The doorway shown in Fig. 138 was drawn and rendered by Emanuel Brune, at just one-tenth of its original size, from the remains of a doorway in the Doric Temple of Hercules at Cora. The scale in the center of the drawing at the bottom indicates the length of one meter, or approximately 40 inches in our customary method of figuring (39.37 inches, to be exact). The details of a side elevation of the bracket or consol supporting the door-cap, along with a section through this consol and the architrave surrounding the door, are drawn out in Fig. 139. This design shows strongly the influence of Greek precedent which we have already found so much in evidence in all the architecture of Cora and its vicinity, and therefore it may not be considered as so distinctively Roman as she more imposing doorway of the Pantheon, shown in Plate LVIII.

The doorway of the Pantheon is truly Roman in its proportions and treatment, and its richness of ornament. In place of the sloping opening and architrave, narrower at the top than at the bottom and rarely ornamented with carving, we find a large, rectangular opening with perpendicular jambs ornamented on their face by a Classic archivolt with elaborately carved mouldings, and surmounted w i t h a frieze having a plain, curved surface and a cornice of considerable proje c t i o n . The mouldings are of a good type of Roman section, and the carving is unusually appropriate in character to their outlines. The opening is filled with an elaborate screen of Classic pilasters, grilles, and doors, all of bronze. This metal work probably was originally plated in gold, and is one of the best-preserved specimens of Roman detail that has come down to us. This elaborate doorway lies at the rear of the deep Corinthian portico on the front of the building, and forms the main entrance to the circular rotunda of the interior. See Plate LYIII.

Fig 138. Doric Doorway from Roman Temple at Cori. Italy.

Fig 138. Doric Doorway from Roman Temple at Cori. Italy.

Roman Doorways 0800194

Fig. 139.