125. In elevation it will be seen that the piers of the second story (Fig. 22) are not as wide as those of the story below, by an appreciable amount. Although the figures given show a difference of only five parts, it must be remembered that the unit employed in the upper order is smaller than that used in the lower story, and therefore the difference is somewhat more than that which the actual figures suggest.

Chieregati Palace, Vlcenza, Italy; Andrea Palladio, Architect.

Chieregati Palace, Vlcenza, Italy; Andrea Palladio, Architect.

Detail of courtyard facade, showing Renaissance use of Ionic over Doric Order, both being of exceptionally refined and Classic proportions.

(Comvare with, detail of Theater of Marcellus opposite page 198.)

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PLATE XXIV.

(A reproduction at small size of Portfolio Plate XXIV.)

SVPERPOSITION*

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Fig. 22.

126. By referring to the section (Fig. 22) it will be seen that in this example the second-story column shaft at the base, lines with the frieze and column shaft at the neck of the order below, while the second-story pedestal and column base project beyond this line. This arrangement allows the center line of the second-story column to be over the center line of the column below.

127. In Fig. 23 another method, is followed; here the face of the pedestal or die of the second-story order is placed in plane with the frieze and column neck below, when it becomes impossible for the center line of the columns to coincide; there being, as shown by the dotted line in the section, a difference of eight parts between these center lines.

128. In Fig. 24 again, we find that the base of the shaft of the second-story order lines with the neck of the shaft below.

129. Where a pedestal is given to a second-story super-imposed order, except under exceptional circumstances, the method shown in Fig. 23 would probably be most certain of making a favorable impression upon the observer, although it might be possible that a compromise between the methods shown in Figs. 23 and 24 would better solve the problem. Such a question must be decided by the judgment of the designer. It might be said, however, that where the second-story column is placed upon the entablature of the first-story order without the interposition of a pedestal, the best effect would invariably be obtained by directly lining-in section-the face of the foot of the second-story column shaft with the face of the neck of the shaft below.

130. The facade shown in Fig. 22 is composed of two rows of super-imposed arches, one of the Tuscan and the other of the Doric Order, each pier carrying on its face an attached column shaft.

The Doric Order is raised on a support forming a pedestal and having a cap and base.

131. Fig. 23 is a facade of two stories, with the Ionic Order placed over the Doric Order. The columns are engaged in the

COLONNADED GALLERY.

COLONNADED GALLERY.

PLATE XXV. (A reproduction at small size of Portfolio Plate XXV )

COOK COUNTY BUILDING, CHICAGO, ILL.

COOK COUNTY BUILDING, CHICAGO, ILL.

Holabird & Roche, Architects, Chicago, 111.

Building Completed in 1907. Cost, $5,000,000. Length, 380 ft.; Width, 160 ft.; Height, 204 ft. Eleven Stories, with Sub-Basement Connecting with Tunnel System and Electric Railroad Service Underlying Business Portions of City. Walls, Gray Vermont Granite; Spandrel Sections, Green Terra-Cotta. The Corinthian Columns on the Exterior are 94 ft. Long and 9 ft. in Diameter. General Interior Plan is that of Letter E. Building Contains its Own Electric-Light and Steam-Heating Plants. City Hall, Shown at Left, is Practically a Duplicate of the Old County Building Replaced by this New Structure, and will Itself bo Replaced by a Similar Building Photographed June, 1907, 17 Months after Excavation was Started.

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Fig. 23.

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Fig. 24.

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Porto Palace, Vicenza, Italy (1588); Vicenzo Scamozzi, Architect. A Renaissance example of the use of Composite pilasters over an Ionic colonnade Facade of Church of San Vicenzo, Vicenza, Italy (Fifteenth Century). A Renaissance example of the use of arcades and columns after the Roman manner, the Composite Order being placed over the Corinthian wall which is pierced with arches between the lower columns, and with rectangular windows between the upper columns. The windows are ornamented with frames or architraves with an outer pilaster finish carrying consoles, the whole being surmounted by an entablature with a pediment. The details of these parts should be taken from the examples of similar details shown in Plate XXVIII.

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PLATE XXVI. (A reproduction at small size of Portfolio Plate XXVI.)

The support or pedestal of the Ionic Order forms a balustrade in the bay of the window.

132. In Fig. 24 is shown a section of a facade of two stories where the Ionic Order is used with the Corinthian above it. The columns are placed between arches, forming an arcaded gallery. The windows shown are found in the wall at the back of the gallery, and the upper entablature is surmounted by a parapet wall or balustrade.