Actual Contour.

Actual Contour.

The Lady In The Moon.

The Lady In The Moon.

The Moon as the ruler not only of Night, but also of the Realm of Death, the Sun as the ruler of Day and the Realm of Life, would be a very simple conception of the surrounding universe, and such a belief was very prevalent in ancient times. Directly above the head of the Moon Cynocephalus, there is an object that has been seen as a globe or fruit of some kind. It holds a position of prominence in the different mythologies of the past and plays no inconsiderable part in Egyptian belief, as will be readily perceived. They have apparently viewed it as symbolic of the Sun. Another small dark object which appears as the tip of the Moon Cynocephalus' tail has probably been considered as symbolic of the Moon itself; while they have been noted as the two eyes of the "Man in the Moon," - the larger disk or globe would appear as his right eye and the smaller as the left. We believe them to be identified with a sculptured figure found in Yucatan, that of a god having one eye larger than the other. The god in question is known as Tlaloc, the god of rain. (Cf. "Prehistoric Architecture," by Peet, page 408.) We also believe them to be associated with the figure known as the Manitou Face which is found in various parts of America, especially in Yucatan. (Cf. "Prehistoric Architecture," by Peet, page 307.) It is an interesting fact in this connection that we see two starry eyes, which bear a remarkable analogy to those seen upon the Moon, for one is considerably larger than the other; that one which we see in the polar group, Ursa Minor, being the larger, and that seen in Delphinus, the smaller eye. They are apparently the starry counterpart of those seen upon the Moon.

The long dark object near the eastern limb of the Moon, much resembling a man-headed serpent, or the attenuated form of a lion, seems to be the source of that symbolic couch upon which the dead were laid in preparation for burial. (Cf. "The Book of the Dead," Budge, Vol. II, page 47.) It certainly bears a remarkable resemblance to the above mentioned couch, especially as to that part where the characteristic fold is a feature. These couches were but the attenuated form of a lion with the tail curved upward over its back; the fold was derived from the head and neck of the Moon-object, and. has had place in the designing of their throne and chairs, for these we see with a fold which forms the back.

The object popularly known as the "Lady in the Moon" was associated with the goddess Isis. Her face is conspicuously marked and easily found; it is outlined in white, and lies with the mouth in close proximity to the larger disk. The dark figure, near the Moon's western limb, crowns her head; and the man-head of the figure, seen on the eastern, limb of the Moon, has his mouth in close proximity to her left breast; while both of them have apparently originated the Egyptian religious belief regarding Isis as suckling her son Horus. This fact is really too plain for words, when we view them in their relative positions. A dark protrusion from his mouth is easily seen as his tongue thrust out, and has been recognized by others than the Egyptian; for many of the early peoples were known to salute each other by protruding the tongue as a mark of respect, which custom we consider a derivation from this feature of the object. The top and front part of his head outline her chin and neck, while he may be seen as wearing a turban. It may be that this latter feature of the figure has been the origin, among many of the eastern peoples, of the custom of wearing the turban. The woman is seen with her face slightly upturned and as facing east. Her face, viewed from a different angle, presents a close likeness to the form in which the Buddha is represented, where we see her nose as his bald head and her face as his body. This object is outlined in white, and easily presents a marked likeness to the god in question. His head showing as bald, possibly has originated the sacred custom among not only Egyptian, but other priesthoods as well, of the shaving of the head. Even some present day priesthood orders observe such a custom, and it may be that they and the Egyptian have derived such from a like source. The Egyptian god Imhotep, who was represented in a sitting posture and with a bald head, is apparently a derivation from this Moon figure; also the same may be considered equally true of their god Ptah, who was shown with his head bald.

There is, of course, a depth to their symbolism regarding the Moon that we have not succeeded in penetrating; for we have been engaged principally in determining the symbolized objects connected therewith, rather than learning their value. Such will, probably, become clear later when we have delved deeply enough into the subject. It is an interesting fact in connection with these Moon figures that they appear to have their counterparts among the stars; we detect sufficient evidence of such to warrant us in advancing this statement. When we shall have succeeded in placing the real value upon each figure, and have arranged them in their proper sequence and order, we shall uncover a thing of great beauty and value; and with respect to the laws of the heavens, it will prove of more material value than is apparent upon the surface.