In addition to the following Examination Plates, the student is expected to make such sketches or drawings of the different parts of the Order, from the descriptions and references in the text, as will enable him to understand thoroughly the different parts and their general forms and proportions.

The following plates are to be drawn out to the required sizes, as indicated in the following section. The plates should be carefully and thoroughly drawn out in pencil before attempting to ink them in, with the exception of the three studies mentioned in problem 10, which may be submitted in pencil for correction, the student finishing them in ink for his own possession at any time after. All of the large plates are to be drawn on a half-sheet of Strathmore smooth-finish or Whatman's hot-pressed drawing paper, with the border line laid out to the size given, 12 by 16 1/2 inches; and the paper should be trimmed with a half-inch border outside of this line, making the paper size of the finished plate 13 by 17 1/2 inches.

The measurement figures given on the various plates may be omitted from the drawings made by the student.

The titles of the plates are, generally speaking, to be lettered in the same fashion as are the principal drawings illustrating the foregoing section. The student should first be careful to place pencil guide-lines at the top and bottom of his letters, for both capitals and small letters.

The date, the student's name and address, and the plate number should be Lettered on each plate in one-line letters, such as are used in the title of Fig. 47.

Plate A

The student is to draw out to the size of 12 by 16 1/2 inches a plate showing the Roman Doric Order. This plate should be arranged in the same manner as Plates VII and VIII (Part I), and should show a Classic Roman Doric Order complete in all its parts. The student may use either the Mutular or Denticular style, as he may elect.

Plate B

The student should draw out the complete Roman Doric column after the manner shown in Plate LVII, but employing the method of determining the entasis given at the right in Fig. 141, and employing the capital and base shown in Plate VIII (Part I). The height of the column should be eight diameters; and the fluting, which should be shown in the previous problem plate, may here be omitted. This column should be drawn on paper of the same height as the other plates, but of much narrower width.

Plate C

The student is to draw a bay of an arcade, employing the Roman Doric Order, on a plate of the size of 12 by 16 1/2 inches. He should refer to Figs. 98 and 99 for the proportions of this arcade, but should so arrange his composition, that, without losing the proportions of the arch opening or the relations of the column diameter to its height and to the entablature, he may yet omit the plain section of the wall occurring between the Order entablature and the archivolt, marked A in Fig. 99. In his drawings, the center of the arch should be the center line of his paper, which will enable him to include the two columns and their piers. He may utilize anyone of the Doric Orders shown in the illustrations of this part.

Plate D

The student is to draw out to the size of 12 by 16 1/2 inches a plate showing the Roman Ionic Order. This plate should be ar-ranged in the same manner as Plate XIV (Part I), but should illustrate the Order shown in Plate XIII (Part I), and should show a classic Roman Ionic Order complete in all its parts.

Plate E

The student is to draw out the Roman Ionic column from the Temple of Fortuna Virilis, complete, as shown in Plate LVD., establishing his entasis after the method shown in Fig. 141, as before. This column should be fluted; and the same requirements as to height, size of paper, etc., that applied to Plate B, will also hold true of this drawing.

Plate F

The student is to draw out to the size of 12 by 16 1/2 inches a plate showing the Roman Corinthian Order. This plate should be similar in arrangement to Plate XXI (Part I), and should show a Classic Roman Corinthian Order complete in all its parts.

The student should employ for this plate the Classic Roman Order from the exterior of the Pantheon shown in Plate LII1

Plate G

The student is to draw out an entire column and shaft of the Roman Corinthian Order, employing the method of determining the entasis shown in Fig. 141. He is to take the column and shaft from the Temple of Antoninus and Faustina illustrated in Plate LIV.

Plate H

. The student is to draw out at the size of 12 by 16 1/2 inches the main doorway of the Pantheon, shown in Plate LV1II. He may omit the metal doors, pilasters, and transom work shown on this plate, in order to increase the size of his doorway. The section through the entablature may then be shown inside of the door opening.

Plate J

The student is to draw inside the border outlines of 12 by 16 1/2 inches the following examples of Roman Classic ornament:

In the upper left-hand quarter of his paper, he is to draw the entablature from the Temple of Antoninus and Faustina; and in the upper right-hand corner, the entablature from the Temple of the Sun, both shown in Plate LIV. In the lower left-hand corner, he is to draw the entablature from the Temple of Vesta at Tivoli, and in the lower right-hand corner, the Corinthian capital and base from the same temple shown in the same drawing (Fig. 130).

The three entablatures are to be all of the same height; and the capital and base, from the column of the Temple of Vesta, of a size best adapted to fill the remaining space.

Plate K

This problem is to consist of three drawings; but they are not required to be elaborately finished. In Plate LI is shown a method of constructing a Roman Ionic Order; and in Plate LV is shown a similar method of constructing the Corinthian and Com-posite Orders. The student is to make three drawings, each with a border outline size of 12 by 16 1/2 inches, employing this method of construction and carrying it to a point that will sufficiently show his acquaintance with its employment. The carving, it is necessary only to block in; and these three plates may be left in pencil instead of being inked in.

The object of this examination problem is to familiarize the student with these methods of proportioning, which are simpler and more readily comprehended and remembered than the more elaborate "modules" and "parts" systems.