House Sewer

The drainage pipe connecting with the house drain at a point about 5 feet outside the building and leading to the sewer or other place of disposal.

Housing

The part cut out of one member so as to receive another. See the housing of the stair step into the wall string on Plate 59.

Hypotrachelium

That part of the Greek Doric capital that occurs directly beneath the annulets of the echinus.

Impost

The top member of a wall, pier, etc., from which springs an arch. It may be the capital of a pier or just a moulding on a wall.

Incise

To cut into, as letters incised or carved into stone.

Intercolumniation

The clear space between columns.

Intrados

The name applied to the lower or inside curving line of an arch.

Jamb

The inside vertical face of a door or window frame.

Joist

The framing timbers which are the direct support of a floor.

Key-Stone

The center top stone of an arch.

Label

The ornamental drip moulding over an arch.

Lancet Window

A high narrow window pointed like a lance at the top.

Lantern

The small structure projecting above a dome or roof for light or ventilation.

Lean-To

A small building against the side of another and having a roof sloping away from the larger structure.

Lintel

The horizontal structural member supporting the wall over an opening.

Lobby

An entrance hall or waiting room.

Loggia

A hall within a building but open on one side, this side being usually supported by a colonnade.

Lookout

A short timber for supporting the projecting cornice. See the box cornice of Plate 55.

Louver

A ventilating window covered by sloping slats to exclude rain.

Mansard Roof

A hipped roof having two slopes similar to the gambrel roof of Plate 24.

Mantel

The shelf and other ornamental work around a fireplace.

Marquetry

An ornamental surface built up of small pieces of various hard woods to form a pattern. Inlaid work.

Medallion

A round or elliptical raised surface, usually for ornamental purposes.

Meeting Rail

The horizontal rails of window frames that fit together when the window is closed. See Plate 50.

Metope

That part of the frieze between the triglyphs of the Doric Order. See Plates 64, 65, and 66.

Mezzanine

A low secondary story contained in a high story.

Mill-Work

The finished wood work, machined and partly assembled at the mill.

Minaret

A Turkish turret with balconies.

Miter

A beveled surface cut on the ends of mouldings, etc., that they may member at points where they change direction.

Modillion

An ornamental bracket supporting a cornice. See Plate 70.

Module

An accepted division for measuring proportions of the Orders of Architecture. It is taken as one-half of the base diameter of the column. See page 105 and Plate 70.

Mullion

The large vertical division of a window opening. In grouped windows it is the member that separates the sash of each unit.

Muntins

The small members that divide the glass in a window frame.

Mutules

The rectangular blocks supporting the cornice of the Mutular Doric Order. See Plate 65.

Narthex

A hall or lobby at the entrance cf a church.

Nave

The main or central portion of a church auditorium.

Necking

The middle member of a simple column capital. See Plate 63.

Newel

The post where the handrail of a stair starts or changes direction.

Niche

A recess in a wall; often to accommodate a piece of statuary.

Ogee

A reverse or letter S curve. Applied also to mouldings of this section.

Oriel Window

A projecting upper story window. A small bay.

Orientation

The direction of facing of a building.

Paleography

A study of ancient inscriptions and writings.

Panel

A piece of wood framed about by other pieces. It may be raised above or sunk below the face of the framing pieces.

Parapet

That part of a wall projecting above a roof.

Parting Strip

The strip in a double hung window frame that keeps the upper and lower sash apart. See Plate 49.

Parts

The thirty equal divisions into which the module is divided for convenience. See page 105 and Plate 70.

Party Wall

A division wall common to two adjacent pieces of property.

Pendent

Usually applied to ornamental hanging parts of a Gothic vaulted ceiling.

Pendentives

The structure at the upper corners of a square building which rounds the building at the top preparatory to receiving a round dome. They may be in the form of brackets or arches.

Pent-Roof

A lean-to or roof sloping one way only.

Perch

A means of measuring quantities of rubble stone. A perch contains 16 1/2 cubic feet.

Pier

A rectangular masonry support either freestanding or built into a wall.

Pilaster

When an attached pier becomes very high in proportion to its width, it is called a pilaster.

Piling

Wood or concrete posts driven down into soft earth to provide a safe footing for heavy loads. See Plate 39.