C. E., and has been used by him to bend 1 1/4-inch bars. In bending bars of this size, it is not necessary to heat them; and the size of bars that can be shaped by this bender depends largely on the proportions of the materials of which the bender is constructed.

In constructing this device, a timber 10 inches by 10 inches and about 10 feet long is supported on posts and well braced, the top of the timber being about 3 feet high. A 2 by 4-inch plank is spiked on one edge of the 10 by 10-inch timber, the smaller timber extending to within 12 inches of the end of the larger, as shown in the figure. On the edge of the 2 by 4-inch timber, is fastened a 1/4-inch by 2-inch steel strap, which is the same length as the timber to which it is fastened. Opposite the end of the timber, and 3 inches from the timber, is a steel pin 1 1/2 inches in diameter. The lever is usually about 3 1/2 feet long, and made as shown in the figure.

To bend a bar with this device, the bar is placed against the steel strap with the point of the bar at which the bend is to be made opposite the steel pin. The lever is hooked on the pin, while being held at right angles to the bar to be bent. The lug on the lever rests against the bar; and by moving the lever towards the end of the timber, the required bend is given to the bar. For smaller sizes of bars, a washer should be placed over the pin so as to reduce the space between the pin and the bar to be bent.

Fig. 175. The Hunt Bender.

Fig. 175. The Hunt Bender.