Quality of Line. Too much stress cannot be laid on the importance of a good line, however insignificant it may seem. Care in each individual line is absolutely necessary for good work. A line that is stilt and hard, feeble, scratchy or broken, will not do. Such work will ruin a drawing that in other respects may be excellent. The accompanying illustration by one of the students of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is an example of excellent quality of line. Each line, even to the very smallest, has grace and beauty. By a very few, the ability to make such lines is speedily acquired-but by a few only-others may attain it by careful practice. Every line of a drawing-the outline of the building and each line of the rendering, even to the very shortest must be done feelingly, gracefully, positively. Usually a slight curve is advisable and if long; lines are used, a quaver or tremble adds much to the result. Each line of a shadow should have a slight pressure of the pen at the lower end. This produces a dark edge in the group of lines that make the shadows, giving definiteness to the shadow and contrast to the white light below it.

ESTERBROOK BANK PEN, NO. 14.

ESTERBROOK BANK PEN, NO. 14.

GILLOTT NO. 404.

GILLOTT NO. 404.

HOUSE AT WOLLASTON, MASS.

HOUSE AT WOLLASTON, MASS.

Frank Chouteau Brown, Architect, Boston, Mass.

North and Street Front. Walls of Brick, Plaster, and Timber. For Plans, See Page 298; for Interior, See Vol. II, Page 186.

HOUSE AT WOLLASTON, MASS.

HOUSE AT WOLLASTON, MASS.

Frank Chouteau Brown, Architect, Boston, Mass.

The Garden Front (Southern Exposure), Overlooking Boston Harbor and the Roadstead Beyond.

GOOD QUALITY OF LINE.

GOOD QUALITY OF LINE.

Line Work 0800218

Method. The combination of individual lines produces what we may term a method. The individual line may be good but the combining may be unfortunate. In making a wash drawing no thought is necessary concerning the direction of the wash, but in using lines at once the query arises as to what direction they shall take. A method is something one must grow into from a small, simple beginning. The accompanying illustration, the work of another Massachusetts Institute of Technology student, is an example of rare skill in method quickly acquired. There is an utter absence of anything rigid or mechanical in the whole. Observe how softly the edges of the drawing merge into the white of the paper. The vigor of the drawing is gathered in the dormer itself.

Line Work 0800219

Excellent Method

Vertical Lines. The simplest method is obtained by the use of the vertical line. Some draw-ings can be made entirely by this means. See Fig. 3, every line of which is vertical. This illustrates the value of a good individual line. It will be observed that although ver-tical, these lines are not severely straight and stiff, they tremble a little, or have a slight suggestion of a curve. In the shadow at the bottom of the drawing each line is em-phasized at the top by a slight pressure, and made thin at the lower end in order to soften off the edges of the drawing as a whole.

Fig. 3. VERTICAL LINE METHOD.

Fig. 3. VERTICAL LINE METHOD.

Fig. 4 FREE LINE METHOD.

Fig. 4 FREE LINE METHOD.

Free Lines. Fig. 4 shows another method. The vertical line is discarded and the freest possible line is used. No one direction is followed, but the lines go in any or all directions. Which is the better methods The answer doubtless must be that the free method is the least conspicuous. It is better adapted for general use, in the showing of various surfaces and textures.

Various Examples Of Bad Methods

Short, broken line, resulting in a spotty effect; a fault common with beginners. The white spaces between the ends of the lines are very conspicuous.

Short, broken line, resulting in a spotty effect; a fault common with beginners. The white spaces between the ends of the lines are very conspicuous.

The opposite in character to A. Long, unbroken lines, but so severely straight as to be hard and dry in general appearance.

The opposite in character to A. Long, unbroken lines, but so severely straight as to be hard and dry in general appearance.

Short lines, individually they may be very good, as they curve freely, but the combination is fussy and finnicky.

Short lines, individually they may be very good, as they curve freely, but the combination is fussy and finnicky.

Direction of line not bad, but is rather too coarse to be agreeable. Wide spacing of lines on light portions add to the coarse result.

Direction of line not bad, but is rather too coarse to be agreeable. Wide spacing of lines on light portions add to the coarse result.

These illustrate four bad methods. A has the least merit, the others approach to a fair quality. In E an effort is made to avoid all the faults shown in the others-the short or severely straight line, the over labor combination of C, and the coarse line of D.