All studies and completed exhibition drawings in the architectural schools are tinted in India ink or water-color. This is done to show the shadows, and to indicate the relative position of the different planes, and is the method of representation in common use in architects' offices, especially in the presentation of competition drawings.

Materials

Chinese, Japanese or India inks are used for rendering, on account of their clear quality and rich neutral tone. The ink comes in sticks, Fig. 13, and it is ground in a slate slab provided with a piece of glass for a cover. See Fig. 14.

Fig. 13. India Ink.

Fig. 13. India Ink.

There are various kinds of brushes. Camel's hair brushes are the cheapest and are useful for rough work. Sable brushes, Fig. 15, are two to three times as expensive as the camel's hair ones on account of the material, but are also very much better. The sable brushes have a spring to them not to be found in the camel's hair brush, and they come to a finer, firmer point. Chinese and Japanese brushes are used a good deal of late, as they are cheaper than the sable brushes and have some spring to them. A stippling brush is one with a square end, used mostly in china painting. A bristle brush is a stiff brush used in oil painting; on account of its stiffness it is used for taking out hard edges, as described later on. Fig. 16 shows a nest of porcelain cabinet saucers.

Fig. 14. Ink Slab.

Fig. 14. Ink Slab.

Fig. 15. Sable Brush.

Fig. 15. Sable Brush.

Besides these materials the student should provide himself with a large and a small soft sponge, and large blotters, which will sop up water readily. Whatman's "cold pressed" paper is the best paper to use for rendering in India ink.